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TRIP Report: JACKSON , MS AREA DRIVERS WASTE MORE THAN $1,500 EACH YEAR DRIVING ON DEFICIENT ROADS – A TOTAL OF $1.6 BILLION STATEWIDE. SIXTY-EIGHT PERCENT OF JACKSON AREA MAJOR ROADS NEED IMPROVEMENT, MORE THAN ONE FIFTH OF MISSISSIPPI BRIDGES NEED REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT

TRIPMore than two-thirds of Jackson’s major locally and state-maintained roads are in either poor or mediocre condition, more than one fifth of the state’s bridges need repair or replacement, and Mississippi’s drivers experience growing congestion and delays. In addition to deteriorated roads and bridges, Mississippi’s rural roads have a significantly higher traffic fatality rate than all other roads in the state. Increased investment in transportation improvements could improve road and bridge conditions, ease congestion, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Mississippi, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization. The TRIP report, Mississippi Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility,” provides data on key transportation facts and figures in the state.

 

$1.6 billion

TRIP estimates that Mississippi roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have poor pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $1.6 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion and traffic crashes.

$1,506

$1,272

Driving on roads that are congested, deteriorated and that lack some desirable safety features costs the average Jackson area driver $1,506 annually. In the Gulfport/Biloxi area, the average driver loses $1,272 each year.

28%

68%

46%

Twenty-eight percent of Mississippi’s roads are either in poor or mediocre condition.  Sixty-eight percent of Jackson-area major locally and state- maintained urban roads are in poor or mediocre condition. In the Gulfport/Biloxi area, 46 percent of major urban roads are in poor or mediocre condition.

728

3,638

5th

From 2007 to 2011, an average of 728 people were killed annually in Mississippi traffic crashes, a total of 3,638 fatalities.  Mississippi’s traffic fatality rate of 1.62 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2011 was the fifth highest level nationally.

 

2X

The fatality rate on Mississippi’s non-interstate rural roads is more than double that on all other roads in the state (2.27 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.99).

 

22 %

A total of 22 percent of Mississippi bridges are in need of repair, improvement or replacement. Fourteen percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient and eight percent are functionally obsolete.

59 %

35 %

Vehicle miles of travel in Mississippi increased 59 percent from 1990 to 2011 and are expected to increase another 35 percent by 2030.

$470 million

If a lack of adequate revenue into the Federal Highway Trust Fund is not addressed by Congress, funding for highway and transit improvements in Mississippi could be cut by $470 million for the federal fiscal year beginning October 1, 2014.

 

$1.27

51%

 

From 2007 to 2011, the federal government provided $1.27 for road improvements in Mississippi for every one dollar paid in federal motor fuel fees.   From 2007 to 2011, federal revenues accounted for 51 percent of state spending on Mississippi’s roads, highways and bridges.

 

$1.00 = $5.20

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced roadway maintenance costs, and reduced emissions.

Mississippi roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have poor pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $1.6 billion each year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion, and traffic crashes. Driving on roads that are congested, deteriorated and that lack some desirable safety features costs the average Jackson area driver $1,506 annually and the average Gulfport/Biloxi area driver $1,272 annually.

“This study is further evidence that Mississippi’s roads and bridges are deteriorating at an alarming rate,” said House Transportation Chairman Robert Johnson. “The effects of weather and heavy traffic on our roadways is becoming a public safety issue that the legislature cannot ignore. Improving our transportation infrastructure is not only vital for public safety concerns, it directly impacts Mississippi’s ability to attract new businesses and retain existing industries. Our future economy depends on it.”

Growing traffic congestion, particularly in the state’s urban areas, threatens to choke commuting and commerce. The average commuter in the Jackson metro area loses 25 additional hours each year stuck in traffic due to traffic congestion and the average commuter in the Gulfport/Biloxi metro area loses 24 additional hours each year stuck in traffic due to traffic congestion.

