Archive for the 'California Builder & Engineer' Category

Page 2 of 9

Trip Report Identifies 125 California Transportation Projects Needed To Support Economic Growth

TRIPTrip Report Identifies 125 California Transportation Projects Needed To Support Economic Growth,But Many Face A Funding “Red” Or “Yellow” Light; State Needs To Complete Critical Transportation Projects To Improve Highway And Transit Network

Forty-two of the 125 transportation improvements identified by TRIP as being the most needed in California have Trip Report Identifies 125 California Transportation Projects Needed To Support Economic Growth, received a red light because they are unfunded and 69 of the projects have earned a yellow light because they only have partial funding available, jeopardizing the region’s future quality of life due to an inadequate transportation system.   These transportation projects would support the state’s future development by improving access, safety and conditions according to a new report released recently by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

TRIP rated each needed transportation improvement as either having a green light, a yellow light or a red light in terms of the availability of funding, with a green light indicating that adequate funding was available. The report finds that more than one-third of the 125 most needed transportation projects in California have earned a red light because funding is not currently available and, under current funding, is not anticipated to be available through 2020. More than half of needed transportation projects in the state have earned a yellow light because only a portion of needed funding is anticipated to be available by 2020 or the funding is uncertain. Only 14 of the state’s most needed transportation projects have a green light, to signify that full funding is likely to be available or is anticipated to be available by 2020.

“The TRIP Report highlighting important unfunded transportation projects in the San Francisco Bay area underscores the vital need for legislative action on a transportation revenue package to support a growing population and a robust economy,” said Will Kempton, executive director of Transportation California.

TRIP has identified needed projects in the Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco urban areas, as well as projects outside those urban areas. The transportation improvements outside the state’s largest urban areas, as determined by TRIP, which are the most needed to support quality of life and development goals, and their funding status are listed in the following table. Information on projects can be found in the report’s appendices: Appendix A – Los Angeles, Appendix B – San Diego, Appendix C – San Francisco, Appendix D – Sacramento and Appendix E – projects outside largest urban areas .

CA1

The TRIP report also found that California continues to experience significant growth, with the state’s population increasing by 16 percent since 2000 to 39 million, Gross State Product increasing by 27 percent since 2000, when adjusted for inflation, and statewide vehicle miles of travel increasing by 5.3 percent from 2014 to 2015. More than half – 51 percent – of major urban roads in California have pavements in poor condition, eight percent of bridges in California are rated structurally deficient and the traffic fatality rate on California’s rural non-interstate roadways is nearly four-and-a-half times higher than on all other roads and highways in the state, the report found.

Turning the red and yellow lights, which many of the region’s most critically needed transportation improvements currently face, to green lights, will require increased transportation investment at the local, state and federal levels.

Signed into law in December 2015, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, provides modest increases in federal highway and transit spending available to states, allows states greater long-term funding certainty and streamlines the federal project approval process. But the FAST Act does not provide adequate funding to meet the nation’s need for highway and transit improvements and does not include a long-term and sustainable funding source.

“Giving a green light to critically needed transportation projects in the Los Angeles area and throughout the state is going to require increased funding from all levels of government,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Unfortunately, too many of these transportation projects are facing yellow or red lights and potential state funding cuts could slow their progress even more.”
To review the entire TRIP California report or the various segments visit http://www.tripnet.org

Or scan:
TRIPCA qrcode-98

Construction Input Prices Trend Lower in Jul

CEU2“Key input prices fell or were flat in all but one category in July and further downward pressure on input costs is likely to be reflected in next month’s report.” —ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.

PPI July 2015Prices for inputs to construction industries declined 0.1 percent in July after increasing 0.2 percent in June, according to the Aug. 14 producer price index release by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Year-over-year prices were down 3 percent in July and have been down on an annual basis for each of the past eight months. Prices of inputs to nonresidential construction industries declined 0.3 percent on a monthly basis and are down 3.9 percent on a yearly basis.

“Key input prices fell or were flat in all but one category in July and it is important to note that further downward pressure on input costs is likely to be reflected in next month’s report, as well,” said Associated Builders and Contractors Chief Economist Anirban Basu.

“The state of affairs today is unprecedented,” said Basu. “Nonresidential construction spending has been recovering robustly in the U.S. in recent months—up more than 11 percent on a year-over-year basis. On top of that, the multifamily building boom continues in most major U.S. metropolitan areas.

