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New Mexico Transportation By The Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility

TRIPAdditional Funding Needed To Repair New Mexico’s Roads And Bridges, Ease Congestion, Improve Safety And Boost Economic Development And Quality Of Life

 More than one-fifth of New Mexico’s major roads are in need of improvement, 16 percent of bridges are in need of repair or replacement, drivers are increasingly stuck in congestion, and fatalities are occurring at a significantly higher rate on the state’s rural roads. Increased investment in transportation improvements could improve road and bridge conditions, ease congestion, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in New Mexico, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization. The TRIP report, New Mexico Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility,” provides data on key transportation facts and figures in the state:

58 %

Vehicle mile of travel (VMT) in New Mexico increased 58 percent from 1990 to 2011.

40%

VMT is projected to increase an additional 40 percent by 2030.

21%

44%

33%

Twenty-one percent of New Mexico’s major roads are either in poor or mediocre condition.  Forty-four percent of Albuquerque’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition, while 33 percent of Santa Fe’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.

$236

$322 million

$392

$310

Driving on rough roads costs the average New Mexico motorist $236 annually in additional vehicle operating costs – a total of $322 million each year. The average Albuquerque driver loses $392 annually due to deteriorated roads, while rough roads cost the average Santa Fe driver $310 annually.

 

16 %

A total of 16 percent of New Mexico bridges are in need of repair or replacement. Eight percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient and an additional eight percent are functionally obsolete.

83 %

The fatality rate on New Mexico’s non-interstate rural roads is 83 percent higher than on all other roads in the state.

394

An average of 394 people were killed each year in New Mexico traffic crashes between 2006 and 2010.

$658

$288 million

 

The average commuter in the Albuquerque metro area loses $658 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion – a total of $288 million each year.
 

$1.00 = $5.20

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

1,418,641

There are 1,418,641 licensed drivers in New Mexico.

“The TRIP report is a very good analysis that focuses on the condition of the roads and bridges in our state. The governor and legislature have always worked hard to invest in our state’s infrastructure, and that needs to continue,” said Daniel P. Silva, former New Mexico state representative.

According to the TRIP report, 21 percent of New Mexico’s major roads are in either poor or mediocre condition. In the Albuquerque metro area, 44 percent of roads are in poor or mediocre condition. And in Santa Fe, 33 percent of major roads are in poor or mediocre condition. TRIP calculates that driving on rough roads costs the average New Mexico motorist $236 annually in additional vehicle operating costs – a total of $322 million statewide each year. The average Albuquerque driver loses $392 each year due to deteriorated roads, while rough roads cost the average Santa Fe driver $310 annually. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

A total of 16 percent of New Mexico’s bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Eight percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient, which indicates that there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional eight percent of New Mexico’s bridges are functionally obsolete. These bridges no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Growing traffic congestion, particularly in the state’s urban areas, threatens to choke commuting and commerce. The average commuter in the Albuquerque metro area loses $658 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion – a total of $288 million each year.

“The TRIP report confirms what many in the business community have long professed – that as New Mexico considers the need to promote economic development, create jobs, boost tourism, and stimulate long-term economic growth statewide, we must also take into account the condition of our current transportation network, and the critical role that transportation plays in the welfare of our state,” said Mike Beck, executive director of the Associated Contractors of New Mexico. “It is essential that New Mexico finds a way to adequately fund and protect our state’s transportation infrastructure in order to deliver a reliable means of mobility for the motorists and businesses who depend on that system.”

Traffic crashes in New Mexico claimed the lives of 1,907 people between 2006 and 2010. The state’s traffic fatality rate of 1.37 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel (VMT) is higher than the national average of 1.11 fatalities per 100 million VMT. The traffic fatality rate in 2010 on New Mexico’s non-Interstate rural roads was 1.89 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel, 83 percent higher than the 1.03 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel on all other roads and highways in the state. Roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes. Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion.

“These key transportation numbers in New Mexico add up to trouble for the state’s residents in terms of deteriorated roads and bridges, reduced traffic safety and constrained economic development,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP.  “Improving road and bridge conditions, improving traffic safety and providing a transportation system that will support economic development in New Mexico will require a significant boost in state and federal funding for road, highway and bridge improvements.”

Executive Summary

New Mexico’s extensive system of roads, highways and bridges provides the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. This transportation system forms the backbone that supports the state’s economy. New Mexico’s surface transportation system enables the state’s residents and visitors to travel to work and school, visit family and friends, and frequent tourist and recreation attractions while providing its businesses with reliable access to customers, materials, suppliers and employees.