Traffic crashes in Mississippi claimed the lives of 3,638 people between 2007 and 2011. The state’s 2011 traffic fatality rate of 1.62 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel (VMT) is significantly higher than the national average of 1.10 fatalities per 100 million VMT and was the fifth highest among all states, behind only Montana (1.79), West Virginia (1.78), South Carolina (1.70) and Arkansas (1.67). The traffic fatality rate in 2011 on Mississippi’s non-Interstate rural roads was 2.27 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel, more than double the 0.99 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel on all other roads and highways in the state. Roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes. Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion.

“These key transportation numbers in Mississippi add up to trouble for the state’s residents in terms of deteriorated roads and bridges, reduced traffic safety and constrained economic development,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP.  “Improving road and bridge conditions, improving traffic safety and providing a transportation system that will support economic development in Mississippi will require a significant boost in state and federal funding for road, highway and bridge improvements.”

Executive Summary

Mississippi’s extensive system of roads, highways and bridges provides the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. This transportation system forms the backbone that supports the state’s economy. Mississippi’s surface transportation system enables the state’s residents and visitors to travel to work and school, visit family and friends, and frequent tourist and recreation attractions while providing its businesses with reliable access to customers, materials, suppliers and employees.

As Mississippi looks to retain its businesses, maintain its level of economic competitiveness and achieve further economic growth, the state will need to maintain and modernize its roads, highways and bridges by improving the physical condition of its transportation network and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient and reliable mobility for motorists and businesses. Making needed improvements to Mississippi’s roads, highways and bridges could also provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long term economic growth as a result of enhanced mobility and access.

With a current unemployment rate of 8.5 percent and with the state’s population continuing to grow, Mississippi must improve its system of roads, highways and bridges to foster economic growth and keep businesses in the state. In addition to economic growth, transportation improvements are needed to ensure safe, reliable mobility and quality of life for all Mississippians. Meeting Mississippi’s need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways and bridges will require a significant boost in local, state and federal funding.Signed into law in July 2012, MAP-21(Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21Century Act), will fund surface transportation programs in Mississippi at an average of $469 million annually for fiscal years 2013 and 2014.

Signed into law in July 2012, MAP-21 (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act), will fund surface transportation programs in Mississippi at an average of $469 million annually for fiscal years 2013 and 2014.

While the new federal surface transportation program has improved several procedures that in the past had delayed projects, MAP-21 does not address long-term funding challenges facing the federal surface transportation program. As a result, nationwide federal funding for highways will be cut by almost 100 percent from the current investment level for the fiscal year starting on October 1, 2014 (FY 2015) unless Congress provides additional transportation revenues. This is due to a cash shortfall in the Highway Trust Fund as projected by the Congressional Budget Office.

The level of funding and the provisions of the federal surface transportation program have a significant impact on highway and bridge conditions, roadway safety, transit service, quality of life and economic development opportunities in Mississippi.

An inadequate transportation system costs Mississippi residents a total of $1.6 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • TRIP estimates that Mississippi roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have poor pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $1.6 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion and traffic crashes.
  • TRIP has calculated the annual cost to Mississippi residents of driving on roads that are deteriorated, congested and lack some desirable safety features both statewide and in the state’s largest urban area. The following chart shows the cost breakdown for these areas.

Population and economic growth in Mississippi have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Mississippi’s population reached nearly 3 million in 2012, a 16 percent increase since 1990. Mississippi had 1,926,603 licensed drivers in 2011.
  • Vehicle miles traveled in Mississippi increased by 59 percent from 1990 to 2011 – jumping from 24.4 billion vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in 1990 to 38.9 billion VMT in 2011.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Mississippi is projected to increase by another 35 percent.
  • From 1990 to 2011, Mississippi’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 47 percent, when adjusted for inflation.

Twenty-eight percent of major locally and state-maintained roads and highways in Mississippi have pavement surfaces in poor or mediocre condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorist in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

•           Eight percent of Mississippi’s major roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, while an additional 20 percent of the state’s major roads are rated in mediocre condition. Twenty percent are rated in fair condition and the remaining 52 percent are rated in good condition.

