Monthly Archive for October, 2010

TRIP Report: Alabama’s 40 Worst Highway & Transit Chokepoints Identified

Chokepoints Lengthen Commutes, Stifle Economic Development And Reduce Quality Of Life Throughout The State –

The I-10 Wallace Tunnels in Mobile top the list of Alabama’s worst transportation chokepoints, along with multiple sections of I-65, I-20 and I-85.  This is according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research organization.

TRIP’s report, “Alabama’s Transportation Chokepoints: The Top 40 Chokepoints and Remedies for Relief,” ranks the state’s urban interchanges, highway segments, transit routes, and sections of rural highways that provide inadequate mobility. These transportation chokepoints impede local, regional or interstate travel, diminish the quality of life of residents and visitors, reduce economic competitiveness, and stifle economic growth and recovery by hampering commuting, commerce and other travel. In addition to identifying the chokepoints, the report also offers potential improvements for each segment that would ease the burden on travelers and allow for improved mobility.

According to the TRIP report, the worst transportation chokepoint in Alabama is the I-10 Wallace Tunnels under the Mobile River in Mobile County. The state’s most severe chokepoints also include the following: I-65 from I-20 to US 31 in Jefferson County, US 280 from Brook Highland Parkway to Riverview Road in Jefferson County, I-65 from SR 119 to I-459 in Jefferson and Shelby Counties, US 280 from Cahaba River Road / Dolly Ridge Road to Cherokee Drive in Jefferson County, I-65 from Airport Boulevard to Springhill Avenue in Mobile County, I-65 from County Road 52 to State Road 119 in Shelby County, I-20 from Airport Highway to US 31 in Jefferson County, Birmingham’s regional transit system, and I-85 from I-65 to Taylor Road in Montgomery County. The report’s appendix contains a full list of the 40 worst chokepoints in the state as well as possible solutions to ease each chokepoint.

“In addition to causing a headache for motorists, Alabama’s transportation chokepoints stifle economic development and growth at a time when it is desperately needed. Alabama can’t get where it needs to go – in both a literal and an economic sense – without an efficient transportation system” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP.

As part of reversing the current economic downturn and facilitating long-term economic growth, Alabama will need to address its numerous surface transportation chokepoints.  Enhancing critical segments of Alabama’s surface transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields.  In the long term, these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness by improving access and mobility, which will stimulate sustained job growth and improve the quality of life in Alabama.

Making needed improvements to the state’s transportation system can help boost Alabama’s economy. The state’s unemployment rate increased from 3.5 percent in August 2007 to 9.2 percent in August 2010. A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.

The Federal Highway Administration also estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

“One of the most important aspects of improving our highways and bridges is safety,” said Clay Ingram, AAA Alabama spokesperson. “Increasing mobility and reducing congestion is also important, but saving lives is the best investment we can make for the motorists of Alabama.

video Link:

http://www.myfoxal.com/global/category.asp?c=195956&autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=5238022&flvUri=&partnerclipid=

Alabama’s Transportation Chokepoints:

The Top 40 Chokepoints and Remedies for Relief

October 2010

Executive Summary

The ease with which residents, visitors and businesses can access desired destinations has a significant impact on a region’s economic well-being and quality of life. A reasonable level of mobility provides tremendous freedom in accessing activities and opportunities, and choosing where to live, work, play and shop

When a transportation facility, including a roadway segment, an interchange, or a transit route, cannot meet the demand for reliable mobility, it chokes local, regional or interstate travel, diminishes the quality of life of residents and visitors, and reduces business productivity.

Continued growth in Alabama’s population and travel is straining the capacity of the state’s surface transportation system and impeding quality of life by hampering commuting, commerce and other travel.

In this report, TRIP looks at the impact of growth on the state’s surface transportation system and the potential consequences if Alabama is unable to make needed improvements to provide a level of mobility adequate to meet the needs of a growing state.

As part of facilitating long-term economic growth, Alabama will need to address its numerous surface transportation chokepoints. Enhancing critical segments of Alabama’s surface transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness by improving access and mobility, which will stimulate sustained job growth, improving the quality of life for all Alabamans.

