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TRIP Report Identifies Montana’s Top 20 Transportation Challenges And Needed Fixes, Including Deteriorated Roads And Bridges, Congested Roadways And Needed Safety Improvements

TRIPDeficient roads, highways and bridges, and crowded or congested routes are posing mounting challenges to Montana residents, visitors and businesses. A new report released today by TRIP identifies the state’s top 20 transportation challenges, including road and bridge deterioration, inadequate capacity and needed safety improvements.

According to the report, Montana’s Top 20 Transportation Challenges and the Improvements Needed to Address them,” the improvements needed to address these transportation challenges will cost approximately $7.4 billion. However, at this time, funding is only available for $1.2 billion in needed improvements on these corridors, leaving a backlog of nearly $6.2 billion in needed improvements and upgrades.

The following, ranked in order, are Montana’s top transportation challenges. Further details about each challenge can be found in the TRIP report and appendix.

MT 1

“The Montana Chamber knows how important a good infrastructure system is to a strong economy and long-term prosperity,” said Webb Brown, president and CEO of the Montana Chamber of Commerce.  “To have that good system, we must have stable, dependable funding to ensure it.”

According to the TRIP report, in 2012, 29 percent of Montana’s major state and locally maintained urban roads were in poor condition, 37 percent were in mediocre or fair condition, and 33 percent were in good condition. Six percent of Montana’s state and locally maintained rural roads were rated in poor condition in 2012, while 35 percent were rated in mediocre or fair condition and 59 percent were rated in good condition.

“With Montana’s public infrastructure so vital to our health, safety, quality of life, and economic vitality, it is critical that all residents be informed regarding its current conditions so appropriate stewardship can be administered,” said Bill Wiegand, president of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) – Montana Section. The TRIP report echoes the findings of a report released by ASCE in 2014 examining the condition of Montana’s infrastructure.

Seven percent of Montana’s bridges were rated structurally deficient in 2013. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional 10 percent of Montana’s bridges were rated as functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards or are inadequate to accommodate current traffic levels, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

“The trucking industry needs reliable infrastructure for the safe and efficient transportation of goods produces in Montana,” said Barry “Spook” Stang, executive director of the Motor Carriers of Montana.

The state’s traffic fatality rate is among the highest in the nation, and Montana’s rural roads have a particularly high fatality rate. Montana’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.72 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012 is significantly higher than the national average of 1.13 and the third highest in the nation. Reducing this fatality rate was identified as the eighth most critical transportation challenge in the state. The fatality rate on Montana’s rural non-Interstate roads was 2.4 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012, more than two and a half times the 0.95 fatality rate on all other roads and highways in the state.

Enhancing critical segments of Montana’s transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness and improve quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth. Sustaining Montana’s long-term economic growth and maintaining the state’s high quality of life will require increased investment in expanding the capacity of the state’s transportation system, which will enhance business productivity and support short- and long-term job creation in the state.

“Investing in Montana’s transportation system and addressing these challenges by improving the condition and efficiency of the state’s roads, highways and bridges will be an effective step in boosting the state’s economy, enhancing quality of life and making Montana an attractive place to live, work and visit,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP.

Montana’s Top 20 Transportation Challenges and

Improvements Needed to Address Them

Executive Summary

            Montana’s extensive system of roads, highways and bridges provides the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. As the backbone of the Treasure State’s economy, Montana’s surface transportation system plays a vital role in the state’s economic well-being, and is an integral part of what makes Montana an attractive place to live, work and do business.

However, roadway and bridge deterioration, traffic safety concerns, and a lack of adequate capacity on some corridors to support economic development opportunities threaten to stifle economic growth and negatively impact the quality of life of the state’s residents. Due to insufficient transportation funding at the federal, state and local level, Montana faces numerous challenges in providing a road, highway and bridge network that is smooth, well-maintained, as safe as possible, and that affords a level of mobility capable of supporting the state’s economic goals.

Many segments of Montana’s transportation system have significant deterioration, lack some desirable safety features, and do not have adequate capacity to provide reliable mobility needed to support economic development particularly on routes that support the state’s growing energy extraction industry, creating challenges for Montana’s residents, visitors, businesses and state and local governments. This report looks at the condition and use of Montana’s system of roads, highways and bridges and provides information on the state’s top 20 transportation challenges and the improvements needed to address these challenges.

