Monthly Archive for December, 2011

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World of Concrete 2012 Releases New Mobile App

World of Concrete, in partnership with Maryland-based Core-Apps, today released a new mobile app available for iPhone, Android and Blackberry. The new offering gives attendees and exhibitors access to a fully integrated trade show solution that streamlines real-time information including alerts, interactive floor plan and networking tools.

“The World of Concrete Show App is a great tool that will really make your trip to the show even more productive,” said Rick McConnell, president of Hanley Wood Exhibitions for World of Concrete. “The map feature to navigate the show floor, the calendar option, show alerts and detailed seminar information updates are just a couple of the cool features that will enhance your show experience. Be sure and download as soon as you can!”

The World of Concrete App provides easy-to-use interactive capabilities:

  •  Dashboard with real-time info.
  •  Interactive floor map
  •  Alerts from the show organizer
  •  Networking tools to stay connected to colleagues and friends
  •  Twitter and Facebook integration

iPhone (plus, iPod Touch & iPad) and Android users: visit your App Store or Android Market on your phone and search for WOC 2012. Blackberry and all other web browser-enabled phone users: point your mobile browser to http://m.core-apps.com/woc2012 to be directed to download the proper version of the app for your particular device, or on some phones, bookmark this page for future reference.

 About World of Concrete

World of Concrete is the industry’s ONLY annual international event dedicated to the commercial concrete and masonry construction industries. Featuring indoor and outdoor exhibits with the industry’s leading suppliers showcasing innovative products and technologies, exciting demonstrations and competitions, and a world-class education program. Visit www.worldofconcrete.com for complete show details.

 

A Christmas Carol (Not by Charles Dickens) By Greg Sitek

Site-K Editorial Staff

“No way am I going to give you another mechanic. You do the job I hired you to do Ratchet or you can find another,” Eversqueezer Scrooge said to his head mechanic (head mechanic because he’s the only one). “Bah humbug!”

“Ahbhh yes sir. I’ll do my best sir but you know tomorrow’s Christmas . . .”

“I don’t care what tomorrow is. If you don’t get that dozer fixed it’s your last day,” screamed Eversqueezer.

Bob Ratchet left the main offices and headed for the shop.” I wish we could get a couple more mechanics. Mr. Scrooge’s so tight,” mumbled Ratchet. “You’d think after all these years in construction he’d know the value of good maintenance, enough people and not overworking everyone.”

Meanwhile Eversqueezer left the office and went home. “People! Always trying to bleed you,” he grouched. “Always wanting, wanting, wanting. Now Ratchet’s Christmas whine is – I need more people.

Eversqueezer turned into his driveway and punched the button on the door opener. It didn’t respond. Instead, a face appeared, the face of his deceased partner Will Pinchapenny.

“Eversqueezer,” Pinchapenny said, “you need to change your ways or you’ll end up here with me.”

“You’re dead Pinchapenny, you’re dead, “Eversqueezer shouted frantically. “I buried you myself…”

“Yeah, you sure did,” answered Pinchapenny. “In the cheapest box you could find. It didn’t last six months. ”

“Go ‘way, leave me alone,” screamed the terrorized Eversqueezer.

”Not till you’ve changed your attitude you old skinflint,” said his dead partner.

Suddenly a dense fog filled the driveway. A deep voice resounded as a gigantic figure appeared yelling, “Good evening Eversqueezer. I’m the Ghost of Maintenance Present. Come with me and see what you really are. See what others think of you.”

“Go away. Wait! What’s this? I’m back in my shop. There’s Ratchet trying to fix the dozer. He’d better get the job done or else… “Eversqueezer Scrooge said.

“Look how cold he is. No tools to work with. How can he fix the dozer? He has no replacement parts,” the ghost stated.

“That’s his problem not mine,” he pointed out. “What’s that he’s saying?”

“If only Mr. Scrooge would understand,” Ratchet cried. ”If only he’d consider tools and parts and another mechanic. We’d be able to do so much more for him. We’d avert all the breakdowns, unscheduled downtime failures. We’d be able to do a better job for him.”

“Humph! He cares,” observed Eversqueezer. “He really cares.”

As quickly as he appeared at the shop Scrooge found himself back in his driveway. Before his head cleared, another figure appeared.

“Well, Eversqueezer, you’ve seen what’s going on right now. Come with me and let me show you something. You’ll really appreciate this. I’m the Ghost of Maintenance Past.”

In a twinkling, Scrooge found himself on a jobsite. It was the time he lost thousands of dollars because an excavator unexpectedly (but predictably) broke down. It almost put him out of business.

“I remember that incident,” he shouted. “I had to fire that worthless superintendent, Ernest Manager. He was so incompetent. What’s he saying to the guy next to him?” asked Scrooge.