This report identifies Alabama’s 40 worst surface transportation chokepoints. Addressing these chokepoints will be critical to maintaining the state’s high quality of life by improving mobility, reducing delays, enhancing environmental quality and supporting economic growth. The major findings of the report are:

Alabama’s quality of life and economic productivity are being reduced by chokepoints in the state’s surface transportation system. These chokepoints include major roads, highways and public transit routes that impede routine travel, commuting or commerce, or that place limits on economic development opportunities because of out-dated design or lack of adequate capacity.

  • Alabama’s top 40 surface transportation chokepoints include urban interchanges and highway segments, public transit routes and sections of rural highways that are unable to meet a region’s need for adequate mobility. This constraint on reliable transportation harms business productivity and reduces access to housing, employment, recreation, entertainment and social functions.
  • A list of Alabama’s top 20 surface transportation chokepoints is included in the report. Additional information on the state’s top 40 surface transportation chokepoints, including needed improvements, can be found in the appendix.
  • TRIP ranked Alabama’s top 40 surface transportation chokepoints by assigning each chokepoint an overall score based on the following factors: volume of daily travel or ridership; the severity of the congestion or crowding; the importance of the route or facility to local, regional and interstate travel; whether a route or facility provided mobility to non-motorists; and the impact of the chokepoint on overall quality of life in a region, including environmental and economic impact.

The top ten surface transportation chokepoints in Alabama are:

1. Interstate 10 Wallace Tunnel under the Mobile River in Mobile County. Traffic leading to the tunnel backs up daily, with back-ups on holidays often stretching for miles, including Labor Day in 2010, when the back-up was 16 miles long. Carrying 66,000 vehicles per day, Interstate 10 at the tunnel narrows from eight-lanes to four-lanes. Interstate 10 serves as a critical east-west link, stretching from California to Florida. A planned six-lane Interstate 10 bridge over the Mobile River would greatly relieve this chokepoint. The project is currently in the environmental review process.

2.  Interstate 65 from Interstate 20 to US 31 in Jefferson County. This section of Interstate 65, which carries 142,000 vehicles per day, is heavily congested, particularly at the University Boulevard, Green Springs Highway and West Oxmoor interchanges, with travel speeds during rush hour averaging 35 miles per hour versus 55 miles per hour during non-peak hours. This route, which is a critical corridor in and out of downtown Birmingham, could be improved with modifications to its key interchanges.

3. US Highway 280 from Brook Highland Parkway to Riverview Road in Jefferson County. This critical commuter route in the Southeast portion of the Birmingham urban area, carrying 84,000 vehicles daily, is heavily congested, with speeds often decreasing to under 20 miles per hour during peak hours versus 55 miles per hour during non-peak hours. Congestion at this chokepoint could be relieved with improvements to parallel routes and improved transit service in this corridor.

4. Interstate 65 from State Road 119 to Interstate 459 in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. This section of Interstate 65, which carries 110,000 vehicles per day, is heavily congested, particularly at the State Road 119 and Interstate 459 interchanges, with travel speeds during rush hour averaging 45 miles per hour versus 60 miles per hour during non-peak hours. This route, which is a critical corridor in Birmingham’s southern suburbs including the city of Hoover, could be improved with modifications to its key interchanges.

5. US Highway 280 from Cahaba River Road/Dolly Ridge Road to Cherokee Drive in Jefferson County. This critical commuter route in the Southeast portion of the Birmingham urban area, carrying 75,000 vehicles daily, is heavily congested, with speeds often decreasing to under 20 miles per hour during peak hours versus 55 miles per hour during non-peak hours. Congestion at this chokepoint could be relieved with improvements to parallel routes and improved transit service in this corridor.

6. Interstate 65 from Airport Boulevard to Springhill Avenue in Mobile County. This section of Interstate 65, which carries 99,000 vehicles per day, experiences significant congestion each morning and early evening as Interstate travelers, large trucks and commuters converge. The construction of an outer highway loop on the western part of the region would alleviate congestion at this chokepoint.