“All things being equal, these circumstances should correspond with rising construction materials prices,” said Basu. “But as a reflection of how global the economy has become, America’s nonresidential construction recovery is taking place in the context of collapsing commodity prices. The latest round of commodity price decreases has been spawned by softening growth in China and ongoing increases in production of key inputs worldwide, including oil. However, this form of deflation should not be troubling to contractors. If anything, it will tend to boost profit margins for the average contractor, though falling commodity prices do not represent good news for construction firms heavily invested in oil and natural gas segments. These falling prices also imply slower increases in interest rates going forward, which will help extend the ongoing nonresidential construction recovery.”

Below are the key input prices for the month and the year.

  • Prices for plumbing fixtures remained flat on a monthly basis and are up 1.2 percent on a year-over-year basis.
  • Softwood lumber prices expanded 6.2 percent in July, but are 3.7 percent lower than a year ago.
  • Concrete product prices fell 0.1 percent in July, but are up 3.8 percent on a yearly basis.
  • Crude energy materials prices declined 6.2 percent in July and are down 37.8 percent on a year-over-year basis.
  • Fabricated structural metal product prices fell 0.7 percent for the month and have declined 0.4 percent on a year-over-year basis.
  • Natural gas prices declined 1.9 percent in July and are 38.4 percent lower than the same time one year ago.
  • Iron and steel prices were down 1.1 percent in July and are down 15 percent from the same time last year.
  • Prices for prepared asphalt, tar roofing, and siding fell 0.1 percent for the month and are down 0.4 percent on a year-ago basis.
  • Steel mill products prices fell 1 percent for the month and are 13.2 percent lower than one year ago.
  • Crude petroleum prices fell 12.3 percent in July and are down 48.8 percent from the same time one year ago.
  • Nonferrous wire and cable prices fell 1.3 percent on a monthly basis and are down 5.2 percent on a yearly basis.

To view the previous PPI report, click here

TRIP Reports: Deficient Roadways Cost Each California Driver As Much As $2,500 Annually, A Total Of $44 Billion Statewide. Costs Will Rise And Transportation Woes Will Worsen Without Significant Funding Boost

TRIPRoads and bridges that are deficient, congested or lack desirable safety features cost California motorists a total of $44 billion statewide annually – as high as nearly $2,500 per driver – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road and bridge conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in California, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, “California Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout California, 34 percent of major urban roads and highways are in poor condition. More than a quarter of California’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year. And California’s rural non-interstate traffic fatality rate is more than four times the fatality rate on all other roads in the state.

Driving on deficient roads costs each California driver as much as $2,458 per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the cost of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculated the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in California’s largest urban areas: Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco-Oakland and San Jose. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area along with a statewide total is below.

TRIP CalThe TRIP report finds that a total of 34 percent of major roads in California are rated in poor condition, while an additional 41 percent of the state’s major roads are rated in mediocre or fair condition and the remaining 25 percent are rated in in good condition.

“Our goal is to responsibly manage the state’s valuable infrastructure—starting with our new ‘fix it first’ policy—because every dollar invested in maintenance saves taxpayers from future repairs that are ten times more expensive,” said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty. “California motorists are currently enjoying highways that are in the best condition in more than a decade, and stable transportation funding would allow us to continue to provide safe and sustainable transportation infrastructure that enhances California’s economy and livability.”

A total of 28 percent of California’s bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Eleven percent of California’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional seven percent of the state’s bridges are functionally obsolete, which means they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

“California’s roads and highways are among the most heavily traveled in the nation and this report reflects the fact that our transportation system is simply worn out,” said Will Kempton, executive director of Transportation California.  “Unfortunately, local and state agencies don’t have adequate resources to keep these facilities in good condition.  However, it would be cheaper to pay to fix our aging system than paying the extra costs of driving on rough roads, and the longer we delay, the more expensive the cost of repair will be.”

Traffic crashes in California claimed the lives of 14,878 people between 2008 and 2012 California’s non-Interstate rural roads are particularly deadly, with a fatality rate in 2012 of 2.61 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel, more than four times the fatality rate of 0.63 on all other roads and highways in the state. California’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.88 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is lower than the national average of 1.13.

“Well maintained infrastructure is an integral part of fostering economic growth and enhancing our quality of life,” said Tom Holsman, Associated General Contractors of California’s chief executive officer. “Investment in road and highway infrastructure is vital to our state’s productivity, competiveness and economic well-being – now and for future generations who will need new roads, ports and bridges.”

The efficiency of California’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs.

The Federal surface transportation program is a critical source of funding in California. From 2008 to 2012, the federal government provided $1.32 for road improvements in California for every dollar the state paid in federal motor fees. Congress recently approved an eight-month extension of the federal surface transportation program, which will now run through May 31, 2015. The recent legislation will also transfer nearly $11 billion into the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) to preserve existing levels of highway and public transportation investment through the end of May 2015.