  • The pavement data in this report for all arterial roads and highways is provided by the Federal Highway Administration, based on data submitted annually by the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways in the state.
  • In the Jackson urban area, 45 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads are rated in poor condition and 23 percent are rated in mediocre condition. Twelve percent of Jackson’s major urban roads are rated in fair condition and 21 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Twenty-nine percent of major locally and state-maintained roads in the Gulfport/Biloxi area are rated in poor condition and 17 percent are rated in mediocre condition. Sixteen percent of major urban roads in the Gulfport/Biloxi are rated in fair condition and 38 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Roads rated in poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes. In some cases, poor roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed. Roads rated in mediocre condition may show signs of significant wear and may also have some visible pavement distress. Most pavements in mediocre condition can be repaired by resurfacing, but some may need more extensive reconstruction to return them to good condition.
  • Driving on rough roads costs Mississippi motorists a total of $627 million annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Driving on rough roads costs the average Jackson motorist $741 annually in extra vehicle operating costs. In the Gulfport/Biloxi area, the average driver loses $531each year as a result of driving on deteriorated roads.

More than one-fifth of locally and state-maintained bridges in Mississippi show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Fourteen percent of Mississippi’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Eight percent of Mississippi’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Significant levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Mississippi, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce.

  • According to the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the average driver in the Jackson urban area loses $594 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion. The average commuter in the Jackson urban spends an additional 25 hours per year stuck in traffic as a result of traffic congestion.
  • TTI estimates that the average driver in the Gulfport/Biloxi urban area loses $522 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion. The average commuter in the Gulfport/Biloxi urban spends an additional 24 hours each year stuck in traffic as a result of traffic congestion.

Mississippi’s traffic fatality rate on rural, non-Interstate routes is more than double that on all other roads and highways in the state. Improving safety features on Mississippi’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. Roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • Between 2007 and 2011 a total of 3,638 people were killed in traffic crashes in Mississippi, an average of 728 fatalities per year.
  • Mississippi’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.62 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2011 is higher than the national average of 1.10, the fifth highest level nationally.
  • The fatality rate on Mississippi’s rural non-Interstate roads was 2.27 fatalities per 100 vehicle miles of travel in 2011, more than double the 0.99 fatality rate in 2011 on all other roads and highways in the state.
  • The cost of serious traffic crashes in Mississippi in 2011 in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor was approximately $573 million.
  • In the Jackson urban area, the cost of serious traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor is approximately $171 annually per motorist. The cost of serious traffic crashes in the Gulfport/Biloxi area in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor is approximately $219 per motorist.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior). TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

The efficiency of Mississippi’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses are increasingly reliant on an efficient and reliable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $91 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Mississippi and another $104 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Mississippi, mostly by truck.
  • Seventy-seven percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Mississippi are carried by trucks and another four percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number one site selection factor in a 2011 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • A 2013 report by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association found that the $1.4 billion spent annually on road, highway and bridge construction and maintenance in Mississippi supports approximately 37,000 full-time jobs, including approximately 18,400 jobs in transportation construction and related activities and approximately 18,600 jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

The federal government remains a critical source of funding for Mississippi’s roads, highways and bridges and provides a significant return to Mississippi in road and bridge funding based on the revenue generated in the state by the federal motor fuel tax.

  • The MAP-21 program, approved by Congress in July 2012, greatly increased funding flexibility for states and streamlined project approval processes to improve the efficiency of state and local transportation agencies in providing needed transportation improvements in the state.
  • MAP-21 does not provide sufficient long-term revenues to support the current level of federal surface transportation investment. Nationwide federal funding for highways is expected to be cut by almost 100 percent from the current investment level for the fiscal year starting October 1, 2014 (FY 2015) unless Congress provides additional transportation revenues. This is due to a cash shortfall in the Highway Trust Fund as projected by the Congressional Budget Office.
  • If the funding shortfalls into the federal Highway Trust Fund are addressed solely by cutting spending it is estimated that federal funding for highway and transit improvements in Mississippi will be cut by $470 million for the federal fiscal year starting October 1, 2014, unless Congress provides additional transportation revenues.
  • From 2007 to 2011, the federal government provided $1.27 for road improvements in Mississippi for every one dollar paid in federal motor fuel fees.
  • From 2007 to 2011, federal revenues accounted for 51 percent of state spending on Mississippi’s roads, highways and bridges.

