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LiuGong North America (LGNA) has partnered with Kinshofer North America to give scrap and demolition industry professionals a cost-effective, profit-widening scrap and demolition solution.

LiuGong North America (LGNA) has partnered with Kinshofer North America to give scrap and demolition industry professionals a cost-effective, profit-widening scrap and demolition solution.

The Kinshofer MQP-30-Y Multi-Quick Processor and LiuGong NA 925E excavator combination were featured at the “DEMOlition” event held by the National Demolition Association at its 2019 Demolition Rockies expo in March. The live demonstration gives prospective owners and their crews the chance to operate various types of equipment from different brands, comparing their performance and capability for themselves in a single day.

Alex Koss, U.S. Eastern Region Sales Manager for LiuGong NA, said, “Demolition, scrap, and recycling are highly competitive industries. So many things are outside the contractor’s control. One variable that gives them greater control of their profit margin is their choice of equipment and tools.”

That means choosing a reliable, productive excavator with a low upfront cost, low operating cost and low total cost of ownership, Koss said. “The Kinshofer processing attachment packaged with a LiuGong excavator interests scrap and demo contractors right away. It’s a potent, cost-competitive solution that lets them keep more of the money that they make.”

LiuGong manages its price-point by listening to contractors carefully, Koss said, then focuses its North American product designs on giving contractors exactly what they need from their machines. “That saves them money right away up front. They’re not paying for a lot of things they don’t need or want.”

Like all Kinshofer MultiQuick Processors, the MQP-30-Y features Kinshofer’s DemaLink jaw exchange system with six jaw options: combi, demolition, pulverizer, steel, tank and universal. The head was demoed with its pulverizer jaws but can be changed out in less than 10 minutes. Contractors can quickly switch from sheering through steel to demolishing reinforced concrete and then pulverizing it without slowing operations down. Primary and secondary demolition is performed right on site. All teeth and cutting blades can be changed out on site as well.

The LiuGong 925E excavator is an ideal match for the Kinshofer MQP30 Processor, designed for excavators in the 22 to 35-ton category (48,000 to 77,000 lb.). Its operating weight is 28.8 tons (57,540 lb.). Rated gross power is 190 hp from its 6.7 L Tier 4 Final Cummins engine, and maximum hydraulic flow is 126 gpm from two variable displacement pumps.

“We always like to work with LiuGong machines,” said Dany Martin, Territory Sales Manager Kinshofer North America. LiuGong excavators, he said, come straight from the factory with features especially beneficial for running attachments like the Kinshofer MQP-30 processor, which rotates through 360 degrees and requires varying delivery flows during operation. Features include a PTO-ready hydraulic system designed to deliver flow for tool rotation without taking flow from the main hydraulic pump, as well as LiuGong’s Attachment Mode (ATT) control. ATT allows the operator to choose from, and even program, six selection modes right from the operator’s station to match the engine’s engine horsepower to the hydraulic pump requirements of different work conditions.

“For best attachment performance, the excavator’s hydraulic system must deliver a consistent, high rate of flow no matter the work conditions to support the quick, reliable cycle times demanded by the Kinshofer MQP-30 processor (MQP),” Martin said. “Our patented DemaPower cylinder provides up to 20 percent more power than a standard cylinder and reduces cycle times to less than 5 seconds on the MQP and the DSP,” Martin said. “We now use this technology on our MQP, DSP, DCC, and new DXS shears.”

Among other LiuGong advantages, Martin pointed out was its lower fuel consumption, which reduces an owner’s operating costs. All Kinshofer products are covered by its two-year warranty. “And the LiuGong product line, of course, is covered by the best machine warranty in the industry,” he said. The three-year, 4,000-hour LiuGong warranty makes the packaged solution even more attractive to prospective owners.

During the six and a half hour demo, 15 of the 682 DEMOlition participants got to operate the setup for their own on-site comparison. More than 1,000 yards of concrete rubble had been brought to the fairground demo site and arranged in a 6-foot-high line for machines to work on.

The Kinshofer MQP-30 and LiuGong 925E package at Demolition Rockies was sold and delivered to LiuGong dealer Groupe Gymdex in Montreal Canada. Gymdex specializes in building scrap and demolition machines for their marketplace.

https://youtu.be/89YqjAPjPZ4

While the LiuGong name was new to many at the show, the company has been a trusted global leader in construction equipment for over 60 years. It’s North American product lines features major components that are familiar to the U.S. and Canadian market, such as the 925E unit’s Cummins engine. LiuGong NA products are supported through its offices in Katy, Texas, and its family of highly valued dealers, a coast-to-coast LiuGong network providing full sales and product service close to its customers, no matter where they work.

LiuGong Construction Machinery, N.A., LLC, located in Katy, TX, is a subsidiary of Guangxi LiuGong Machinery Co. LTD headquartered in Liuzhou, China. For over 60 years, LiuGong has been manufacturing machinery for the heavy construction equipment and material handling industries. Credited with building China’s first modernized wheel loader, LiuGong has become one of the fastest growing full-line construction equipment companies in the world. LiuGong uses globally respected systems and suppliers such as Cummins, ZF, Kawasaki and more. LiuGong North America is responsible for sales and product support for all LiuGong distributed machines, including the Dressta product line and LiuGong forklifts, for North America, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. LiuGong products are rugged, built with world-class components and are easy to maintain, especially in rigorous and isolated environments.