7. Interstate 65 from County Road 52 to State Road 119 in Shelby County. This section of Interstate 65, which carries 82,000 vehicles per day, is heavily congested, particularly at the County Road 52 and State Road 119 interchanges. This route, which is a critical corridor from downtown Birmingham to its southern suburbs, could be improved with modifications to its key interchanges.

8. Interstate 20 from Airport Boulevard to U.S. 280/U.S. 31 in Jefferson County. This section of Interstate 20, which carries 154,000 vehicles per day, experiences significant congestion, particularly as it approaches a merge with Interstate 59 and the interchange with Airport Highway.            This route, which is a critical corridor from downtown Birmingham to its eastern suburbs and for interstate travel and freight movement, could be improved with modifications to its key interchanges.

9.  The regional transit system for the Birmingham area. The level of service provided by the Birmingham-Jefferson County Transit Authority is inadequate to meet the mobility needs of the region, including the transportation needs of people without access to private vehicles. It is also inadequate to offer congestion relief on some of the area’s most choked transportation corridors. The average travel time between buses on the region’s 37 transit routes ranges from 60 to 90 minutes and daily ridership on the system is approximately 8,500. Increased service frequency and improved vehicle maintenance is needed to meet the region’s mobility needs. Services along some routes also need to be reconfigured to increase the efficiency of the system, which will attract additional ridership.

10. Interstate 85 from Interstate 65 to Taylor Road in Montgomery County. This section of Interstate 85, which carries 100,000 vehicles per day, experiences significant congestion, particularly as it approaches an interchange with Interstate 65. Congestion on this route, which is a critical east-west commuter corridor and also provides significant interstate travel and freight transportation, could be relieved by an improved interchange with Interstate 65, the construction of an outer highway loop in the region, and improved regional public transit service.

Increases in population, vehicle travel and economic activity in Alabama have outpaced improvements to the state’s roadway and transit system, resulting in increased congestion. Reduced transportation reliability may become an impediment to Alabama’s economic development and may have an adverse effect on tourism.

  • Between 1990 and 2008, vehicle travel in Alabama increased by 40 percent, from approximately 42 billion miles of travel to approximately 59 billion miles.
  • Between 1990 and 2010, Alabama’s population increased by 18 percent, from approximately 4 million to 4.8 million.
  • Population gains are expected to continue at a significant rate in Alabama, increasing by another 750,000 people to 5.6 million people in 2030, a 16 percent increase from 2010.
  • Despite the nation’s economic downturn, Alabama has experienced significant long-term economic growth. From 1990 to 2008, Alabama’s gross domestic product (GDP), increased by 45 percent when adjusted for inflation.
  • A report from the Reason Foundation found that traffic congestion in the Birmingham area is expected to more than double by 2030 unless the region’s transportation system is improved.
  • Trips in the Birmingham area take 15 percent longer to complete during rush hours, as compared to non-peak periods of the day. By 2030, the report found that unless major steps are taken to relieve traffic congestion in the Birmingham urban area, the average rush hour trip will take 32 percent longer to complete than during non-peak hours.
  • Approximately $183 billion in goods are shipped annually from sites in Alabama. Seventy-six percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Alabama are carried by trucks, another 10 percent are carried by courier services, which use trucks for part of the deliveries, and another 5 percent are delivered by a combination of truck and rail.

Sustaining Alabama’s long-term economic growth and maintaining the state’s high quality of life will require increased investment in expanding the capacity of the state’s surface transportation system, which will enhance business productivity and support short and long-term job creation in the state.

  • Surface transportation projects that improve the efficiency, condition or safety of a highway or transit route provide significant economic benefits by reducing transportation delays and costs associated with a deficient transportation system. The following are some of the benefits resulting from transportation improvements.

>Improved business competitiveness because of reduced production and distribution costs as a result of increased travel speeds and fewer mobility barriers.