The transportation challenges outlined in this report represent approximately $7.4 billion in needed improvements. However, at this time, only $1.2 billion in funding for improvements for these corridors is available, leaving a backlog of nearly $6.2 billion in needed improvements and upgrades.

As Montana works to build and support a thriving and diverse economy, it will need to modernize its transportation system by improving the physical condition of its roads, highways and bridges, and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient, safe and reliable mobility to the state’s residents, visitors and businesses. Making needed improvements to Montana’s roads, highways and bridges would provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by stimulating short and long-term economic growth.

Montana faces significant challenges on many of the state’s most critical transportation routes, including the need to add capacity to support economic development, to improve roadway safety and to address pavement and bridge deterioration.

  • This report identifies the top 20 transportation challenges in the state, including critical sections of the state’s transportation system that have significant pavement deterioration, inadequate capacity, deficient bridges, or that need safety improvements.
  • A lack of adequate transportation funding is the constraining factor in developing and delivering these needed improvements.
  • Addressing the transportation challenges outlined in this report will cost approximately $7.4 billion in needed improvements. However, at this time, funding for only $1.2 billion in needed improvements on these corridors is available, leaving a backlog of nearly $6.2 billion in needed improvements and upgrades.
  • The following, ranked in order, are Montana’s top transportation challenges. Further details about each challenge can be found in the body of the report, as well as the Appendix.

MT 1

Growth in population and vehicle travel has far outstripped the current capacity of Montana’s transportation system. The state’s population and economy will continue to grow, bringing mounting challenges for the existing network of roads and bridges.

  • From 1990 to 2012, Montana’s population increased by 26 percent, from approximately 800,000 residents to approximately one million.
  • From 1990 to 2012, annual vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) in the state increased by 43 percent, from approximately 8.3 billion VMT to 11.9 billion VMT. Based on travel and population trends, TRIP estimates that vehicle travel in Montana will increase another 30 percent by 2030.
  • Every year, $22 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Montana and another $38 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Montana, mostly by trucks. Fifty-nine percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Montana are carried by trucks and another nine percent are carried by parcel, U.S. Postal Service or courier services, which use trucks for part of their deliveries.

Montana’s extensive transportation system has some road and bridge deficiencies, lacks some desirable safety features and experiences severe congestion in key areas. Improvements to the condition and efficiency of the state’s transportation system would enhance quality of life, roadway safety and economic development.

  • The state will need to expand and modernize key roads, highways and bridges to increase mobility and ease traffic congestion, make needed road and bridge repairs, and improve roadway safety.
  • In 2012, 29 percent of Montana’s major state and locally maintained urban roads were in poor condition, 37 percent were in mediocre or fair condition, and 33 percent were in good condition. Six percent of Montana’s state and locally maintained rural roads were rated in poor condition in 2012, while 35 percent were rated in mediocre or fair condition and 59 percent were rated in good condition.
  • Seven percent of Montana’s bridges were rated structurally deficient in 2013. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks, school buses and emergency services vehicles.
  • In 2013, 10 percent of Montana’s bridges were rated as functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards or are inadequate to accommodate current traffic levels, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes. A total of 1,053 people died on Montana’s highways from 2008 through 2012, an average of 211 annually.
  • Montana’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.72 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012 is significantly higher than the national average of 1.13 and the third highest in the nation.
  • The fatality rate on Montana’s rural non-Interstate roads was 2.4 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012, more than two and a half times the 0.95 fatality rate on all other roads and highways in the state.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

Transportation projects that improve the efficiency, condition or safety of a highway provide significant economic benefits by reducing transportation delays and costs associated with a deficient transportation system.