“These conditions are only going to get worse if greater funding is not made available at the state and federal levels,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Congress can help by approving a long-term federal surface transportation program that provides adequate funding levels, based on a reliable funding source. If not, California is going to see its future federal funding threatened, resulting in in fewer road and bridge repair projects, loss of jobs and a burden on the state’s economy.”

CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION BY THE NUMBERS:

Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility

Ten Key Transportation Numbers in California

 

 

 

$44 billion

Driving on deficient roads costs California motorists a total of $44 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.
$2,458

$1,543

$1,886

$2,206

$1,723

TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in California’s largest urban areas in the form of additional VOC, congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. The average Los Angeles driver loses $2,485 each year; each Sacramento motorist loses $1,543 annually; each San Diego driver loses $1,886 annually; each driver in San Francisco-Oakland area loses $2,206; and each San Jose driver loses $1,723.
2,976

14,878

On average, 2,976 people were killed annually in California traffic crashes from 2008 to 2012, a total of 14,878 fatalities over the five year period.
 

4X

The fatality rate on California’s non-interstate rural roads is more than four times higher than that on all other roads in the state (2.61 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.63).
$1.34 trillion

$1.28 trillion

Annually, $1.34 trillion in goods are shipped from sites in California and another $1.28 trillion in goods are shipped to sites in California, mostly by truck.
 

28 %

A total of 28 percent of California bridges are in need of repair, improvement or replacement. Eleven percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient and 17 percent are functionally obsolete.
61 hours

32 hours

37 hours

61 hours

39 hours

The average driver in the Los Angeles urban area loses 61 hours each year as a result of traffic congestion; each Sacramento area driver loses 32 hours annually; each San Diego area motorist loses 37 hours each year; each driver in San Francisco-Oakland area wastes 61 hours annually in congestion; and the average San Jose area motorist loses 39 hours.
 

$1 billion=

27,800 jobs

An analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
 

$1.32

 

From 2008 to 2012, the federal government provided $1.32 for road improvements in California for every dollar paid in California in federal motor fuel fees.
 

 

$1.00 = $5.20

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Deficient-roads-cost-California-all-areas

Executive Summary

California’s extensive system of roads, highways and bridges provides the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. This transportation system forms the backbone that supports the state’s economy. California’s surface transportation system enables the state’s residents and visitors to travel to work and school, visit family and friends, and frequent tourist and recreation attractions while providing its businesses with reliable access to customers, materials, suppliers and employees.

As California looks to retain its businesses, maintain its level of economic competitiveness and achieve further economic growth, the state will need to maintain and modernize its roads, highways and bridges by improving the physical condition of its transportation network and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient and reliable mobility for motorists and businesses. Making needed improvements to California’s roads, highways and bridges could also provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long term economic growth as a result of enhanced mobility and access.

With a current unemployment rate of 7.4 percent and with the state’s population continuing to grow, California must improve its system of roads, highways and bridges to foster economic growth and keep businesses in the state. In addition to economic growth, transportation improvements are needed to ensure safe, reliable mobility and quality of life for all Californians. Meeting California’s need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways and bridges will require a significant boost in local, state and federal funding.

Congress will need to pass new legislation prior to the May 31 extension expiration to ensure prompt federal reimbursements to states for road, highway, bridge and transit repairs and improvements.

The level of funding and the provisions of the federal surface transportation program have a significant impact on highway and bridge conditions, roadway safety, transit service, quality of life and economic development opportunities in California.

An inadequate transportation system costs California residents a total of $44 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • TRIP estimates that California roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have poor pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $44 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear), the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.
  • TRIP has calculated the average cost to drivers in the state’s largest urban areas as a result of driving on roads that are deteriorated, congested and lacking some desirable safety features. The chart below details the costs to drivers in the Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco-Oakland and San Jose urban areas.

CBE1Population and economic growth in California have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • California’s population reached approximately 38 million residents in 2012, a 28 percent increase since 1990. California had 24,200,997 licensed drivers in 2012.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in California increased by 26 percent from 1990 to 2012 – from 259 billion VMT in 1990 to 326 billion VMT in 2012.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in California is projected to increase by another 20 percent.
  • From 1990 to 2012, California’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 45 percent, when adjusted for inflation.

A lack of adequate state and local funding has resulted in more than one-third of major roads and highways in California having pavement surfaces in poor condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorist in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC).

