Ditch Witch® Dealerships Awarded 2013 Crescent Club Top 10 Membership, the Company’s Highest Dealership Honor

CrescentClub2013-cThe Ditch Witch organization is proud to announce the 2013 Crescent Club Top 10 membership roster. This is the highest dealership honor.

“This award recognizes the top Ditch Witch dealerships’ teams dedicated to providing customers the application expertise, service, and products needed to help them be more productive with their time,” said Tiffany Sewell-Howard, Chief Executive Officer, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. manufacturer of Ditch Witch products. “We’re in this together with our customers and our Crescent Club Top 10 dealership members exemplify that commitment.”

The 2013 Crescent Club Top 10 members are:

-       Ditch Witch of Oklahoma & Arkansas (Edmond and Tulsa, Okla., Benton and Springdale, Ark.)

-       Ditch Witch of Minnesota, Inc. (Shakopee and Fergus Falls, Minn.)

-       Witch Equipment Company, Inc. (Fort Worth, Hewitt, Texas)

-       Ditch Witch Central California (Fowler, Newark, Corona and El Cajon, Calif.)

-       Ditch Witch Southwest (Lubbock and Odessa, Texas)

-       Ditch Witch of South Louisiana (Geismar, La.)

-       Ditch Witch of Virginia (Glen Allen and Chesapeake, Va.)

-       Ditch Witch Sales of Michigan (Howell and Grandville, Mich.)

-       Brandt Tractor Ltd. (Headquarters in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, and numerous other locations in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Ontario provinces)

-       Ditch Witch of North Dakota (Mandan and West Fargo, N.D.)

 

All Jammed Up

BY: HANNAH HAMILTONUSGS

HHAMILTON@USGSGOV, ETHAN ALPERN EALPERN@USGS.GOV

lookingDSfromBridgeIce Jams in Powder River at Arvada, WY, downstream of the bridge.

April showers may bring May flowers, but spring can also bring ice jams to the thawing rivers and streams across the northern United States.

An ice jam or ice dam, is a buildup of broken ice in the river system. It can be a problem that causes the water to back up over the top of highway bridges, roads, or into cities. At times, they can cause flooding. Ice jams can be large–backing up water for miles, or small and only back up water in a small area locally.

An ice jam can damage bridges with the amount of water pushing on the jam from behind; it can force the ice to push the bridge – moving it slightly.

USGS monitors ice jams across the north using cameras as well as by collecting ice thickness information when technicians do regular streamgage work or when measuring discharge on the rivers in the spring.

For example, each year, the Maine Emergency Management Agency and U.S. Coast Guard asks the USGS to measure the ice thickness and provide an ice jam flood potential on the Kennebec River. The U.S. Coast Guard has used their ice breakers to clear the ice in the lower Kennebec River in years when the ice jam flood potential was high.

Skunk_River_at_Augusta_-_large_fileIce breakup on the Skunk River

Greg Stewart, data section chief for the USGS New England Water Science Center, said its part of the agency’s job to monitor river flows throughout the state of Maine and to measure the stream flow underneath the ice.

USGS technicians take ice cores to measure ice thickness at various places on the rivers. In order to make an ice measurement, it’s necessary to drill between 25-30 holes in the ice. Then, thickness is recorded at just several of the holes to help document the measurement conditions.

That information allows the USGS to assess the risk of ice jams, flooding or other problems when the ice begins to melt, Stewart said. According to Stewart, when ice jam flooding starts to happen, there is very little time and very little warning.

Thickness of the ice and how fast a melt occurs affects the ice jam flooding potential. For example while the weather is cold, and the water is freezing you have ice accumulation. When the weather changes and it starts to warm the ice begins to melt and begins to break up. A quick warmup with the ice strong and still in place can cause significant ice jam flooding.

Another sign of spring is the melting snowpack, which is the result of accumulated layers of snow with generally more at high altitudes. Snowpacks feed rivers and streams providing an aquatic life habitat, hydro power, a possible source of drinking water, but they are also a potential flood hazard.