  • In the eastern portion of the state, Bakken oil extraction and support activities have resulted in increased overall traffic volumes and considerably higher than usual truck traffic as a percentage of the overall traffic stream. This additional traffic places a high level of stress on roadways, many of which were not originally built to accommodate such heavy traffic volumes and large vehicles.
  • Improved business competitiveness due to reduced production and distribution costs as a result of increased travel speeds and fewer mobility barriers.
  • Improvements in household welfare resulting from better access to higher-paying jobs, a wider selection of competitively priced consumer goods, additional housing and healthcare options, and improved mobility for residents without access to private vehicles.
  • Gains in local, regional and state economies due to improved regional economic competitiveness, which stimulates population and job growth.
  • Increased leisure/tourism and business travel resulting from the enhanced condition and reliability of a region’s transportation system.
  • A reduction in economic losses from vehicle crashes, traffic congestion and vehicle maintenance costs associated with driving on deficient roads.
  • Transportation projects that expand roadway or bridge capacity produce significant economic benefits by reducing congestion and improving access, thus speeding the flow of people and goods while reducing fuel consumption.
  • Transportation projects that maintain and preserve existing transportation infrastructure also provide significant economic benefits by improving travel speeds, capacity, load-carry abilities and safety, and reducing operating costs for people and businesses. Such projects also extend the service life of a road, bridge or transit vehicle or facility, which saves money by either postponing or eliminating the need for more expensive future repairs.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

According to a recent national report, improved access as a result of capacity expansions provides numerous regional economic benefits. Those benefits include higher employment rates, higher land value, additional tax revenue, increased intensity of economic activity, increased land prices and additional construction as a result of the intensified use.

The 2012 report, “Interactions Between Transportation Capacity, Economic Systems and Land Use,” prepared by the Strategic Highway Research Program for the Transportation Research Board, reviewed 100 projects, costing a minimum of $10 million, which expanded transportation capacity either to relieve congestion or enhance access.

  • The projects analyzed in the report were completed no later than 2005 and included a wide variety of urban and rural projects, including the expansion or addition of major highways, beltways, connectors, bypasses, bridges, interchanges, industrial access roads, intermodal freight terminals and intermodal passenger terminals.
  •  The expanded capacity provided by the projects resulted in improved access, which resulted in reduced travel-related costs, faster and more reliable travel, greater travel speeds, improved reliability and increased travel volume.
  • The expanded capacity provided by the projects resulted in improved access, which resulted in reduced travel-related costs, faster and more reliable travel, greater travel speeds, improved reliability and increased travel volume.
  • The report found that improved transportation access benefits a region by: enhancing the desirability of an area for living, working or recreating, thus increasing its land value; increasing building construction in a region due to increased desirability for homes and businesses; increasing employment as a result of increased private and commercial land use; and increasing tax revenue as a result of increased property taxes, increased employment and increased consumption, which increases sales tax collection.
  • The report found that benefits of a transportation capacity expansion unfolded over several years and that the extent of the benefits were impacted by other factors including: the presence of complimentary infrastructure such as water, sewer and telecommunications; local land use policy; the local economic and business climate; and whether the expanded capacity was integrated with other public investment and development efforts.
  • For every $1 million spent on urban highway or intermodal expansion, the report estimated that an average of 7.2 local, long-term jobs were created at nearby locations as a result of improved access. An additional 4.4 jobs were created outside the local area, including businesses that supplied local businesses or otherwise benefited from the increased regional economic activity.
  • For every $1 million spent on rural highway or intermodal expansion, the report estimated that an average of 2.9 local, long-term jobs were created at nearby locations as a result of improved access. An additional 1.6 jobs were created outside the local area, including businesses that supplied local businesses or otherwise benefited from the increased regional economic activity.
  • The report found that highway and intermodal capacity projects in urban areas created a greater number of long-term jobs than in rural areas, largely due to the more robust economic environment and greater density in urban communities.

In addition to state and local governments, the federal government is a critical source of funding for Montana’s roads, highways and bridges and provides a significant return in road and bridge funding based on the revenue generated in the state by the federal motor fuel tax. 

  • A significant boost in investment on the nation’s roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems is needed to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs, concluded a new report from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report found that annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges needs to increase from $88 billion to $120 billion and from $17 billion to $43 billion in the nation’s public transit systems, to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs.

Sources of data for this report include the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the American Association of State Highway & Transportation officials (AASHTO, the Strategic Highway Research Program and the U.S. Census Bureau. All data used in the report is the latest available.

Strata Systems, Inc. Hires Midwest Regional Sales Manager

Scott Czewski, P.E. Midwest Regional Sales Manager

Scott Czewski, P.E. Midwest Regional Sales Manager

Soil reinforcement product manufacturer and distributor, Strata Systems, Inc., has recently selected Scott Czewski, P.E. as its new Midwest Regional Sales ManagerCzewski joins Strata as part of an initiative to develop new business opportunities in the Midwest, and in Strata’s growing base reinforcement and road infrastructure business, and to manage all of Strata’s existing partners.  He’ll service all Midwestern states from Texas, north to the Canadian border and east to Indiana.