As New Mexico looks to achieve further economic growth, the state will need to maintain and modernize its roads, highways and bridges by improving the physical condition of its transportation network and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient and reliable mobility for motorists and businesses.  Making needed improvements to New Mexico’s roads, highways and bridges could also provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long-term economic growth as a result of enhanced mobility and access.

With a current unemployment rate of 6.4 percent and with the state’s population continuing to grow, New Mexico must improve its system of roads, highways and bridges to foster economic growth and keep businesses in the state. In addition to economic growth, transportation improvements are needed to ensure safe, reliable mobility and quality of life for all New Mexicans.  Meeting New Mexico’s need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways and bridges will require a significant boost in local, state and federal funding.

Population and economic growth in New Mexico have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system. 

  • New Mexico’s population reached 2.1 million in 2010, a 36 percent increase since 1990, when the state’s population was approximately 1.5 million.  New Mexico has 1,418,641 licensed drivers.
  • Vehicle miles traveled in New Mexico increased by 58 percent from 1990 to 2011 – jumping from 16.1 billion vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in 1990 to 25.5 billion VMT in 2011. By 2030, vehicle travel in New Mexico is projected to increase by another 40 percent.
  • From 1990 to 2010, New Mexico’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 78 percent, when adjusted for inflation.

Twenty-one percent of major locally and state-maintained roads and highways in New Mexico have pavement surfaces in poor or mediocre condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorist in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • Eight percent of New Mexico’s major roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, while an additional 13 percent of the state’s major roads are rated in mediocre condition. Twelve percent are rated in fair condition and the remaining 67 percent are rated in good or excellent condition.
  • In the Albuquerque urban area, 20 percent of major roads are rated in poor condition and 24 percent are rated in mediocre condition.  Thirteen percent of Albuquerque’s major roads are rated in fair condition and 43 percent are rated in good condition.
  • In the Santa Fe urban area, 15 percent of major roads are rated in poor condition and 18 percent are rated in mediocre condition.  Fifteen percent of Santa Fe’s major roads are rated in fair condition and 52 percent are rated in good condition.
  • The pavement data in this report is provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), based on data submitted annually by the New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways in the state (roads classified as arterials by the FHWA).
  • Roads rated in poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes.  In some cases, poor roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed. Roads rated in mediocre condition may show signs of significant wear and may also have some visible pavement distress. Most pavements in mediocre condition can be repaired by resurfacing, but some may need more extensive reconstruction to return them to good or excellent condition.
  • Driving on rough roads costs the typical New Mexico motorist an average of $236 annually in extra vehicle operating costs – a total of $322 million statewide. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Driving on rough roads costs the average Albuquerque motorist $392 annually in extra vehicle operating costs. The average motorist in the Santa Fe area loses an additional $310 annually due to driving on deteriorated roads.

Sixteen percent of bridges in New Mexico show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length. 

  • Eight percent of New Mexico’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Eight percent of New Mexico’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Commuting and commerce in New Mexico are constrained by growing traffic congestion, which will increase in the future unless additional highway and transit capacity is provided. 

  • Vehicle travel in New Mexico has increased dramatically in recent years, without a corresponding increase in roadway lane miles. As a result, the state’s roads have become increasingly congested, choking commuting and commerce.
  • According to the Texas Transportation Institute, the average driver in the Albuquerque metro area loses $658 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion – a total of $288 million each year.
  • The average commuter in the Albuquerque metro area loses 29 hours each year stuck in congestion.

New Mexico’s traffic fatality rate on rural, non-Interstate routes is 83 percent higher than on all other roads and highways in the state.  Improving safety features on New Mexico’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. Roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.  

  • Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 1,907 people were killed in traffic crashes in New Mexico, an average of 394 fatalities per year.
  • New Mexico’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.37 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2010 is higher than the national average of 1.11 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel.
  • The fatality rate on New Mexico’s rural non-Interstate roads was 1.89 fatalities per 100 vehicle miles of travel in 2010, approximately 83 percent higher than the 1.03 fatality rate in 2010 on all other roads and highways in the state.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion.  Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and, better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes.  A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

The efficiency of New Mexico’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy.  Businesses are increasingly reliant on an efficient and reliable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $31.4 billion in goods are shipped from sites in New Mexico and another $46.6 billion in goods are shipped to sites in New Mexico, mostly by truck.
  • Sixty-five percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in New Mexico are carried by trucks and another 18 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.
  • Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes.
  • A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system. 