With a quick warm up of high temperatures over a short period of time, there is an increased likelihood of flooding from snowpack melt, but when you have a gradual increase in spring temperatures with moderate temperatures during the day and slightly below freezing at night the flooding potential is decreased slowly and safely.

According to Stewart, when the snowpack starts to melt, historically in March, that’s when snowmelt driven runoff begins and the USGS looks at the flooding potential.

To learn about the water levels at a streamgage near you sign up for alerts to your email or cell phone here!

Learn More:

Episode 6: Ice jams, flooding likely in Nebraska this spring, transcript: March 4, 2010

Thompson Bridge (Red River) Image Gallery

Ice Jam on the Niobrara River

Ice breakup at South Fork Grand River near Cash, SD

CATEGORIES: FEATURED, WATER

POSTED ON APRIL 9, 2014 AT 9:14 AM

LAST UPDATE 8:07 AM BY: HANNAH HAMILTON HHAMILTON@USGSGOV, ETHAN ALPERN EALPERN@USGS.GOV

ABC Reports: Construction Materials Prices Up 0.5 Percent in March

CEU2“Despite the increase in materials prices, this report does not signal a period of much higher inflation.” —ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.

PPI_4 11 14Construction materials prices expanded 0.5 percent in March and are up 1.1 percent from March of last year, according to the U.S. Department of Labor’s April 11 producer price index release. Nonresidential construction materials prices are up 0.4 percent for the month and are 1 percent higher than the same time one year ago.

“Despite the increase in materials prices, this report does not signal a period of much higher inflation,” said Associated Builders and Contractors Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “While it is true that there were significant increases in overall monthly inflation for both the broader economy and for construction, only a handful of categories were actually associated with a meaningful uptick in prices.”

Overall, the nation’s wholesale goods prices fell 0.1 percent in March but are up 1.7 percent year over year. Crude energy materials prices fell 6.8 percent in March but are still 13.6 percent higher than one year ago, and have expanded by 34.1 percent through the first three months of 2014.

“With respect to the broader economy, much of the inflation was related to food, which likely is a result of meteorological impacts,” said Basu. “With respect to construction, only three of 11 categories actually experienced increasing prices for the month. Given modest projections for both global and national economic growth, it is unlikely that significant inflationary pressures will be experienced during the month ahead with respect to most construction materials prices.”

The following materials prices increased in March.

Nonferrous wire and cable prices gained 0.1 percent in March but are down 2.7 percent from one year ago.

Concrete products prices expanded 0.3 percent in March and are up 3.9 percent from one year ago.

Prices for prepared asphalt, tar roofing, and siding expanded by 1.1 percent for the month and are up 0.1 percent from one year ago.

Eight of the 11 key construction inputs did not experience price increases for the month.

Iron and steel prices fell 1.7 percent in March but are up 1.3 percent from the same time last year.

Natural gas prices fell 10.9 percent in March but are 48.5 percent higher than one year ago.

Crude energy prices fell 6.8 percent in March but are 13.6 percent higher than one year ago.

Steel mill products prices shed 1.1 percent for the month but are 1.4 percent higher than one year ago.

Crude petroleum prices fell 6.4 percent in March but are up 3.9 percent from March 2013.

Prices for plumbing fixtures shed 0.8 percent for the month but are up 1.9 percent from the same time last year.

Fabricated structural metal product prices are down 0.2 percent for the month but have risen 0.5 percent from one year ago.

Softwood lumber prices fell 0.8 percent in March and are 2.1 percent lower than one year ago.

To view the previous PPI report, click HERE

ABC Reports: Jobs Report Meets Expectations In March

CEU2“The 6,700 nonresidential construction jobs added in March demonstrate the growth we expect in the second quarter of 2014.” —ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.

Employment_4 4The U.S. construction industry gained 19,000 jobs in March and the construction unemployment rate fell to 11.3 percent (non-seasonally adjusted), according to the April 4 employment report by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). Nonresidential construction segments added 6,700 jobs in March, a marked improvement from the 2,800 jobs (revised) added in February. The improvement led the construction unemployment rate to fall from 12.8 percent in February 2014 and 14.7 percent in March 2013.

The residential sector continued to build momentum, adding 9,100 jobs for the month. Heavy and civil engineering added 3,200 jobs in March and has added 22,100 jobs in the past 12 months.