  • Thirty-four percent of California’s major roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, while an additional 41 percent of the state’s major roads are rated in mediocre or fair condition and the remaining 25 percent are rated in in good condition.
  • Roads rated in poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes. In some cases, poor roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • Driving on rough roads costs all California motorists a total of $17 billion annually in extra VOC. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • The chart below details the percentage of major roads in poor, mediocre, fair and good condition in the state’s major urban areas:

CBE 2Twenty-eight percent of locally and state-maintained bridges in California show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Eleven percent of California’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Seventeen percent of California’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Improving safety features on California’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • Between 2008 and 2012 a total of 14,878 people were killed in traffic crashes in California, an average of 2,976 fatalities per year.
  • California’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.88 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012 is lower than the national traffic fatality rate of 1.13.
  • The fatality rate on California’s rural non-Interstate roads was 2.61 fatalities per 100 vehicle miles of travel in 2012, more than four times the 0.63 fatality rate on all other roads and highways in the state.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in California, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer. 

  • Increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers and can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company to consider expansion or even to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for drivers and employees, and higher consumer costs.
  • The chart below details the average annual number of hours lost to congestion by each motorist in California’s largest urban areas, as well as the annual congestion cost per driver in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. 

CBE 3The efficiency of California’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses are increasingly reliant on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $1.34 trillion in goods are shipped from sites in California and another $1.28 trillion in goods are shipped to sites in California, mostly by truck.
  • Sixty-seven percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in California are carried by trucks and another 20 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number one site selection factor in a 2011 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.
  • A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

The federal government is a critical source of funding for California’s roads, highways and bridges and provides a significant return in road and bridge funding based on the revenue generated in the state by the federal motor fuel tax.

  • From 2008 to 2012, the federal government provided $1.32 for road improvements in California for every dollar the state paid in federal motor fuel fees.  

Sources of information for this report include the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). All data used in the report is the latest available.

 

Caltrans Honored as Pavement Pioneer for Long-Life Asphalt

napalogoInnovative Long-Life Asphalt Pavement Projects
on Interstate 5 in Northern California Highlighted in National Award.

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) has been recognized with a national Pavement Pioneer Award for the innovative long-life asphalt pavement projects recently constructed on Interstate 5 in Northern California.

The award was presented to Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty at the California Asphalt Pavement Association (CalAPA) Fall Asphalt Pavement Conference in Sacramento. Mike Acott, president of the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA), presented the award on behalf of the Asphalt Pavement Alliance (APA), a national organziation supported by NAPA, the Asphalt Institute, and state asphalt pavement associations, including CalAPA.

“The Pavement Pioneer Award recognizes agencies that utilize innovative designs, materials, and methods to deliver durable asphalt roads that are high-quality, long-lasting, and an outstanding value for the taxpayer,” Acott said.

The Pavement Pioneer Award recognizes the department’s headquarters Pavement branch and the regional office in Redding for their work to deliver two long-life asphalt pavement projects. Long-life asphalt pavement, also known as Perpetual Pavement, is a special asphalt pavement design methodology characterized by a deeper base that has been shown to last for decades with only minimal maintenance to the surface layer.

“For the past 12 years, the Perpetual Pavement Award program has recognized agencies for existing pavements that have continued to perform well beyond 40, 50, 60 years. But Caltrans is are building pavements today that will win a Perpetual Pavement Award in future decades,” said Mike Kvach, Executive Director of the Asphalt Pavement Alliance.

National Asphalt Pavement Association President Mike Acott (left) and California Asphalt Pavement Association Executive Director Russell Snyder (right) present the Pavement Pioneer Award to Caltrans Maintenance Chief Tony Tavares

National Asphalt Pavement Association President Mike Acott (left) and California Asphalt Pavement Association Executive Director Russell Snyder (right) present the Pavement Pioneer Award to Caltrans Maintenance Chief Tony Tavares

Generally pavements must be in place for more than 30 years to receive an APA Perpetual Pavement Award, but CalAPA and the APA honored Caltrans for the way it moved forward aggressively with the durable pavement strategy not only on the Interstate 5 projects but also on Interstate 710 in Los Angeles County and Interstate 80 between San Francisco and Sacramento. Caltrans’ pioneering work with durable, long-life pavements has received national attention.

“With the Pavement Pioneer Award,” said Kvach, “we are recognizing agencies actively instituting the latest advancements in long-life pavement design.”

The first project, valued at $17.5 million, spanned a stretch of I‑5 in Siskiyou County near the community of Weed. The second project, valued at $31 million, covered a 15.5 mile stretch of I‑5 near Red Bluff. The projects were constructed in 2012 and 2013.