Sources of information for this report include the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). 

Veterans as a Valuable Resource, Feature Article, August 2013 ACP Magazines

Helmets to Hardhats-1Helmets to Hardhats-2

Fifth Circuit Expected to Soon Rule on Constitutionality of Mississippi’s Stop Notice Statute

This article appeared in June 2013 Construction News

By Dorsey R. Carson, Jr. and Christopher D. Meyer, Burr & Forman LLP

The constitutionality of the Mississippi Stop Notice statute, Miss. Code Ann. § 85-7-181, has now been challenged; leaving it possible that unpaid subcontractors and suppliers will be completely without any legal remedy against an owner in Mississippi.  Specifically, in Noatex Corporation v. King Construction of Houston, LLC, 884 F.Supp.2d 478 (N.D.Miss. 2012), Mississippi’s Stop Notice statute was ruled unconstitutional by a federal court.  That issue is now on appeal before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit sitting in New Orleans.  The Fifth Circuit is expected to soon rule on whether unpaid subcontractors and suppliers have any lien rights on construction projects in Mississippi.

Unlike most if not all other states, Mississippi limits lien rights on construction projects to prime contractors and others having a direct contract with the owner.  Therefore, subcontractors and suppliers who provide labor and materials to construction projects cannot “lien the project” to protect their payment rights.  Stated differently, except in certain limited situations, unpaid subcontractors and suppliers in Mississippi are not allowed to file a lien on real property.

Instead, the Mississippi Stop Notice statute, Miss. Code Ann. § 85-7-181, allows an unpaid subcontractor or supplier to “lien the funds.”  The Mississippi Stop Notice statute provides that if an unpaid subcontractor, laborer or materialman of the prime contractor provides written notice to the owner of the amount it is owned, from that date forward that amount is bound in the owner’s hands until the claim is resolved (or, if the amount in the owner’s hands is less than the amount owed, then the entire amount remaining in the owner’s hands is bound).  The statutory notice necessary to lien the funds is known as a “stop notice.”

In Noatex Corporation v. King Construction of Houston, LLC, 884 F.Supp.2d 478 (N.D.Miss. 2012), Noatex, a general contractor, brought a declaratory judgment action against King Construction, a subcontractor on a project to construct a manufacturing plant, seeking to have King Construction’s “stop notice” claim and the statute authorizing it declared unconstitutional.  Noatex and King Construction worked together from February through June 2011, but then, after Noatex began to question the validity of King Construction’s invoices, King Construction filed a stop notice with the project owner, binding just over a quarter of a million dollars. Noatex argued that the stop notice statute violated its due process rights by depriving it of property without proper procedures for notice and hearing.

The federal district court agreed and declared the statute unconstitutional, both facially and as applied, for violating due process. The federal district court compared the statutory scheme, which allowed an unpaid subcontractor to bind monies allegedly owed with the owner solely by simply filing a notice, to a prejudgment attachment of the type, which had previously been declared unconstitutional.  According to the federal district court, a traditional mechanic’s lien clouds title but does not alienate property, and other states’ comparable statutes that have been upheld all provide either notice and a hearing or other safeguards, such as affidavits and security bonds, to minimize the risk of wrongful withholding.

According to the federal district court, Mississippi’s alternative offered no immediate process by which to judge the validity of the stop notice or challenge it until a trial on the merits.  Although the federal district court acknowledged the beneficent aims of the statute, it also recognized that stop notices often had the effect of compounding nonpayment and stopping projects.

The federal district court’s decision is currently on appeal before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  The Mississippi State Board of Contractors and the Homebuilders Association of Mississippi filed amici (“friend of the court”) briefs, and briefing by all parties to the Fifth Circuit was completed on December 26, 2012.

An opinion from the Fifth Circuit is expected to come down in the near future.  Subcontractors and suppliers performing work and supplying material in Mississippi are cautiously awaiting the ruling in hopes that the federal court’s decision will be reversed.  Until then, the status of the Mississippi Stop Notice statute remains in limbo.  Subcontractors and suppliers doing business in Mississippi need to be aware of the unique difficulties in collecting payment in Mississippi, and should seek joint checks and other contractual provisions to protect against non-payment.