“You’re right Tom, oil analysis would have warned us of this problem. You know how Scrooge is,” Ernest Manager stated. “He won’t spend a penny on maintenance, especially preventive maintenance. Between him and his partner, Pinchapenny, it’s a wonder anything runs. Can you imagine how much money he’d make if he took care of his equipment?”

“You mean to tell me that all that stuff about oil analysis is true? It can help?” questioned Eversqueezer. “You mean to tell me that ol’ Ernest wasn’t lying?”

Before finding out the answer Eversqueezer was again back in his drive. This time he was confronted by an even more intimidating apparition.

“You guessed it Sport. I’m the Ghost of Maintenance Future. You may as well come along and see what’s in store for you.”

They were back at the shop. The windows were boarded, the fence falling over. The yard was filled with machines in various stages of disrepair.

“What’s going on here? I can’t operate with equipment in that condition,” Eversqueezer screamed at the ghost. Where’s Ratchet?”

“He’s gone,” the ghost replied. “You fired him on Christmas Day a few years ago because he couldn’t fix a dozer. Remember? He died shortly after, a broken man. Broken because he had failed you when in reality you failed him as well as yourself,” the ghost said hauntingly.

“That’s what’s left of your fleet after having cannibalized it for spare parts, neglecting it and refusing to give it the maintenance it needs. This is what you have to face Eversqueezer.”

The fog cleared. The ghosts left and the face of Pinchapenny reappeared.

“The future’s not cast in stone Eversqueezer. You can still do something about it if you act now,” Pinchapenny said. “Go back to the shop. Tell Ratchet to go home and be with his family. Tell him to take Christmas off. Give him a raise. He deserves it. After all, he puts up with you, doesn’t he? And tell him that after the holidays you want to start a maintenance program, use oil analysis and hire a couple more mechanics.

“Oh yeah Eversqueezer,” Pinchapenny continued, “don’t forget to tell him Merry Christmas.”

ASCE Study Finds Water Infrastructure Deficiencies Could Harm U.S. Economy

Aging water infrastructure will cost U.S. businesses $147 billion over the next decade, a new ASCE report released this week found.  “Failure to Act:  The Economic Impact of Current Investment Trends in Water and Wastewater Treatment Infrastructure” identifies the long-term consequences to the nation’s economy from failing to invest today in our aging drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. The report is the second in a four part series of economic studies assessing the impacts of continued underinvestment in the nation’s infrastructure systems.

The report answers the question of how the condition of the nation’s deteriorating wastewater and drinking water infrastructure impinges on economic prosperity of American jobs, businesses, and entire sectors of the economy. In other words, how does a D- for water treatment identified ASCE’s 2009 Report Card for America’s Infrastructure affect America’s economic future? The report’s results are sobering.

Water infrastructure in the United States is aging, and investments have not kept pace with the escalating costs. In fact, the report finds that by 2020, the US will have fallen $84 billion short of the investments needed in our critical water systems. Even with the increased use of sustainable practices and cost-effective development of other efficiency methods, the growing gap between capital needs to maintain drinking-water and wastewater treatment infrastructure and investments to meet those needs will likely result in unreliable water service and inadequate wastewater treatment. However, if we close that gap and invest in our water infrastructure, we can prevent the following impacts by 2020:

• $59 billion in increased costs to households

• $147 billion in increased costs to businesses

• $416 billion in lost Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

• Loss of 700,000 jobs

On Tuesday, ASCE President-Elect, Greg DiLoreto P.E., M.ASCE, chief executive officer for the publicly-owned Tualatin Valley Water District in the Portland, Oregon area, introduced some of the report’s results to Congress (see related story below.)

Also this week, ASCE held a series of briefings for water infrastructure stakeholders and Congressional staff.  ASCE will lead webinars in early 2012 for all members interested in more details on the report.

In July, ASCE issued the first Failure to Act report on under-investment in the nation’s surface transportation systems.  We concluded that by 2020 the nation’s deteriorating surface transportation systems could cost the American economy more than 876,000 jobs, and suppress the growth of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by $897 billion.

Download and view the full reports as well as the executive summary on ASCE’s “Failure To Act” website

President Elect Diloreto Testifies On The State Of Deteriorating Water Infrastructure

ASCE President-elect Greg DiLoreto, P.E., P.L.S., F.ASCE, citing a new ASCE analysis of the economic effects of aging infrastructure released this week, said the gap between capital needs and actual expenditures will total $84 billion by 2020.

“Even with the increased use of sustainable practices and cost-effective development of other efficiency methods, the growing gap between capital needs to maintain drinking-water and wastewater treatment infrastructure and investments to meet those needs will likely result in unreliable water service and inadequate wastewater treatment,” DiLoreto said in testimony before the Water and Wildlife subcommittee on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.

“Cumulatively, families will earn $541 billion less in 2020 than they earned in 2011.  By 2020, this means that an individual household will be earning $806 less a year.”