“The 6,700 nonresidential construction jobs added in March demonstrate the growth we expect in the second quarter of 2014,” said Associated Builders and Contractors Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “The colder than normal winter has been particularly cruel to the construction industry, and its departure should bring accelerated job growth.

“While it is promising to see the construction unemployment rate shed more than a full percent in March, it remains well above pre-recession levels,” said Basu. “As spring finally settles in, the construction unemployment rate should return to the levels experienced in the third and fourth quarters of 2013 (approximately 9 percent).”

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ household survey, the national unemployment rate remained unchanged in March at 6.7 percent as the country added a total of 192,000 jobs. January and February’s jobs reports also were revised upward by a combined 37,000 jobs.

“Although the unemployment rate remained unchanged in March, the labor force (those either employed or seeking employment) increased by 1.5 million in the first quarter of 2014 after falling by 500,000 in 2013,” said Basu. “Gains to the labor force will, at least in the short term, apply upward pressure on the unemployment rate. That said, given the number of jobs created, upward revisions to prior months and expansion of the average workweek, today’s jobs report should not be viewed as disappointing.”

Nonresidential building construction employment grew by 2,200 jobs for the month and is up by 14,000 jobs (2.1 percent) since March 2013.

Residential building construction employment rose by 3,100 jobs in March and is up by 547,800 jobs (7.9 percent) since March 2013.

Nonresidential specialty trade contractors gained 4,500 jobs for the month and employment in that category is up by 12,700 jobs (0.6 percent) compared to the same time last year.

Residential specialty trade contractors gained 6,000 jobs in March and have added 55,200 jobs (3.6 percent) since March 2013.

The heavy and civil engineering construction segment gained 3,200 jobs in March and job totals are up by 22,100 (2.5 percent) compared to the same time last year.

To view the previous Employment report, click here

CONEXPO-CON/AGG continues momentum with 2017 dates, chair announced 
Richard Goldsbury of Bobcat/Doosan Infracore leads industry managing committee for 2017 exposition

The next CONEXPO-CON/AGG international exposition will be held March 7-11, 2017 at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, USA.

Named CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2017 chair is Richard M. Goldsbury, President Bobcat/Doosan North America & Australia/Oceania for Doosan Infracore Construction Equipment, West Fargo, North Dakota. He will lead the triennial show’s management committee, a group of volunteer manufacturers and other industry stakeholders who oversee show planning to ensure the event meets industry needs.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG is the Western Hemisphere’s global gathering place in North America every three years for the construction and construction materials industry, co-located with the IFPE exposition for fluid power/power transmission/motion control. The recently held 2014 CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE saw record exhibit and education numbers and nearly 130,000 registered attendees, including 24-percent international.

“2017 will definitely build on the momentum of 2014, and we are already in analysis and planning mode just weeks after such a successful event. Our focus is to amplify our efforts to deliver an outstanding quality show experience for our visitors, plus expand our exhibitor engagement outreach that results in improved exhibitor ROI,”  stated Goldsbury.

Rich Goldsbury is President of Bobcat Company and the Doosan heavy equipment division in North America, Australia, New Zealand and other Oceania countries and territories, responsible for all operations in these regions. He returned to the Bobcat organization in 2008, serving as President, Bobcat Americas, and was promoted to his current position in July 2010.

Previously, Goldsbury served as President for global product and business strategy with the Security Technologies Sector of Ingersoll Rand. He had been part of the Security sector since 2006 and also served as President of Schlage Security Products. He has been part of the industrial and construction equipment industry for almost 30 years, with extensive global experience in general management, marketing, operations, finance, engineering, product portfolio management, aftermarket and mergers and acquisitions.

Goldsbury is a Director for the Greater Fargo/Moorhead Economic Development Corporation. His leadership involvement with the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), a show owner and show producer, is extensive and includes currently serving on the AEM Board of Directors and as 2014 chair of its Government and Public Affairs Committee, and he has served as a director on the AEM CE Sector Board.

For the latest details on attending or exhibiting at CONEXPO-CON/AGG, go online to www.conexpoconagg.com