Czewski was selected due to his extensive civil engineering and sales background, which totals more than 15 years. He was previously employed at CSI Geoturf in Michigan as a project consultant where he generated engineering specifications for products, developed concepts and methodologies for cost-effective design and performed internal sales and installation training. Czewski holds a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from Michigan State University and is a licensed professional engineer.

To learn more about Strata Systems, Inc., visit www.geogrid.com.

 

TRIP Reports: The Top 50 Transportation Projects to Support Economic Growth and Quality of Life in New Mexico

TRIPNew Report Identifies New Mexico’s 50 Most Needed Transportation Projects For Economic Growth; Projects Would Improve, Modernize And Expand Road And Transit Systems To Support And Grow The State’s Economy

In order to adequately support New Mexico’s existing industries and provide for additional economic growth, the state will need to make numerous improvements to its surface transportation system. This is according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research organization.

TRIP’s report, “The Top 50 Surface Transportation Projects to Support Economic Growth and Quality of Life in New Mexico,” identifies and ranks the projects needed to provide New Mexico with a transportation system that can support the increased movement of people, goods and resources throughout the state.  The most needed surface transportation improvements in New Mexico include projects to build, expand or modernize highways or bridges, projects to improve rail or public transportation, and multi-modal projects. These improvements would enhance economic development opportunities throughout the state by increasing mobility and freight movement, easing congestion, and making New Mexico an attractive place to live, visit and do business.

According to the TRIP report, the most needed projects for the state’s economic growth are as follows

1.     US 491 expansion to four lanes from Twin Lakes to Naschitti

2.     Reconstruction of US 64 from Farmington to McGee Park.

3.     Reconstruction of I-25 Gibson, Cesar Chavez and Lead/Coal Interchanges.

4.     Adding two lanes to US 82 from Artesia to Lovington.

5.     Reconstruction of the Comanche, Montgomery, Jefferson, San Mateo and San Antonio I-25 Interchanges.

6.     Reconstruction and rehabilitation of NM 68 in Espanola.

7.     Construction of Central Corridor Bus Rapid Transit in Albuquerque.

8.     Addition of a third lane on I-25 between the Rio Bravo and Broadway Interchanges.

9.     Construction of a new four-lane roadway with bike and pedestrian amenities over the Animas River in Farmington.

10.  Construction of a new river crossing from I-25 to NM 47 in Valencia County.

A full list of needed projects, descriptions and their impact on economic development can be found in the appendix of the report. TRIP ranked each transportation project based on a rating system that considered the following: short-term economic benefits, including job creation; the level of improvement in the condition of the transportation facility, including safety improvements; the degree of improvement in access and mobility; and the long-term improvement provided in regional or state economic performance and competitiveness.

“New Mexico’s highways and bridges form a vital statewide transportation network, which is essential not only in supporting a healthy economy for our state, but also in providing safe, reliable access to homes, schools, healthcare, shopping and recreation,” said Mike Beck, executive director of the Associated Contractors of New Mexico.  “In order to protect the investment already made in our surface transportation system, we must not fall behind in our efforts to enhance and expand that system.”

Enhancing critical segments of New Mexico’s surface transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth, improving the quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors.

Sustaining New Mexico’s long-term economic growth and maintaining the state’s high quality of life will require increased investment in expanding the capacity of the state’s surface transportation system, which will enhance business productivity and support short- and long-term job creation in the state.

“Increasing investment in New Mexico’s transportation network of roads, bridges and transit is vital to boosting the state’s economy and the quality of life of its residents,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP. “In the short term, transportation investment creates good jobs, but the long-term benefits of an efficient transportation system connecting New Mexico’s residents, communities and businesses can span generations. If state and federal lawmakers fail to provide adequate transportation funding, New Mexico and the nation will lose their competitive edge and the state’s transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and gridlocked.”