National Demolition Association’s Environmental Excellence Awards Salutes Projects in Seven U.S. States and Canada

NDA Logo Projects cleaned up hundreds of contaminated acres of land in Nevada, aided in the redevelopment of a Michigan city, remediated a former paper mill site, recycled lumber into bio-fuel, and lead to the reuse of reclaimed materials in high-profile new construction sites.

National Demolition Association (NDA) presented the 3nd annual Environmental Excellence Awards to five companies which have performed demolition projects that demonstrate significant environmental conservation and community improvement, while bringing about a discernible positive impact on the quality of life in the U.S. and Canada.

“The Environmental Excellence Awards recognize NDA member companies which are true leaders in environmental stewardship,” said Michael R. Taylor, CAE, Executive Director of the NDA.  “Environmental stewardship is one of the demolition industry’s primary missions and these winning projects help illustrate truly dramatic efforts our members have made to make this a reality.

The winning projects, which were honored at the National Demolition Association’s 40th Annual Convention in Las Vegas, are:

Project: Mohave Generating Station, Laughlin, NV

ncm-mohave1NDA Member: NCM Demolition & Remediation, Brea, CA

NCM is currently decommissioning Southern California Edison’s giant Mohave Generating Station in Laughlin, NV, just west of Las Vegas.  The power plant is a 1,580-MW, coal-fired electric generating station situated on 3,000 acres adjacent to the Colorado River.  The facility has 217 acres of storage ponds, evaporating ponds, and a 300-acre landfill.  The scope of NCM’s scope of services includes asset recovery, asbestos abatement, hazardous materials handling, structural demolition, relocations of pond contents, and closure of the on-site landfill 

 

 

Project:  Revitalizing the City of Saginaw, MI

NDA Member: Bierlein Companies, Inc., Midland, MI

Bierlein Companies-6Bierlein Companies partnered with AKT Peerless Environmental and Energy Services to reform environmental remediation and demolition services at the Downtown Saginaw Redevelopment Project.  The scope of the project included the demolition of the eight-story Crowne Plaza Hotel and the adjacent 160,000-sq.-ft. Downtown Saginaw Mall.  The work also included abatement of 200,000 sq. ft. of asbestos material and universal waste removal.  Some 98% of the building materials onsite were recycled.

 

 

 

Project:  Plymouth Cordage Mill #2 Demolition and Recycling, Plymouth, MA

NDA Member:  Costello Dismantling Co., West Wareham, MA

Costello Dismantling Co3During the demolition of the Plymouth Cordage Mill in Plymouth, MA, Costello Dismantling was looking for innovative ways to recycle high-quality Southern Yellow Pine beams and structural decking in the building that have been exposed to more than a century of saturation from mineral oil used to condition hemp fibers prior to rope manufacturing.  After rigorous testing, sorting and shredding, the lumber was converted into 4,500 tons of bio-fuel.

 

 

 

Project:  Gaspesia Pulp and Paper Mill, Chandler, QC, Canada

NDA Member: EDS, Montreal, QC, Canada

Microsoft Word - NDA.docxEDS received a turnkey contract to dismantle and pack all process equipment; to perform the complete remediation of all contaminated materials; to remediate and decontaminate the entire site; to complete the demolition of all buildings and other structures on the site; and to recycle all of the structural steel and non-ferrous metals on site.  The object of the work was to provide the local community with a remediated site and green area for future park and golf course development.

 

 

 

Project: Reuse and Recycling in Projects in KS, MO, NY, UT

planetreuse2NDA Member: PlanetReuse, Kansas City, MO

The goal of PlanetReuse’s projects is to increase the reuse of reclaimed materials in a way that is beneficial to the owners, the demolition and recycling industries, and the end users.  Examples include the reuse of 86,000 sq. ft. of cypress, reclaimed hemlock, Douglas fir, and pine/spruce in a school in Greensburg, KS; the use of reclaimed material for the exterior walls of Kansas City’s Kaufman Center of the Performing Arts and bridges in Utah; 10,000 sq. ft. of oak flooring from a restaurant in Kansas City’s Power & Light District which was processed for reuse as flooring in two new retail project; and recycled portion of President Obama’s inauguration state into framing and walls for the Omega Institute for Sustainable Living in Rhinebeck, NY.

 

About the National Demolition Association

The National Demolition Association is a non-profit trade organization representing approximately 800 U.S. and Canadian companies and many international firms that are involved in the demolition process. Membership includes demolition contractors, general contractors, civil engineering firms, and recycling, landfill, and salvage operations.  The association’s efforts help members stay abreast of environmental, regulatory and safety matters, keep regulators informed about issues facing the industry, increase public and industry awareness, and provide members with networking opportunities and information on the latest technical advances in equipment and services.  The website is www.demolitionassociation.com.