TRIP Reports: ILLINOIS MOTORISTS LOSE $18.3 BILLION PER YEAR ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES – AS MUCH AS $2,559 PER DRIVER.

ILLINOIS MOTORISTS LOSE $18.3 BILLION PER YEAR ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES – AS MUCH AS $2,559 PER DRIVER. LACK OF FUNDING WILL LEAD TO FURTHER DETERIORATION, INCREASED CONGESTION AND HIGHER COSTS TO MOTORISTS

Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost Illinois motorists a total of $18.3 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,559 per driver in some urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge, and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Illinois, according to a new report released by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research nonprofit.

The TRIP report, Illinois Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,”finds that throughout Illinois, more than two-fifths of major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor or mediocre condition and eight percent of locally and state-maintained bridges (20 feet or more in length) are rated poor/structurally deficient. The report also finds that Illinois’ major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, causing significant delays and choking commuting and commerce.

Driving on roads in Illinois costs motorists a total of $18.3 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculates the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Chicago, Champaign-Urbana, Metro East, Peoria-Bloomington, Rockford and Springfield urban areas.  A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area, along with a statewide total, is below.

The TRIP report finds that 19 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads in Illinois are in poor condition and an additional 23 percent are in mediocre condition, costing the state’s drivers an additional $5 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

“This report highlights how expensive it can be for Illinois drivers when the state does not maintain its basic infrastructure,” said Illinois Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Todd Maisch. “A stronger transportation system is vital to stronger business and a stronger Illinois. We must act now to improve our economy and quality of life in Illinois through infrastructure investment.”

Eight percent of Illinois’ bridges are rated poor/structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. The condition of state-maintained bridges in Illinois is anticipated to decline through 2023 based on current funding.  Forty-one percent of Illinois’ locally and state-maintained bridges have been rated in fair condition.  A fair rating indicates that a bridge’s structural elements are sound but minor deterioration has occurred to the bridge’s deck, substructure or superstructure.

“Poorly maintained roads are both a financial burden and safety hazard for Illinois motorists,” said Nick Jarmusz, midwest director of public affairs for AAA – The Auto Club Group.  “The investments necessary to rebuild our infrastructure would cost a fraction of what drivers are currently paying in the form of additional vehicle expenses, to say nothing of the increased risk of crashes and injuries.”

The Illinois Department of Transportation projects that, under current funding levels, the percentage of state-maintained roads and bridges in need of repairs will increase significantly in the next five years.

Traffic congestion throughout Illinois is worsening, causing up to 63 annual hours of delay for the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas and costing the state’s drivers a total of $8.5 billion annually in lost time and wasted fuel.

Traffic crashes in Illinois claimed the lives of nearly 5,100 people between 2013 and 2017. Illinois’ overall traffic fatality rate of 1.02 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2017 is lower than the national average of 1.16.  The fatality rate on Illinois’ non-interstate rural roads is approximately two-and-a-half times higher than on all other roads in the state (2.09 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.82). The financial impact of traffic crashes costs Illinois drivers a total of $4.8 billion annually.

The efficiency and condition of Illinois’ transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy.  Annually, $2.9 trillion in goods are shipped to and from Illinois, relying heavily on the state’s network of roads and bridges. Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to relocate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system. The design, construction, and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Illinois support 154,001 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy.

“These conditions are only going to get worse, increasing the additional costs to motorists, if greater investment is not made available at the federal, state and local levels of government,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without adequate funding, Illinois’ transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and congested, hampering economic growth, safety, and quality of life.”

 

ILLINOIS KEY TRANSPORTATION FACTS

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

Driving on Illinois roads that are deteriorated, congested and that lack some desirable safety features costs Illinois drivers a total of $18.3 billion each year. TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on rough roads, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.

 

ILLINOIS ROADS PROVIDE A ROUGH RIDE

Due to inadequate state and local funding, forty-two percent of Illinois’ major roads and highways are in poor or mediocre condition.   The condition of state-maintained roads and bridges in Illinois is anticipated to decline through 2023 based on current funding.

 

ILLINOIS BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Eight percent of Illinois’ bridges are rated poor/structurally deficient, meaning there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.  The condition of state-maintained bridges in Illinois is anticipated to decline through 2023 based on current funding.  Forty-one percent of Illinois’ locally and state-maintained bridges have been rated in fair condition.

 

ILLINOIS ROADS ARE INCREASINGLY CONGESTED

Congested roads choke commuting and commerce and cost Illinois drivers $8.5 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. Drivers in the state’s largest urban areas lose up to $1,500 and spend as much as two-and-a-half days each year in congestion.

ILLINOIS TRAFFIC SAFETY AND FATALITIES

Nearly 5,100 people were killed in traffic crashes in Illinois from 2013 to 2017. Traffic crashes in which a lack of adequate roadway safety features were likely a contributing factor imposed $4.8 billion in economic costs in 2017.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of Illinois’ economy is riding on its transportation system. Each year, $2.9 trillion in goods are shipped to and from Illinois, mostly by truck. By 2045, total freight tonnage being shipped in and out of Illinois is projected to grow by 40 percent, with 70 percent of the added tonnage moved by truck.

A report by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association found that the design, construction, and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Illinois supports 154,001 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $6.5 billion annually. Approximately 2.6 million full-time jobs in Illinois in key industries like tourism, manufacturing, retail sales, agriculture are completely dependent on the state’s transportation infrastructure network.

For the full report visit  TRIP