Executive Summary

New Mexico’s transportation system has played a significant role in the state’s development, providing mobility and access for residents, visitors, businesses and industry.  The state’s roads, highways, rails and public transit systems remain the backbone of the Land of Enchantment’s economy.  New Mexico’s transportation system also provides for a high quality of life and makes the state a desirable place to live and visit.  The condition and quality of its transportation system will play a critical role in New Mexico’s ability to capitalize on its economic advantages and meet the demands of the 21st Century

To achieve sustainable economic growth, New Mexico must proceed with numerous projects to improve key roads, bridges, highways and transit systems.  Enhancing critical segments of New Mexico’s transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long-term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness and improve the quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth.

In this report, TRIP examines recent transportation and economic trends in New Mexico and provides information on the transportation projects in the state that are most needed to support economic growth.  Sources of data include the New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau.  All data used in the report is the latest available.

TRIP has identified the 50 transportation projects that are most needed to support New Mexico’s economic growth. These projects are located throughout the state.

  • The most needed transportation improvements in New Mexico include projects to build, expand or modernize roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems throughout the state.  These improvements would enhance economic development opportunities throughout the state by increasing mobility and freight movement, easing congestion, and making New Mexico an attractive place to live, visit and do business.
  • TRIP evaluated each transportation project based on the following criteria: short-term economic benefits, including job creation; the level of improvement in the condition of the transportation facility, including safety improvements; the degree of improvement in access and mobility; and the long-term improvement provided in regional or state economic performance and competitiveness.
  • New Mexico’s 10 most needed transportation projects to support economic development in the state as determined by TRIP follow. A list of the top 50 needed projects and descriptions can be found in the appendix.
  • 11.  US 491 expansion to four lanes from Twin Lakes to Naschitti. This $89 million project would widen the remaining 26.8 miles of two-lane roadway to four- lanes. US 491 is the only feasible north-south corridor in the region that will support heavy truck traffic. Completion of this project would allow for more efficient transport of coal, oil and other goods, while enhancing safety and boosting tourism.
  • 12.  Reconstruction of US 64 from Farmington to McGee Park. This $40 million project would reconstruct a four-mile portion of US 64 to provide additional capacity and access management. This project will provide additional capacity and increased safety resulting in improved transportation and economic opportunities in the region.
  • 13.  Reconstruction of the I-25 Gibson, Cesar Chavez and Lead/Coal Interchanges. This $200 million project would eliminate the S-curve on I-25 and reconstruct the I-25 Gibson, Cesar Chavez and Lead/Coal Interchanges. Completion of this project will improve mobility in the area and enhance access to and from the area to the Interstate system.
  • 14.  Adding two lanes to US 82 from Artesia to Lovington. This $95 million project would construct two additional lanes to make a four-lane facility from Artesia to Lovington. Completion of this project will accommodate the increased traffic due to the oil and gas industry in southeastern New Mexico.
  • 15.  Reconstruction of the Comanche, Montgomery, Jefferson, San Mateo and San Antonio I-25 Interchanges. This $125 million project would reconstruct the Comanche, Montgomery, Jefferson, San Mateo and San Antonio Interchanges on I-25 to alleviate congestion and improve mobility on I-25.
  • 16.  Reconstruction and rehabilitation of NM 68 in Espanola. This $70 million project would reconstruct 35 miles of NM 68 to four lanes, with auxiliary lanes along two-lane sections. This corridor serves commuter and recreational traffic in the region. Completion of the project would address operation and safety concerns.
  • 17.  Construction of a Bus Rapid Transit system in the Central Corridor in Albuquerque. This project would construct a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system along the Central Corridor in Albuquerque, from I-40 and Tramway Boulevard to I-40 and Atrisco Vista. This would include a combination of dedicated busway and mixed flow lanes within the current right-of-way. Central Avenue is a key connector of transit destinations and serves a large part of the transit-dependent population of the city. The institution of a BRT system would create more timely and dependable transit options and would assist in redevelopment of the vacant or underused land along the Corridor.
  • 18.  Addition of a third lane on I-25 between the Rio Bravo and Broadway Interchanges. This $50 million project would add a third lane to five miles of I-25 between the Rio Bravo and Broadway Interchanges to address congestion and improve mobility on I-25.
  • 19.  Construction of a new four-lane roadway with bike and pedestrian amenities over the Animas River in Farmington. This $22 million extension of Pinon Hills Boulevard would create a new river crossing and connect the retail district along East Main St to the developing area of unincorporated San Juan County east of the river.  This connection would reduce out-of-direction travel that motorists currently experience.  This road extension would help alleviate traffic volumes on the two nearest river crossings at Browning Pkwy and CR 350.
  • 20.  Construction of a new river crossing in Los Lunas from I-25 to NM 47. This $60 million project would construct a new river crossing from I-25 to NM 47 to improve mobility in Valencia County, provide for economic development and ease congestion in the area.

