Archive for the 'National' Category

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5 Ways to Shake Up Your Safety Training

Safety is always an important topic because it’s always an important part of our lives, especially in construction where exposure to risk is a constant.

“Safety Training Ninja” will be presented on Thursday, March 12, 2020 from 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. at CONEXPO-CON/AGG.

Here’s a look at what you can expect, courtesy of the CONEXPO-CON/AGG:

5 Ways to Shake Up Your Safety Training

At 20-years old, Regina McMichael’s husband died after falling off a roof at a jobsite where he was working. That was the day her safety career started. Thirty-three years later she is still laser-focused on making the industry safer by improving the way we teach safety training. Her energy, humor, and engaging style as a speaker and trainer has earned her rave reviews throughout the industry. She recently shared five key ways to change your safety training to make it more effective.

  1. Identify What the Learners Know and What They Need to Know

“The gap between these two areas is what you teach to,” says McMichael. “Nothing more, nothing less.” She teaches trainers to use the ADDIE Model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) to first analyze and then design training.  “We need to respect our audience and not waste time teaching them things they don’t need to know, like the 29 CFR 19….– they don’t need to know that to be safe,” she says.

  1. Make Training Interactive

It’s time to put away those deadly PowerPoint presentations. McMichael recommends engaging workers with problem-solving activities. “Give them a scenario and ask how would you fix this? It will be much more interesting and fun,” she says. “Have the workers help develop the solutions and train themselves.” Use case studies, group discussion and competition to gain their interest and attention. “Friendly competition makes classes fun and makes things stick,” she says.

  1. Use Multiple Avenues to Train Workers

In construction there are a huge number of small firms without someone in a dedicated safety role. Those tasked with safety training are frequently overworked and can find themselves in a position of having to teach a topic they don’t have any expertise in. McMichael advises firms to use multiple training tools, such as local classes, online training, in-person training, and one-on-one jobsite training with supervisors to help lessen the burden on those in the safety-training role. “There is no one magic solution,” she explains.

  1. Bring Humanity Back to Safety

“If we’re going to be successful, safety training cannot be about compliance,” says McMichael. “We have to let human beings know we care about them and let them know we want them to stay alive.” Jobsite pressures can often result in workers not taking the time to be safe. Employers need to show they value workers by providing them with the knowledge and best practices to ensure they go home to their families.

  1. Support Your Trainers

McMichael believes a commitment to safety and effective training will enable companies to move from compliance-driven checklists to humanity-based solutions. One of McMichael’s classes, Getting a Seat at the C-Suite: What Every Safety Pro Should Know, focuses on how to get management to support safety initiatives. Another, titled Safety Training Ninjas, based on her recently released book, “The Safety Training Ninja” equips trainers with a process to develop effective training, and tools to make it valuable and something people want to learn. Trainers also learn how to develop learning objectives and demonstrate objectives were achieved. People not Policy, is about bringing humanity back to the safety world. All three programs will be offered at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020.

For free safety training resources and information about McMichael visit www.safetytrainingninja.com or http://www.reginamcmichael.com.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG’s comprehensive Education Program is the leading source for contractors, business owners, construction material producers and end users to obtain cutting-edge information for today’s challenging economy and business model.

About CONEXPO-CON/AGG

Held every three years, CONEXPO-CON/AGG is the must-attend event for construction industry professionals. The next CONEXPO-CON/AGG will be held March 10-14, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. For more information on CONEXPO-CON/AGG, visit https://www.conexpoconagg.com.

NEW TRIP REPORT IDENTIFIES NEW YORK STATE BRIDGES MOST IN NEED OF REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT

APPROXIMATELY 11.6 MILLION VEHICLES PER DAY CROSS STATE’S POOR/ STRUCTURALLY DEFICIENT BRIDGES; TEN PERCENT OF NEW YORK’S BRIDGES ARE RATED POOR/STRUCTURALLY DEFICIENT AND 53 PERCENT ARE RATED FAIR.