Sources of information for this report include Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).  

 

TRIP Report: Wyoming Transportation Funding Shortfall Will Lead To Increasing Road And Bridge Deterioration, Increased Costs To Drivers And Lost Economic Development Opportunities

image001At a time when Wyoming faces an annual transportation funding shortfall of $332 million to improve its transportation system, one-fifth of the state’s major roads are deteriorated, nearly a quarter of bridges are in need of repair or replacement, and the state’s traffic fatality rate is among the highest in the nation.  Unless the state can increase transportation investment, conditions are projected to worsen significantly in the future.  Increased investment in transportation improvements could improve road and bridge conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Wyoming, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.  The TRIP report, Wyoming Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility,” provides data on key transportation facts and figures in the state:

$109.5 million

 

$332 million

Maintaining Wyoming’s transportation system in its current condition would require an additional investment of $109.5 million annually over the next decade. Improving the state’s transportation system and making needed safety and capacity enhancements would require an additional $332 million each year for the next decade.

$250 million

 

To keep pace with the transportation needs of the state’s rapidly growing energy extraction sector, WYDOT estimates that at least $250 million in additional transportation projects are needed to improve and expand the state’s roads, highways and bridges to accommodate increased traffic.
21%34 %

 

Due to a lack of available transportation funding, the number of miles of roadway in poor condition is projected to increase from 21 percent in 2012 to 34 percent in poor condition in 2023.
23 % 

Currently, a total of 23 percent of Wyoming bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.

46 % Under current funding, the number of bridges in need of significant repair or reconstruction in Wyoming is expected to increase 46 percent from 396 currently to 579 by 2023.
793159

Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 793 people were killed in traffic crashes in Wyoming, an average of 159 fatalities per year.

5th

Wyoming’s traffic fatality rate of 1.62 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is the fifth highest in the nation.

$187 million$461 TRIP estimates that additional vehicle operating costs borne by Wyoming motorists annually as a result of poor road conditions is $187 million statewide, or $461 per motorist.
64 %

Vehicle miles of travel (VMT) in Wyoming increased 64 percent from 9.6 billion VMT in 1990 to 9.6 billion VMT in 2010. By 2030, VMT in Wyoming is projected to increase an additional 40 percent.

216,496

There are 216,496 licensed drivers in Wyoming.

According to the TRIP report, the state faces an annual transportation-funding shortfall of $109.5 million over the next decade in the cost just to maintain its transportation system in its current condition. In order to improve Wyoming’s roads and bridges and make needed safety and capacity enhancements, the state would need to spend an additional $332 million each year for the next decade. Projects needed to accommodate the state’s rapidly growing energy extraction sector will total at least $250 million in additional funds.

“Roads are the lifeblood of Wyoming’s economy. The TRIP report confirms what many in our state are coming to understand: the challenges of maintaining Wyoming’s transportation system are significant and more work needs to be done to improve the state’s roads,” said Jonathan Downing, CEO of the Wyoming Contractors Association.

Because of this lack of transportation funding, road and bridge conditions are projected to worsen significantly in the future. Currently, 21 percent of miles of roadway are in poor condition. However, under current funding conditions, 34 percent of miles of roadway will be in poor condition by 2023. Bridge conditions will also deteriorate without additional funding. A total of 23 percent of the state’s bridges are currently structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The number of bridges in need of significant repair or reconstruction will increase by 46 percent  by 2023 under current funding conditions.

Driving on rough roads costs Wyoming motorists an average of $461 each annually in extra vehicle operating costs – a total of $187 million statewide. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

Wyoming’s traffic fatality rate of 1.62 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel (VMT) is the fifth highest in the nation and 46 percent higher than the national average of 1.11 fatalities per 100 million VMT.  Wyoming’s traffic fatality rate on rural, non-Interstate routes is more than double that on all other roads and highways in the state.  Roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.  Traffic crashes in Wyoming claimed the lives of 793 people between 2006 and 2010. The traffic fatality rate in 2010 on Wyoming’s non-Interstate rural roads was 2.12 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel; nearly double the 1.19 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel on all other roads and highways in the state. Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion.