Transportation projects that improve the efficiency, condition or safety of a roadway provide significant economic benefits by reducing transportation delays and costs associated with a deficient transportation system.  Some benefits of transportation improvements include the following.

  • Improved business competitiveness due to reduced production and distribution costs as a result of increased travel speeds and fewer mobility barriers
  • Improvements in household welfare resulting from better access to higher-paying jobs, a wider selection of competitively priced consumer goods, additional housing and healthcare options, and improved mobility for residents without access to private vehicles
  • Gains in local, regional and state economies due to improved regional economic competitiveness, which stimulates population and job growth.
  • Increased leisure/tourism and business travel resulting from the enhanced condition and reliability of a region’s transportation system.
  • A reduction in economic losses from vehicle crashes, traffic congestion and vehicle maintenance costs associated with driving on deficient roads.
  • Transportation projects that expand roadway capacity produce significant economic benefits by reducing congestion and improving access, thus speeding the flow of people and goods while reducing fuel consumption.
  • Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes
  • A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,400 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

While New Mexico’s diverse economy has been impacted by the recession, the state’s transportation system will need to accommodate projected future growth.

  • From 1990 to 2012, New Mexico’s population increased by 38 percent, from approximately 1.5 million to approximately 2.1 million.
  • From 1990 to 2011, annual vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) in the state increased by 58 percent, from approximately 16.1 billion VMT to 25.5 billion VMT. Based on travel and population trends, TRIP estimates that vehicle travel in New Mexico will increase another 30 percent by 2030.
  • New Mexico’s unemployment rate nearly doubled from 3.5 percent in July 2007 to 6.9 percent in July 2013. New Mexico’s current unemployment rate is lower than the national average of 7.4 percent in July 2013.
  • New Mexico has benefited from a diverse economy, which includes significant employment in the following sectors: oil and gas production, tourism, agriculture, and film and television production.

New Mexico’s economy is served by an extensive surface transportation system that has some deficiencies and experiences severe congestion in key areas.  Roads carry the majority of freight shipped in the state.

  • New Mexico’s system of 68,384 miles of roads and 3,924 bridges, maintained by local, state and federal governments, carry 25.5 billion vehicle miles of travel annually.
  • Twenty-four percent of New Mexico’s major roads are deficient, with nine percent rated in poor condition and an additional 15 percent rated mediocre in 2011.  An additional 11 percent of the state’s major roads were rated in fair condition and 65 percent were rated in good condition.
  • Eight percent of New Mexico’s bridges were rated structurally deficient in 2012.  A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.  Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks, school buses and emergency services vehicles.
  • Every year, approximately $31.4 billion in goods are shipped annually from sites in New Mexico and another $46.6 billion in goods are shipped annually to sites in New Mexico, mostly by truck.
  • In 2012, nine percent of New Mexico’s bridges were rated as functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • Sixty-five percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in New Mexico are carried by trucks and another 18 percent are carried by parcel, U.S. Postal Service, courier services or by multiple modes, which use trucks for part of the deliveries.

Sources of data for this report include the , the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau.  All data used in the report is the latest available.

Founded in 1971, TRIP ® of Washington, DC, is a nonprofit organization that researches, evaluates and distributes economic and technical data on surface transportation issues.  TRIP is sponsored by insurance companies, equipment manufacturers, distributors and suppliers; businesses involved in highway and transit engineering and construction; labor unions; and organizations concerned with efficient and safe surface transportation.

National Demolition Association’s Environmental Excellence Awards Salutes Projects in Seven U.S. States and Canada

NDA Logo Projects cleaned up hundreds of contaminated acres of land in Nevada, aided in the redevelopment of a Michigan city, remediated a former paper mill site, recycled lumber into bio-fuel, and lead to the reuse of reclaimed materials in high-profile new construction sites.

National Demolition Association (NDA) presented the 3nd annual Environmental Excellence Awards to five companies which have performed demolition projects that demonstrate significant environmental conservation and community improvement, while bringing about a discernible positive impact on the quality of life in the U.S. and Canada.