Ten percent of bridges in New York State are rated in poor/structurally deficient condition, according to a new report released recently by TRIP, a Washington, DC-based national transportation research nonprofit. This includes bridges 20 feet or longer. A bridge is rated poor/structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components

The TRIP report, Preserving New York’s Bridges: The Condition and Funding Needs of New York’s Aging Bridge System,” finds that 1,757 of New York’s 17,521 bridges are rated in poor/structurally deficient condition –ten percent. New York bridges that are poor/structurally deficient carry 11,590,945 vehicles per day.  Poor/structurally deficient bridges may be posted for lower weight limits or closed if their condition warrants such action. Deteriorated bridges can have a significant impact on daily life. Restrictions on vehicle weight may cause many vehicles – especially emergency vehicles, commercial trucks, school buses, and farm equipment – to use alternate routes to avoid weight-restricted bridges. Redirected trips also lengthen travel time, waste fuel and reduce the efficiency of the local economy.

Fifty-three percent (9,364 of 17,521) of locally and state-maintained bridges in New York have been rated in fair condition.  A fair rating indicates that a bridge’s structural elements are sound, but minor deterioration has occurred to the bridge’s deck, substructure or superstructure. The remaining 37 percent (6,400 of 17,521) of the state’s bridges are rated in good condition.

“Maintaining safe and stable infrastructure is critically important to all New Yorkers. Every day, millions of people travel through our state on what are often poor and structurally deficient roads and bridges,” said Senator Tim Kennedy, chairman of the New York State Senate Committee on Transportation. “Now more than ever we need to ensure that we’re dedicating resources to local infrastructure that is desperately in need of repair and maintenance. Taxpayer dollars must be put to work to improve our local community. I will continue to work with local stakeholders and continue to fight for additional funding to improve our roads and bridges.”

The list below details the five most heavily traveled poorly/structurally deficient bridges in the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, Binghamton, Buffalo, Hudson Valley, Long Island, New York City, Rochester, Syracuse, and Utica areas. ADT is average daily traffic. A list of the 25 most heavily traveled poor/structurally deficient bridges in each area can be found in the body of the report. The report’s Appendix also includes the individual ratings for the superstructure, substructure, and deck of each bridge.

“On behalf of our more than 900 Town Highway Superintendents we’d like to thank TRIP for its excellent work highlighting the need for increased funding to stabilize the condition of our state and local bridges,” said Town of Denmark Highway Superintendent Patrick Mahar, president of the New York State Association of Town Superintendents of Highways. “We commend Governor Cuomo and our state legislators for investing over $450 million in local bridges through the Bridge-NY program. But significant increases are needed in this and other local infrastructure programs to ensure New Yorkers don’t have to continue to drive over deficient bridges.”

The list below details the five poor/structurally deficient bridges in the state’s largest urban areas (carrying a minimum of 500 vehicles per day) with the lowest average rating for the condition of the deck, substructure, and superstructure. Each major component of a bridge is rated on a scale of zero to nine, with a score of four or below indicating poor condition.  A bridge receiving a rating of four or below for its deck, substructure or superstructure is rated as poor/structurally deficient. A list of the 25 bridges in each area with the lowest average rating for the major components of the bridge can be found in the body of the report. The report’s Appendix also includes the individual ratings for the superstructure, substructure, and deck of each bridge.

“The TRIP Report underscores what highway superintendents throughout the state understand the condition of many of our local bridges. Poor bridge condition ratings negatively impact functionality, time of travel, safety, the local economy and the overall experience of the traveling public,” said Dennis S. Davis, president of the New York State County Highway Superintendents Association. “With many aging bridges more than 70 years old, not to mention tens of thousands of culverts also requiring immediate reconstruction or replacement, we face a situation in desperate need of increased public investment and a concerted effort on the part of all levels of government to address the funding demands of our aging and ailing transportation systems.”