“These key transportation numbers in Wyoming add up to trouble for the state’s residents in terms of deteriorated roads and bridges, reduced traffic safety and constrained economic development,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP.  “Improving road and bridge conditions, improving traffic safety and providing a transportation system that will support economic development in Wyoming will require a significant boost in funding for road, highway and bridge improvements.”

Executive Summary

            Wyoming’s extensive system of roads, highways and bridges provides the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. This transportation system forms the backbone that supports the Equality State’s economy. Wyoming’s surface transportation system enables the state’s residents and visitors to travel to work and school, visit family and friends, and frequent tourist and recreation attractions while providing its businesses with reliable access to customers, materials, suppliers and employees.

As Wyoming looks to achieve further economic growth and take advantage of its booming energy sector, the state will need to maintain and modernize its roads, highways and bridges by improving the physical condition of its transportation network and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient and reliable mobility for motorists and businesses.  Making needed improvements to Wyoming’s roads, highways and bridges could also provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long-term economic growth as a result of enhanced mobility and access.

Meeting Wyoming’s need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways and bridges will require a significant boost in local, state and federal funding.

Wyoming faces a significant shortfall in the amount of funding needed just to maintain the state’s transportation system in its current condition over the next decade. Because of a lack of available funding, the condition of Wyoming’s roads and bridges will decline over the next decade and the state will struggle to improve and expand the current transportation system to a level that will adequately accommodate the bourgeoning energy extraction sector.

  • According to the Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT), just maintaining the state’s transportation system in it’s current condition would require an additional $109.5 million in transportation funding each year through 2023.
  • In order to improve Wyoming’s transportation system and make needed safety and capacity enhancements, WYDOT estimates than an additional $332 million in transportation funding would be needed each year through 2023.
  • To keep pace with the transportation needs of the state’s rapidly growing energy extraction sector, WYDOT estimates that at least $250 million in additional transportation projects are needed to improve and expand the state’s roads, highways and bridges to accommodate increased traffic.
  • In order to aid economic development in the state, WYDOT estimates that approximately 409 centerlane miles of new roads will need to be added through 2023. However, under current funding, only 13 centerlane miles of new roads to aid economic development are scheduled to be completed through 2023.
  • A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.

Population and economic growth in Wyoming have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system. 

  • Wyoming’s population reached 568,000 in 2010, a 25 percent increase since 1990, when the state’s population was approximately 454,000.  Wyoming has 216,496 licensed drivers.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Wyoming increased by 64 percent from 1990 to 2010 – jumping from 5.8 billion VMT in 1990 to 9.6 billion VMT in 2010.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Wyoming is projected to increase by another 40 percent.
  • From 1990 to 2010, Wyoming’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 76 percent, when adjusted for inflation.

Twenty-one percent of all miles of roads and highways in Wyoming have pavement surfaces in poor condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorist in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.  Pavement conditions are expected to deteriorate in the future due to a lack of available transportation funding.

  • According to the Wyoming Department of Transportation, 21 percent of miles of pavement are in poor condition, while an additional 24 percent are rated in fair condition. Twenty-six percent of lane miles of Wyoming highways and roadways are rated in good condition and the remaining 29 percent are rated in excellent condition.
  • Due to a lack of available transportation funding, the number of miles of roadway in poor condition is projected to increase from 21 percent in 2012 to 34 percent in poor condition in 2023.
  • The condition of the Wyoming’s Interstate system is projected to deteriorate in the coming years due to a lack of available transportation funding. The number of Interstate miles in poor condition is expected to more than double in the next decade, rising from six percent of Interstate miles in poor condition in 2012 to 14 percent in poor condition in 2023.
  • Roads rated in poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes.  In some cases, poor roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • Driving on rough roads costs the average Wyoming motorist an average of $461 annually in extra vehicle operating costs – a total of  $187 million statewide. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

Twenty-three percent of bridges in Wyoming show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.  Due to a lack of adequate transportation funding, the number of bridges that are deficient or in need of significant repair or reconstruction is expected to increase significantly in the coming years.

  • Fourteen percent of Wyoming’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Nine percent of Wyoming’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • By 2023, WYDOT projects that a total of 31 percent of bridges will be structurally deficient or functionally obsolete due to a lack of available transportation funding. WYDOT estimates that in 2023, approximately 22 percent of bridges will be structurally deficient and nine percent will be functionally obsolete. 
  • Under current funding constraints, the number of bridges in need of significant repair or reconstruction in Wyoming is expected to increase 46 percent from 396 bridges currently in need of significant repair or reconstruction to 579 by 2013.