>Improvements in household welfare as a result of better access to higher-paying jobs, a wider selection of competitively priced consumer goods, additional housing and healthcare options, and improved mobility for residents without access to private vehicles.

>Gains in local, regional and state economies as a result of improved regional economic competitiveness, which stimulates population and job growth.

>Increased leisure/tourism and business travel as a result of enhanced reliability of a region’s transportation system.

>A decrease in economic losses from traffic congestion in the form of delays and wasted fuel.

  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.
  • Making needed improvements to the state’s transportation system can help boost Alabama’s economy. A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • Alabama’s unemployment rate increased from 3.5 percent in August 2007 to 9.2 percent in August 2010.

In order to accommodate the continued growth in vehicle travel, without experiencing a significant increase in traffic congestion, Alabama will need to both expand the capacity of its roadway and transit systems and make further improvements in the efficiency of its existing transportation system.            These plans should continue to include and enhance the following.

  • Effectively increasing the transportation system through expanded road and highway capacity, improved freight movement corridors, improved public transit systems and enhanced sidewalks and bike paths.
  • Improving traffic flow and system efficiency through better traffic signalization, ramp metering, faster incident response times and driver information systems.
  • Implementing programs to reduce the number of peak-hour vehicle trips, including telecommuting, flextime and ridesharing programs.

The outcome of ongoing Congressional deliberations over a future federal surface transportation program will have a significant impact on Alabama’s ability to relieve many of its surface transportation chokepoints.

  • Federal spending levels for highways and public transit in Alabama are based on the current federal surface transportation program, the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act – A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), which was approved by Congress in 2005. The SAFETEA-LU program expires on December 31, 2010. Congress is currently deliberating over a long-range federal surface transportation program to follow SAFETEA-LU.

The full TRIP Alabama Report is available at www.tripnet.org

All data used in this report is the latest available. TRIP’s report is based on information obtained from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT), the Regional Planning Commission of Greater Birmingham, the City of Huntsville, the City of Montgomery, the South Alabama Regional Planning Commission, the U.S. Census Bureau, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the Urban Land Institute and the Reason Foundation.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood Announces 
$2.4 Billion For High Speed Rail Projects

Public Demand For High-Speed Rail Continues To Exceed 
Available Dollars In Latest Round Of Awards

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood today announced that 54 high-speed rail projects in 23 states will share in $2.4 billion to continue developing America’s first nationwide program of high-speed intercity passenger rail service.

The Department’s Federal Railroad Administration received 132 applications from 32 states totaling $8.8 billion, more than three times the $2.4 billion available. During the first round of awards in the fall of 2009, applicants submitted more than $55 billion in project proposals for the initial $8 billion from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

“Demand for high-speed rail dollars is intense and it demonstrates just how important this historic initiative is,” said Secretary LaHood. “States understand that high-speed rail represents a unique opportunity to create jobs, revitalize our manufacturing base, spur economic development and provide people with an environmentally friendly transportation option.”

More than 30 rail manufacturers and suppliers, both domestic and foreign, have agreed to establish or expand their bases of operations in the United States if they are hired to build America’s next generation high-speed lines, a commitment the Obama Administration secured to help ensure new jobs are created here at home.

Some award examples include:

California received more than $901 million, including $715 million for the construction of new high-speed rail lines in the Central Valley. The state has made significant investments in passenger rail that have led to remarkable ridership growth;

Florida received $800 million for the Tampa to Orlando high-speed rail corridor. The state’s long-term vision is for a high-speed rail line that connects Tampa, Orlando, Miami and other communities;

Iowa received $230 million to create a new intercity passenger rail service between Iowa City and Chicago through the Quad Cities. When completed, the service will form an integral part of the existing efforts to develop the Chicago Hub intercity rail system in the Midwest; and

Michigan received $161 million for a high-speed rail corridor connecting Detroit and Chicago, the two largest cities in the Midwest. The long-term vision for this corridor includes doubling the number of daily round trips between Detroit and Chicago.

The money is being awarded for a range of activities, such as construction of track and stations, purchase of new passenger equipment, and planning studies to develop new high-speed rail service.