“New York’s bridges are a critical component of the state’s transportation system, providing connections for personal mobility, economic growth, and quality of life,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without increased and reliable transportation funding, numerous projects to improve and preserve aging bridges in the Capital Region and statewide will not move forward, hampering New York’s ability to efficiently and safely move people and goods.”

Preserving New York’s Bridges

THE CONDITION AND FUNDING NEEDS OF

NEW YORK’S AGING BRIDGE SYSTEM

Executive Summary

New York’s bridges are a critical element of the state’s transportation system, supporting commerce, economic vitality, and personal mobility. To retain businesses, accommodate population and economic growth, and preserve economic competitiveness, New York will need to maintain and modernize its bridges by repairing or replacing deficient bridges and providing needed maintenance on other bridges.  Making needed improvements to New York’s bridges will require increased and reliable funding from local, state and federal governments, which will also provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long term economic growth as a result of preserved and enhanced mobility and access.

 

NEW YORK BRIDGES ARE INCREASINGLY DETERIORATED

Ten percent (1,757 of 17,521) of New York’s locally and state-maintained bridges are rated as poor/structurally deficient, the 12thhighest rate in the nation.  A bridge is rated in poor/structurally deficient condition if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Bridges that are poor/structurally deficient may be posted for lower weight limits or closed if their condition warrants such action. Fifty-three percent of New York’s locally and state-maintained bridges have been rated in fair condition. A fair rating indicates that a bridge’s structural elements are sound but minor deterioration has occurred to the bridge’s deck, substructure or superstructure. The remaining 37 percent of the state’s bridges are rated in good condition.

The chart below details the number and share of poor/structurally deficient, fair and good bridges statewide and in New York’s largest urban areas.

Every day, approximately 11.6 million vehicles cross poor/structurally deficient New York bridges. The chart below details the number of vehicles in each urban area and statewide that cross a poor/structurally deficient bridge each day.

NEW YORK’S MOST DEFICIENT BRIDGES

The list below details the five most heavily traveled poor/structurally deficient bridges in the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, Binghamton, Buffalo, Hudson Valley, Long Island, New York City, Rochester, Syracuse, and Utica areas. ADT is average daily traffic. A list of the 25 most heavily traveled poor/structurally deficient bridges in each area can be found in the body of the report.

The list below details the five poor/structurally deficient bridges in the state’s largest urban areas (carrying a minimum of 500 vehicles per day) with the lowest average rating for the condition of the deck, substructure, and superstructure. Each major component of a bridge is rated on a scale of zero to nine, with a score of four or below indicating poor condition.  A bridge receiving a rating of four or below for its deck, substructure or superstructure is rated as poor/structurally deficient. A list of the 25 bridges in each area with the lowest average rating for the major components of the bridge can be found in the body of the report. The report’s Appendix also includes the individual ratings for the superstructure, substructure, and deck of each bridge.

NEW YORK’S BRIDGES ARE AGING

A significant number of New York’s bridges have surpassed or are approaching 50 years old, which is typically the intended design life for bridges built during this era. The average age of all New York’s bridges is 50 years, while the average age of the state’s bridges that are rated in poor/structurally deficient condition is 70 years.

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING AND PRESERVING NEW YORK’S AGING BRIDGES

Maintaining aging bridges becomes more costly as they reach the limits of their design life, challenging state and local transportation agencies to take an asset management approach to bridge preservation that emphasizes enhanced maintenance techniques that keep infrastructure in good condition as long as possible, delaying the need for costly reconstruction or replacement.

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that it would cost $3.6 billion to replace or rehabilitate all poor/structurally deficient bridges in New York.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of New York’s economy is riding on its transportation system. Each year, $1.3 trillion in goods are shipped to and from sites in New York, mostly by truck. Increases in passenger and freight movement will place further burdens on the state’s already deteriorated and congested network of roads and bridges. The value of freight shipped from and to sites in New York, when adjusted for inflation, is expected to increase by 154 percent from 2016 to 2045, and by 108 percent for goods shipped by trucks.