Wyoming’s traffic fatality rate on rural, non-Interstate routes is more than double that on all other roads and highways in the state.  Improving safety features on Wyoming’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in traffic fatalities and serious crashes in the state. Roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes. 

  • Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 793 people were killed in traffic crashes in Wyoming, an average of 159 fatalities per year.
  • Wyoming’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.62 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2010 is the fifth highest fatality rate in the nation and 46 percent higher than the national average of 1.11 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel.
  • The fatality rate on Wyoming’s rural non-Interstate roads was 2.12 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2010, significantly higher than the 1.19 fatality rate in 2010 on all other roads and highways in the state.
  • The number of fatalities occurring on the state’s non-Interstate rural roads is disproportionately higher than the amount of vehicle travel on these roads. While 46 percent of all vehicle travel in the state takes place on Wyoming’s non-Interstate rural roads, 61 percent of fatalities in the state occurred on non-Interstate rural roads.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion.  Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes.  A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

The efficiency of Wyoming’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy.  Businesses are increasingly reliant on an efficient and reliable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $23.8 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Wyoming and another $27.7 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Wyoming, mostly by truck.
  • Fifty-three percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Wyoming are carried by trucks and another seven percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes.

Sources of information for this report include the Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).  

Ditch Witch of West Texas, Inc., Expands Its OperationsInto Portions of Kansas, Nebraska And Wyoming

DitchWitchThe Ditch Witch organization announces that Ditch Witch of West Texas, Inc., Amarillo, Texas, recently purchased the stock of Kansas UnderCon, Inc., doing business as Ditch Witch UnderCon.  Ditch Witch of West Texas, Inc., is jointly owned by father and son team, Lenny and Jake Sadler.

 Lenny and Jake will continue to do business in Kansas and Nebraska under the name of Ditch Witch UnderCon.  Their newly DitchWitch Dlracquired territory includes all of Kansas except a few of the easternmost counties, central and western Nebraska and a portion of eastern Wyoming.  The Kansas/Nebraska territory has three existing locations—Wichita, Kansas; Grand Island, Nebraska; and Gering (Scottsbluff), Nebraska.

The expansion into Kansas and Nebraska seemed a natural move for Lenny and Jake, as their current territory borders the newly acquired territory.  Territory for Ditch Witch UnderCon, includes the Texas panhandle, the Oklahoma panhandle and Curry County in New Mexico.  Jake has already moved his family to Wichita, Kansas, to assume management of the Kansas and Nebraska locations, and Lenny will continue to manage the primary location in Amarillo.

The Sadler family has a long and proud history with The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMWÒ), manufacturer of Ditch Witch underground construction equipment.  Russ Sadler, Lenny’s uncle and Jake’s grand uncle, came to work for CMW in the mid to late 50’s, and was the first owner of Ditch Witch of Oklahoma.  J.D. Sadler, Lenny’s father and Jake’s grandfather, was CMW’s Chief Financial Officer during the 60’s and 70’s until his retirement in 1983.  During and following his graduation from college, Lenny worked for Ditch Witch of Oklahoma for a few years before purchasing Ditch Witch of West Texas, Inc., in 1972.  Lenny’s brother, Mike, owned and operated Ditch Witch of Mississippi for several years.  Another of Lenny’s brothers, Tony, worked at CMW for several years before moving to Amarillo to serve as Parts Manager for Ditch Witch of West Texas, which position he still holds today.  Following in his father’s footsteps, Jake began working at Ditch Witch of West Texas in December, 2000…and as the saying goes, the rest is history.

Ditch Witch of West Texas, Inc., has been in the business of selling and servicing high quality underground construction equipment since March 14, 1966, and under the Sadlers’ management since August 14, 1972.  The company also offers rental of new and used equipment.  In the seven year period from 2005 to 2011, Ditch Witch of West Texas, Inc., earned a place in the prestigious Ditch Witch Crescent Club Top Ten Dealers six times.  Customers who do business with Ditch Witch of West Texas, Inc., at any of its five locations can be assured of a seamless, quality customer service experience.

For more information, please contact Ditch Witch UnderCon, in Amarillo, Texas (866-445-8807); in Wichita, Kansas (800-582-1980); in Nebraska at either Grand Island (800-658-4312), or Gering (877-635-8135), and in Beaver, Oklahoma (580-625-2764).  You can also visit the company’s website at www.dwundercon.com .