“In the 20th century, our vision led to the interstate highway system,” said FRA Administrator Joe Szabo. “In the 21st century, our vision will give us a world-class network of high-speed passenger rail corridors.”

In addition to the $8 billion down payment from the Recovery Act, additional funding for high-speed rail has come from several sources. These include $95 million from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s FY 2009 appropriations and remaining money from a related FY 2008 appropriations program, and from the Department’s FY 2010 appropriations, which included at least $2.125 billion for high-speed rail service development programs, $245 million for individual projects and $50 million for planning and multi-state proposal activities.

A complete project list can be viewed at http://www.fra.dot.gov/rpd/passenger/2243.shtml

There is also more information on Secretary LaHood’s blog site where you can read more about today’s high-speed rail grant announcements at fastlane.dot.gov

TRIP Report for Mobile, AL, Media Advisory—New Time: 1pm

TRIP Report Identifies Alabama’s Top 40 Chokepoints & Strategies For Improvement

A new report that identifies the 40 worst chokepoints on Alabama’s roads, bridges and transit systems will be released in Mobile at 1 p.m. on Thursday, October 28.

TRIP will release a report titled, “Alabama’s Transportation Chokepoints: The Top 40 Chokepoints and Remedies for Relief.” It pinpoints the 40 segments of Alabama’s road, highway and transit systems that impede routine travel, commuting or commerce, or place limits on economic development because of deficient design or inadequate capacity. These chokepoints are located throughout the state, with many of them – including the worst chokepoint – in the Mobile area. TRIP is a national nonprofit transportation research group based in Washington, DC.

TRIP’s Carolyn Bonifas will present the findings of the report. Local officials will also be on hand to comment on the report.

TIME:              1 p.m.

DATE:            Thursday, October 28

PLACE:            301 N. Water Street

Mobile, AL (Parking available at Jordan Pile Driving)

WHO: Mike Dean, Mobile County Commissioner

Carolyn Bonifas, Associate Director of Research and Communication TRIP

CONTACT:   Carolyn Bonifas                                    703.801.9212 (cell)

Frank Moretti (TRIP)                        202.262.0714 (cell)

Unveiling of First Cat Vocational Truck at CONEXPO in March 2011

Caterpillar Inc. will unveil the first model in its full line of Cat Vocational Trucks, the Cat CT660, at CONEXPO on March 22, 2011. The Class 8 trucks will be sold and serviced exclusively through the Cat North American Dealer network, with production beginning after CONEXPO for customer delivery later in the year.

To develop its first line of trucks, Caterpillar leveraged its industry-leading technologies, extensive knowledge of worksite and operator environments gained from meeting the heavy equipment needs of a wide range of industries, and an unparalleled dedication to customer support. The trucks will offer custom solutions for a large variety of job applications—from moving rock and hauling trash to logging and pouring concrete.

Before Caterpillar engineers started designing, the company asked vocational truck owners and drivers what they wanted and needed from their trucks. “Our design and manufacturing has been focused squarely on making the customer input we gathered a reality,” said George Taylor, Director and General Manager of the Cat Global On-Highway Department.

Taylor added, “We coupled customer input with our knowledge learned from years of experience working closely with different industries to meet their heavy equipment needs to identify the ideal standard options for various industry applications. As a result, we’re proud we will deliver a line of vocational trucks that our customers want, knowing they are built for a wide variety of jobs.”

Caterpillar will offer the heavy-duty Cat Vocational Day Cab Trucks with a full range of popular engine ratings and torque capability options. The specs are designed explicitly for customers’ demanding applications and include a Cat CT11 engine with ratings from 330bhp to 390 bhp, a Cat CT13 with ratings from 410 bhp to 475 bhp and, coming in 2012, a Cat CT15 with ratings from 435 bhp to 550 bhp.

Because of its proven record for quality and reliability that maximizes uptime, the Cat CX31 torque converter style automatic transmission, with three standard locations for Rear Power Take Off drive positions, will be a noteworthy option for Cat Vocational Trucks. Caterpillar also offers a complete line of other OEM vocational transmission options, including Eaton manual and automated manual transmissions.