A report by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association found that the design, construction, and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in New York supports approximately 319,000 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $9.8 billion annually. Approximately 3.5 million full-time jobs in New York in key industries like tourism, manufacturing, retail sales, agriculture are completely dependent on the state’s transportation infrastructure network.

Sources of information for this report include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Bridge Inventory (NBI), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the American Road and Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) and the U.S. Census Bureau.

NAPA Reports: Use of Recycled Asphalt Reaches New High

New Asphalt Pavements Contain, on Average, 21.1 Percent
Material Reclaimed From Old Roads and Parking Lots

Asphalt pavements are the most consistently recycled material in the United States. Every day as part of maintenance and improvement projects, old asphalt pavement material is reclaimed from roads and parking lots and then put back to use in new pavements.

In fact, according to the latest industry survey by the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) in partnership with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) more than 100 million tons of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) was collected for re-use in the United States during 2018, saving some 61.4 million cubic yards of landfill space. This survey has been conducted for each construction season since 2009 by NAPA, and it has consistently found that nearly 100 percent of RAP is put to beneficial uses, primarily new asphalt pavements.

“Over the years, we’ve seen steady advancement in the amount of RAP being used across the country. This has been the result of concerted engineering efforts by industry and road owners to research and apply best practices to ensure we maintain or improve performance while increasing the use of recycled materials,” stated NAPA President & CEO Audrey Copeland, Ph.D., P.E. “As interest grows in incorporating other recycled materials into pavements, we must continue to gain a solid understanding of how new materials affect pavement performance before we move to widespread deployment.”

Nationally, the average amount of RAP in new asphalt pavements during 2018 was 21.1 percent, which is the highest level reported since the survey began in 2009. The survey found that 82.2 million tons of RAP, along with 1.05 million tons of recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) were used in 389.3 million tons of new asphalt pavement mixes in the United States during 2018.

An additional 8.8 million tons of RAP and RAS were used as aggregate, in cold-mix asphalt, and other road-building activities. The survey also found that at year-end 2018 about 111.7 million tons of RAP and RAS was stockpiled for future use across the country.

Although national usage estimates were not calculated, respondents to the survey reported recycling some 1.8 million tons of recycled tire rubber, steel, and blast furnace slags, cellulose fiber, and other reclaimed and waste materials into nearly 12.3 million tons of asphalt paving mixtures during 2018.

In total, more than 85 million tons of recycled materials — primarily RAP and RAS — were used in new asphalt pavement mixtures during the 2018 construction season, a 7.6 percent increase from the number of recycled materials used in 2017. The use of RAP and RAS alone resulted in cost savings of more than $2.9 billion compared to the use of virgin materials.

The asphalt pavement industry also continues to make significant use of energy-saving warm-mix asphalt (WMA) technologies. In 2018, 157.4 million tons of asphalt pavement mixture was produced using WMA technologies. More than half of this tonnage was produced at reduced temperatures, meaning less energy was required in manufacturing. The most common WMA technology used is plant-based foaming, which injects a small amount of water into the asphalt during production. A number of environmental, worker safety and construction benefits have been realized through the adoption of WMA technologies.

“A decade ago, WMA technologies were a novel idea. In 2018, though, more than half the asphalt pavement mixture tonnage produced in 23 states used WMA technologies, and in six of those states, it was more than 75 percent of the tonnage,” stated John Harper, 2019 NAPA Chairman and Senior Vice President of Construction Partners Inc. in Dothan, Alabama. “While there remains room to grow their use, WMA technologies have become just another tool we can use to produce the best asphalt mixture to meet a given project or agency need.”