“The Environmental Excellence Awards recognize NDA member companies which are true leaders in environmental stewardship,” said Michael R. Taylor, CAE, Executive Director of the NDA.  “Environmental stewardship is one of the demolition industry’s primary missions and these winning projects help illustrate truly dramatic efforts our members have made to make this a reality.

The winning projects, which were honored at the National Demolition Association’s 40th Annual Convention in Las Vegas, are:

Project: Mohave Generating Station, Laughlin, NV

ncm-mohave1NDA Member: NCM Demolition & Remediation, Brea, CA

NCM is currently decommissioning Southern California Edison’s giant Mohave Generating Station in Laughlin, NV, just west of Las Vegas.  The power plant is a 1,580-MW, coal-fired electric generating station situated on 3,000 acres adjacent to the Colorado River.  The facility has 217 acres of storage ponds, evaporating ponds, and a 300-acre landfill.  The scope of NCM’s scope of services includes asset recovery, asbestos abatement, hazardous materials handling, structural demolition, relocations of pond contents, and closure of the on-site landfill 

 

 

Project:  Revitalizing the City of Saginaw, MI

NDA Member: Bierlein Companies, Inc., Midland, MI

Bierlein Companies-6Bierlein Companies partnered with AKT Peerless Environmental and Energy Services to reform environmental remediation and demolition services at the Downtown Saginaw Redevelopment Project.  The scope of the project included the demolition of the eight-story Crowne Plaza Hotel and the adjacent 160,000-sq.-ft. Downtown Saginaw Mall.  The work also included abatement of 200,000 sq. ft. of asbestos material and universal waste removal.  Some 98% of the building materials onsite were recycled.

 

 

 

Project:  Plymouth Cordage Mill #2 Demolition and Recycling, Plymouth, MA

NDA Member:  Costello Dismantling Co., West Wareham, MA

Costello Dismantling Co3During the demolition of the Plymouth Cordage Mill in Plymouth, MA, Costello Dismantling was looking for innovative ways to recycle high-quality Southern Yellow Pine beams and structural decking in the building that have been exposed to more than a century of saturation from mineral oil used to condition hemp fibers prior to rope manufacturing.  After rigorous testing, sorting and shredding, the lumber was converted into 4,500 tons of bio-fuel.

 

 

 

Project:  Gaspesia Pulp and Paper Mill, Chandler, QC, Canada

NDA Member: EDS, Montreal, QC, Canada

Microsoft Word - NDA.docxEDS received a turnkey contract to dismantle and pack all process equipment; to perform the complete remediation of all contaminated materials; to remediate and decontaminate the entire site; to complete the demolition of all buildings and other structures on the site; and to recycle all of the structural steel and non-ferrous metals on site.  The object of the work was to provide the local community with a remediated site and green area for future park and golf course development.

 

 

 

Project: Reuse and Recycling in Projects in KS, MO, NY, UT

planetreuse2NDA Member: PlanetReuse, Kansas City, MO

The goal of PlanetReuse’s projects is to increase the reuse of reclaimed materials in a way that is beneficial to the owners, the demolition and recycling industries, and the end users.  Examples include the reuse of 86,000 sq. ft. of cypress, reclaimed hemlock, Douglas fir, and pine/spruce in a school in Greensburg, KS; the use of reclaimed material for the exterior walls of Kansas City’s Kaufman Center of the Performing Arts and bridges in Utah; 10,000 sq. ft. of oak flooring from a restaurant in Kansas City’s Power & Light District which was processed for reuse as flooring in two new retail project; and recycled portion of President Obama’s inauguration state into framing and walls for the Omega Institute for Sustainable Living in Rhinebeck, NY.

 

About the National Demolition Association

The National Demolition Association is a non-profit trade organization representing approximately 800 U.S. and Canadian companies and many international firms that are involved in the demolition process. Membership includes demolition contractors, general contractors, civil engineering firms, and recycling, landfill, and salvage operations.  The association’s efforts help members stay abreast of environmental, regulatory and safety matters, keep regulators informed about issues facing the industry, increase public and industry awareness, and provide members with networking opportunities and information on the latest technical advances in equipment and services.  The website is www.demolitionassociation.com.

Veterans as a Valuable Resource, Feature Article, August 2013 ACP Magazines

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