“These trucks are everything the Cat brand represents in terms of quality, durability, reliability, and driver ergonomics, so we’re looking forward to seeing the reaction to the CT660 at CONEXPO,” said Cat Vocational Truck Product Manager Gary Blood, who is responsible for product strategy, design and introduction of the new trucks.

Product Support and Dealer Readiness

According to Product Support Manager Tom Eberlin, customers can count on exceptional product support, as they do with all Cat equipment. That means support in the field, as well as from the 24/7 Cat On-Highway Call Center and from Cat dealers. Eberlin said, “Over the years, Caterpillar and our dealers have provided unsurpassed product support to our customers who operate our truck engines. We will continue to support the 1.6 million truck engines in operation today and leverage this support with our new vocational trucks.”

Strategy/Dealer Development Manager Ed Cullen has been working closely with Cat dealers as they’ve been gearing up to support the new trucks with bumper-to-bumper service. Cullen has also been communicating truck options and features and benefits to dealerships, so they are well prepared to consult with customers during the sales process.

Cullen said, “We’re sure owners, as well as the drivers, will be thrilled when we share details about the features and benefits of the CT660 at our unveiling, and they’ll be equally thrilled with our full Cat truck line over the coming years, because these are the trucks customers told us they wanted.”

New TRIP Report Identifies Alabama’s Top 40 Chokepoints And Strategies For Improvement

Birmingham Alabama Report:

A new report that identifies the 40 worst chokepoints on Alabama’s roads, bridges and transit systems will be released in Birmingham at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, October 28.

TRIP will release a report titled, “Alabama’s Transportation Chokepoints: The Top 40 Chokepoints and Remedies for Relief.” It pinpoints the 40 segments of Alabama’s road, highway and transit systems that impede routine travel, commuting or commerce, or place limits on economic development because of deficient design or inadequate capacity. These chokepoints are located throughout the state, with many of them in the Birmingham area. TRIP is a national nonprofit transportation research group based in Washington, DC.

TRIP’s Frank Moretti will present the findings of the report. Local officials will also be on hand to comment on the report.

TIME:                 10:00 a.m.

DATE:               Thursday, October 28

PLACE:            2800 Highway 280 South

Birmingham, Alabama(This is the old Mountain Brook Inn location. Enter from the east, just past office park on right.)

WHO:                        Barry Copeland, Interim President, Birmingham Business Alliance

Bill Foisy, Director of Planning, Regional Planning Commission of Greater Birmingham

Clay Ingram, PR and Marketing Manager, AAA Alabama

Frank Moretti, Director of Policy and Research, TRIP

CONTACT:             Frank Moretti                                    202.262.0714 (cell)

Carolyn Bonifas (TRIP)                        703.801.9212 (cell)

Mobile Alabama Report:

A new report that identifies the 40 worst chokepoints on Alabama’s roads, bridges and transit systems will be released in Mobile at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, October 28.

TRIP will release a report titled, “Alabama’s Transportation Chokepoints: The Top 40 Chokepoints and Remedies for Relief.” It pinpoints the 40 segments of Alabama’s road, highway and transit systems that impede routine travel, commuting or commerce, or place limits on economic development because of deficient design or inadequate capacity. These chokepoints are located throughout the state, with many of them – including the worst chokepoint – in the Mobile area. TRIP is a national nonprofit transportation research group based in Washington, DC.

TRIP’s Carolyn Bonifas will present the findings of the report. Local officials will also be on hand to comment on the report.

TIME:              10:00 a.m.

DATE:            Thursday, October 28

PLACE:           301 N. Water Street

Mobile, AL (Parking available at Jordan Pile Driving)

WHO: Mike Dean, Mobile County Commissioner

Carolyn Bonifas, Associate Director of Research and Communication TRIP

CONTACT:   Carolyn Bonifas                                    703.801.9212 (cell)

Frank Moretti (TRIP)                        202.262.0714 (cell)