 

Cashman Equipment will be hosting a Cat Auction Services unreserved live public auction at their LEED Gold corporate headquarters on December 14th at 9 a.m.

  • Buyers from all over the United States will have the opportunity to bid on a wide variety of equipment, including customer consignment machines, rental rollout items from Cashman Equipment and neighboring Cat dealers, and used equipment trade-ins from Cashman Equipment.
  • The Auction inventory includes equipment as large as a 2008 Cat 345CL Excavator and a 2007 Cat D8T Track-Type Tractor or as portable as a 194 lb. Wacker WP1550W Walk-behind Plate Compactor.
  • Interested buyers are invited to go online to view the entire equipment list, detailed TA-1 level Cat Certified inspection reports, and live-action videos of the equipment prior to the event by visiting www.catauctions.com. Equipment and videos will continue to be added until the week of the auction.

Todd Gilligan, Cashman Equipment General Manager of Sales & Marketing says:

“The equipment that has been assembled at our Henderson corporate headquarters is a great mix of high-quality, well-maintained construction equipment, which will be sold with detailed inspection reports so customers know precisely what they’re buying.” Gilligan went on to note that the comprehensive inspections inform the successful bidder of any updates or repairs needed; Cashman Equipment can then perform any service needed prior to shipment.

“We’re excited to be hosting Las Vegas’ first Cat Auction Services event,” added Gilligan. “While live public auctions certainly aren’t new, we’re looking forward to showcasing Cat Auction’s difference in style, approach, and features.”

Rick Albin, Cat Auction Services President adds:

“We are thrilled to bring the Cat Auction Services experience to the Las Vegas area,” said Albin. “While the online bidding option is always available and is worth checking out, our LEADERBOARD and theater seating create an atmosphere that is worth showing up for.”

“Cashman Equipment is one of the Dealer Partners that makes Cat Auction Services unique. Partnering with dealers allows us to offer a range of services, incredible expertise, and a level of transparency with which other companies cannot compete. We are very excited to be working with Cashman Equipment, and appreciate their support in hosting this auction.

Cashman Equipment Company… Founded in 1931 by James “Big Jim” Cashman, Cashman Equipment is one of the highest rated Caterpillar equipment dealers in North America. A full service dealership, Cashman provides new and used equipment for sale and rental, as well as high-quality parts and service to mining, construction, paving, truck engine, on-highway trucks, and power system industries throughout Nevada and parts of California. With LEED Gold certified corporate headquarters in Henderson, Nevada, Cashman is one of the largest privately-owned employers in the state. For more information, visit www.cashmanequipment.com or follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/CashmanEquipment) or Twitter (@cashmanequip).

Cat Auction Services entered the heavy equipment auction arena in late 2008. Reviews from all corners have been positive, and the auctions have drawn buyers from 49 states and 60 countries. Cat Auction Services was formed through a unique partnership of Cat dealers with the endorsement of Caterpillar, Inc. The addition of Cat Auction Services to the portfolio of services available to Cat customers and others in the heavy equipment industry builds upon the company’s existing customer loyalty. For more information, visit www.catauctions.com.

Cashman Equipment’s Rental Store, 3300 St. Rose Parkway, Henderson, Nevada, 89052

Wagner CAT and Thompson Tractor appointed as NorAm Dealers

Wagner Equipment Company and Wagner Rents, based in Aurora, CO. now represents the NorAm 65E compact motor grader in Colorado, New Mexico, and west Texas. The longtime Caterpillar dealer sells, rents, and supports the 65E at each branch location including their extensive network of Wagner Rents Stores. “NorAm offers a compact motor grader for our valued customers. The 65E provides excellent quality and productivity with value second to none. It definitely meets the Wagner creed to ‘meet the complete needs of our customers” says Brad Cofield, Wagner Vice President of Sales.

Thompson Tractor, headquartered in Birmingham, AL has been appointed the NorAm dealer with their 17 locations in Alabama and northwest Florida. Thompson Tractor is a family owned company in business for over 55 years. “The 65E grader is a complement to the line of equipment that we offer our customers and its reputation for quality and uptime meets our organization’s goals in supporting our marketplace” says Kenny Bishop, Thompson Vice President of Sales.

“We are extremely pleased to have Wagner CAT and Thompson Tractor join our team,” says Dave Watson, Vice President of NorAm. “These organizations and their professional team of sales and support staff are very highly respected in their marketplaces”.

For more information visit:  www.noram65.com.