The survey was conducted in the first quarter of 2019. Results from 272 companies with 1,329 plants in 49 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and two U.S. territories, along with data from state asphalt pavement associations for 33 states, were used to compile the report. A copy of the full survey report, including a state-by-state breakdown of data, is available at www.asphaltpavement.org/recycling.

About the National Asphalt Pavement Association

The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) is the only trade association that exclusively represents the interests of the asphalt producer/contractor on the national level with Congress, government agencies, and other national trade and business organizations. NAPA supports an active research program designed to improve the quality of asphalt pavements and paving techniques used in the construction of roads, streets, highways, parking lots, airports, and environmental and recreational facilities. The association provides technical, educational, and marketing materials and information to its members; supplies product information to users and specifiers of paving materials; and conducts training courses. The association, which counts more than 1,100 companies as members, was founded in 1955.

NAPA Relocates National Headquarters

New, Modern Office Space Incorporates Enhanced Teleconferencing
and Information Technologies to Improve Operations

The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) has moved to new offices in Greenbelt, Maryland effective September 13, 2019.

NAPA’s new home is a modern, dynamic space that will allow the association to better serve its national membership. With expanded meeting spaces and advanced teleconferencing capabilities, the new headquarters were designed to support greater collaboration between NAPA staff and member committees and task groups, as well as to enhance the quality of NAPA webinars and educational activities.

“This move is part of NAPA’s efforts to increase its operational efficiencies and strengthen its effectiveness,” said NAPA President & CEO Audrey Copeland, Ph.D., P.E. “We are making significant improvements in information technology for the association, and this new space supports those efforts. The asphalt pavement industry is always evolving to meet America’s needs for high-performing pavements, and we too, as an association, must innovate to meet the industry’s challenges and needs.”

“This state-of-the-art facility is built with the industry in mind,” said NAPA Chairman John Harper, Senior Vice President of Construction Partners Inc. in Dothan, Alabama. “The improved technological infrastructure, as well as the convenient location, will boost how NAPA staff connects with the association’s members nationwide.”

“From Greenbelt, NAPA is just minutes away from Capitol Hill and federal agencies, as well as our partner associations in D.C., Maryland, and Virginia,” said NAPA Second Vice-Chair Jim Mitchell, President of Superior Paving Corp. in Gainesville, Virginia, and leader of the task group overseeing the NAPA headquarters project. “Space itself was designed to reflect the industry. The project architects incorporated materials and elements that reflect the materials used by the industry, as well as asphalt pavement production through to the placement of asphalt roads.”

The new offices are located at 6406 Ivy Lane, Suite 350, Greenbelt, MD 20770-1441, with convenient access to the Capital Beltway/I-495, Baltimore–Washington Parkway, and the Washington Metrorail system. Telephone (301-731-4748 or 888-468-6499) and fax (301-731-4621) numbers for the association remain unchanged.

Founded in 1955, NAPA is the only national trade association focused exclusively on the needs and interests of asphalt pavement mixture producers and paving contractors. NAPA has been based just outside Washington, D.C., in Prince George’s County, Maryland, since 1963.

Serving more than 1,100 member companies, NAPA engages with federal lawmakers and regulators, leads research into pavement performance and technological innovations, develops and promotes best practices for safety and quality, and fosters opportunities for peer exchange, leadership development, and education for the industry and its customers.

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About the National Asphalt Pavement Association

The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) is the only trade association that exclusively represents the interests of the asphalt producer/contractor on the national level with Congress, government agencies, and other national trade and business organizations. NAPA supports an active research program designed to improve the quality of asphalt pavements and paving techniques used in the construction of roads, streets, highways, parking lots, airports, and environmental and recreational facilities. The association provides technical, educational, and marketing materials and information to its members; supplies product information to users and specifiers of paving materials; and conducts training courses. The association, which counts more than 1,100 companies as members, was founded in 1955.

 We Stand, We Salute, We Will Never Forget

We Stand, We Salute, We Will Never Forget