Major Wire Names Kirby-Smith Machinery, Inc. New Dealer

Montreal-based Major Wire Industries Limited has named Kirby-Smith Machinery, Inc. as its new Authorized Dealer for aggregate, asphalt and recycle operations in Eastern Kansas, Oklahoma and Northern Texas. The dealership offers all of Major Wire’s screen media solutions, including the advanced technology Flex-Mat® 3 Self-Cleaning Screen Media in tensioned and modular versions and OptimumWire® Woven Wire. For more than 30 years, Kirby-Smith has specialized in a wide range of quality products known for their dependability and performance, and backed by manufacturers’ support. With 9 locations the company can quickly meet the screen media needs of their customers.

Kirby-Smith Machinery Named Major Wire Dealer“Kirby-Smith makes customer service a top priority,” states Gary Pederson, Major Wire Vice President of Sales. “In addition to their full staff of service personnel working with customers on-site, they also offer seminars throughout the year to help their customers stay on top of industry changes and advancements. Their dedication to providing customers with superior service and expertise fits perfectly with the value-added programs offered by Major Wire, including on-site Screening Plant Audits, Screen Maintenance Seminars and our Flex-Mat 3 Results Guaranteed Program.”

Major Wire’s advanced Flex-Mat 3 High-Performance, Self-Cleaning Screen Media is available in a tensioned version as an alternative to traditional woven wire and a modular version designed to replace polyurethane and rubber modular screen panels. Independently vibrating wires increase product throughput by up to 40 percent over traditional woven wire or polyurethane panels by increasing screening action and open area and eliminating blinding, pegging and clogging.

Major Wire’s OptimumWire Woven Wire has a unique chemical makeup that provides up to 40 percent longer wear life when compared to traditional woven wire of the same diameter. Delivering the industry’s best combination of ductility, hardness and tensile strength, OptimumWire is less susceptible to breaking in high-impact conditions and with highly abrasive materials, so it lasts longer and minimizes labor, maintenance and lost production costs.

“We add value to our customers by going the extra mile,” states David Baker, Vice President of Parts & Service at Kirby-Smith. “One of our salesman has over 30 years of experience selling screen media and introduced us to the product line. It didn’t take long for us to realize that Major Wire was a great fit for our company and customers. Major Wire screen media increases production and our customers like that.”

For more information about Kirby-Smith  visit www.kirby-smith.com.

 

For more information on Major Wire  visit Major Wire’s website at www.majorwire.cc.

ABC Names Cajun Industries 2012 Contractor of the Year

image005Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) has named Cajun Industries, LLC, Baton Rouge, La., its 2012 Contractor of the Year. Cajun Industries Founder and Chairman, Lane Grigsby, accepted the award on behalf of the company during ABC’s 23rd annual Excellence in Construction and National Safety Excellence Award program held Feb. 20 at the Harbor Beach Marriott in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

“Each year, ABC recognizes an individual or company that attains a level of achievement that raises the bar for all of us, and Cajun Industries certainly fits the bill,” said 2013 ABC National Chairman Greg Hoberock, president of hth companies, Inc. Union, Mo.  “Their commitment to safety and excellence on all levels helps to advance our organization, the construction industry and the principles of free enterprise.”

2013 COTY - CajunCajun Industries was founded in 1973 by Lane Grigsby as Cajun Contractors and Engineers to capitalize on his extensive experience in the heavy civil/industrial phases of the construction industry. Today, the company is called Cajun Industries and includes five companies under one holding company, which allows Cajun Industries to concentrate on specialized areas important to their customers, including construction, deep foundations, maritime and equipment services.

Cajun Industries provides a broad range of services to various markets, including government, water quality, manufacturing and industrial. The company is licensed or permitted to perform construction in 24 states.

The company has been involved with ABC since 1974. Cajun Industries is a member of three ABC chapters, including the ABC New Orleans/Bayou chapter, ABC Pelican chapter and the ABC Greater Houston chapter.