2022 or Is It COVID 02

By Greg Sitek

Forecasting is risky business and in times like we are currently experiencing it’s even riskier than normal. For example, 

Forecast For 2020 Is Definitely Not 20/20

By Greg Sitek

Forecasting usually uses a crystal ball for an all-inclusive overview, or a telescope for a long-range view, or a microscope for a finite, specific pinpoint view.

For 2020 a kaleidoscope is probably the correct instrument to use since forecasting anything with respect to the coming year is a virtual impossibility. Typically, there is the “what if” factor that points predictions in one direction or another. For 2020 there are more “what if” factors that stable ones.

Making predictions for the coming year are like shooting the ball in a pinball machine – you just don’t know where it’s going to go, what obstacles it’s going to hit, which direction it’s going to be forced into traveling. 

Well, we know where that got us. Right into the COVID-19 Pandemic and all its ramifications. (Full forecast at http://www.site-kconstructionzone.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=17626&action=edit)

So then there was last year, 2021…

Getting Ready to Face 2021

By Greg Sitek

The January editorial has traditionally been a capsule forecast. Last years was no exception. It was titled: “Forecast For 2020 Is Definitely Not 20/20” and definitely proved to be not 20/20. I believe that this is my 45thJanuary editorial and probably the most difficult of all. In retrospect, I remember writing the piece for January 2000 and referencing the anticipated effects of Y2K.

Based on what has been going on, not only here in the USA but globally, it’s safe to say that the dreaded impact of Y2K’s arrived 20 years after the fact. 

If looking at what to expect for 2020 was challenging looking at what to expect for 2021 is even more challenging.

By the time you are reading this some of the barricades preventing a 2021 forecast should have been resolved. No matter what happens the construction industries will be busy. 

(Full forecast at http://www.site-kconstructionzone.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=19637&action=edit)

Of all that has gone on in 2021 the newly passed INFRASTRUCTURE BILL will probably have the greatest impact on of the construction industries.

To help us understand what this bill means to the country, construction and the economy the following is an excerpt from the ConexoConAgg Newsletter posted online on December 2, 2021.

The Q & A presentation gives us a glimpse of what the industry can expect in 2022 and the coming years.

News.Conexpoconagg.com December 2, 2021

https://news.conexpoconagg.com/news/Expert-Q-A-What-the-newly-passed-infrastructure-bill-really-means-to-contractors/4954.article?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=CONEXPO-CON-AGG-365-2nd-December-2021

 

WHAT THE NEWLY PASSED INFRASTRUCTURE BILL REALLY MEANS TO CONTRACTORS

Excerpts from an interview with Kate Fox Wood, senior director, government relations, AEM

By Jenny Lescohier  December 01, 2021

Congress took a decisive step forward with the passage of the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), signed into law on Nov. 15. Now the focus is on what it will realistically mean to the American people, including construction contractors charged with doing the actual work. 

To get answers to many of the questions we all have about this potentially impactful piece of legislation, we talked with Kate Fox Wood, senior director, government relations, AEM. Based in the organization’s Washington, D.C. office, she oversees its federal government relations efforts.  

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365: Tell us about the infrastructure bill that was just signed into law.

Kate Fox Wood: Right before Thanksgiving, President Biden signed into law the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA). This is an enormous infrastructure investment bill, one of the biggest we’ve ever seen.

It spends roughly $1.2 trillion and touches every sector of infrastructure – transportation, water, energy, broadband, resiliency, rehabilitation of natural resources and more. It uses a broad definition of infrastructure, but that said, it is focused on physical infrastructure. This legislation does not deal with some of the social spending that Democrats are pushing for right now in their budget reconciliation bill.

Congress took a decisive step forward with the passage of the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), signed into law on Nov. 15. Now the focus is on what it will realistically mean to the American people, including construction contractors charged with doing the actual work. 

To get answers to many of the questions we all have about this potentially impactful piece of legislation, we talked with Kate Fox Wood, senior director, government relations, AEM. Based in the organization’s Washington, D.C. office, she oversees its federal government relations efforts.  

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365: Tell us about the infrastructure bill that was just signed into law.

Kate Fox Wood: Right before Thanksgiving, President Biden signed into law the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA). This is an enormous infrastructure investment bill, one of the biggest we’ve ever seen.

It spends roughly $1.2 trillion and touches every sector of infrastructure – transportation, water, energy, broadband, resiliency, rehabilitation of natural resources and more. It uses a broad definition of infrastructure, but that said, it is focused on physical infrastructure. This legislation does not deal with some of the social spending that Democrats are pushing for right now in their budget reconciliation bill.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365: How much time before contractors will begin to see new opportunities materialize?

Fox Wood: The highway bill reauthorization was approved, so baseline funding will stay on schedule. We should not see any disruption in that process. The $550 billion above baseline funding is going to take some time. I would say end of 2022 or into 2023.

Departments and agencies within the administration are being pushed very hard by the White House to get their acts together and get this money out as we head into the mid-term elections that are going to be taking place in November of next year, not to mention the presidential election in 2024.

Quite frankly, we need to get this right. It’s critical for our economy. This is such a monumental generational investment. If we get it wrong, it’s going to be really hard to keep that public trust that an infrastructure investment is a worthwhile endeavor.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365: What kinds of projects are likely to get funding first?

Fox Wood: Roads, highways and bridges are probably going to get the most attention, just because they’re the most visible.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365: Are there geographic areas that seem to be more in need of immediate attention than others?

Fox Wood: It’s a national bill, and I don’t really see it focusing on one area over another. I think it’ll be interesting to see how states and localities organize themselves and get their grant applications in. I think communities that get their ducks in a row faster will probably realize more funding than those which are a little slower.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365: What kinds of projects are likely to get funding first?

Fox Wood: Roads, highways and bridges are probably going to get the most attention, just because they’re the most visible.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365: Are there geographic areas that seem to be more in need of immediate attention than others?

Fox Wood: It’s a national bill, and I don’t really see it focusing on one area over another. I think it’ll be interesting to see how states and localities organize themselves and get their grant applications in. I think communities that get their ducks in a row faster will probably realize more funding than those which are a little slower.

2022 will definitely be an interesting and challenging year. “Hang on for the ride…”

This material appears in the January  2022 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & EngineerConstructionConstruction DigestConstruction NewsConstructioneerDixie ContractorMichigan Contractor & BuilderMidwest ContractorNew England ConstructionPacific Builder & EngineerRocky Mountain ConstructionTexas ContractorWestern Builder