The $84 billion funding gap will result in $147 billion in increased costs for businesses and a further $59 billion for U.S. households, he added.  “In the worst case, the U.S. will lose almost 700,000 jobs by 2020,” DiLoreto said.

As the U.S. population has increased, the percentage served by public water systems has also increased, he testified.

“Each year new water lines are constructed to connect more distant dwellers to centralized systems, continuing to add users to aging systems. Although new pipes are being added to expand service areas, drinking-water systems degrade over time; they must be replaced at the end of their useful life, which ranges from 15 to 95 years,” DiLoreto concluded. 

View the complete hearing record and ASCE’s testimony.
 View ASCE’s policies on infrastructure financing.

ABC Reports: Construction Materials Prices Slip 0.1 Percent in November

“The decline in construction materials prices is most welcome and may induce a larger number of projects to move forward than expected.” —ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.

In a reflection of slow construction activity, construction materials prices slipped 0.1 percent in November, according to the December 15 Producer Price Index (PPI) report by the U.S. Labor Department. However, construction materials prices are still 6.2 percent higher compared to the same time last year.

Nonresidential construction materials prices were unchanged for the month and are 7 percent higher than November 2010.

Iron and steel prices decreased 2.4 percent in November, but are still 11.8 percent higher than the same time last year. Steel mill product prices fell 1.2 percent for the month, but are up 13 percent year over year. Likewise, softwood lumber prices are down 1.2 percent compared to October, but are 1.7 percent higher than November 2011. Prices for prepared asphalt, tar roofing, and siding dropped 5.4 percent for the month, but is still up 1.7 percent from November 2010. Prices for plumbing fixtures and fittings were unchanged in November, but are 2.8 percent higher than one year ago.

In contrast, prices for nonferrous wire and cable increased 3.7 percent in November and are up 1.2 percent year over year. Prices for concrete products inched up 0.6 percent for the month and increased 0.9 percent during the last twelve months. Prices for fabricated structural metal products edged up 0.4 percent for the month and are 5.7 percent higher than one year ago.

Crude energy prices jumped 10.5 percent in November as crude petroleum prices surged 22.7 percent. Crude energy prices are 19.3 percent higher than in November 2010. Overall, the nation’s wholesale prices increased 0.3 percent for the month and are 5.9 percent higher than one year ago.

Analysis

“Today’s report on construction material prices is a reflection of U.S. and global construction activity,” said Associated Builders and Contractors Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “A number of factors have transpired to end the cycle of rising construction materials prices, including the rise of the U.S. dollar.

“The dollar has gained strength against a number of currencies during a period of global economic unrest and uncertainty,” Basu said. “Given the tumult in Europe, the dollar is likely to remain unusually stable in the weeks ahead.

“The other major factor is the slowing of key emerging economies, including China, India and Brazil,” said Basu. “The Brazilian economy was flat during the third quarter and the Chinese economy is facing its first real slowdown in years.

“There has continued to be downward pressure on commodity prices,” Basu said. “This is likely to translate into additional declines in construction materials prices as we approach 2012 and beyond. However, the decline in construction materials prices is most welcome and may induce a larger number of projects to move forward than expected.”

New TRIP Report Identifies Maine’s 50 Most Needed Transportation Projects For Economic Growth; Projects Would Improve, Modernize And Expand Road And Transit Systems To Support And Grow The State’s Economy

In order to adequately support Maine’s existing industries and provide for additional economic growth, the state will need to make numerous improvements to its surface transportation system. This is according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research organization.

TRIP’s report, “The Top 50 Surface Transportation Projects to Support Economic Growth and Quality of Life in Maine,” identifies and ranks the projects needed to provide Maine with a transportation system that can support the increased movement of people, goods and resources throughout the state.  The most needed surface transportation improvements in Maine include 35 projects to build, expand or modernize highways or bridges, five projects to improve rail or public transportation, five maritime or port projects, three multi-modal projects, one aviation project and one project to improve the state’s trail system. These improvements would enhance economic development opportunities throughout the state by increasing mobility and freight movement, easing congestion, and making Maine an attractive place to live, visit and do business.

According to the TRIP report, the most needed projects for the state’s economic growth are as follows:

A full list of needed projects, descriptions and their impact on economic development can be found in the appendix of the report.

“Among the most significant challenges going forward will be to change a culture of complacency as it relates to lives lost on our roadways. AAA envisions a transportation system with a comprehensive approach to safety which includes solutions that lead to safer drivers driving safer vehicles on safer roads,” said Pat Moody, public affairs manager at AAA Northern New England.

Enhancing critical segments of Maine’s surface transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth, improving the quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors.

Sustaining Maine’s long-term economic growth and maintaining the state’s high quality of life will require increased investment in expanding the capacity of the state’s surface transportation system, which will enhance business productivity and support short- and long-term job creation in the state.

“Maine can’t get where it wants to go – in both a literal and an economic sense – without an efficient transportation system,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP. “It is critical that Maine’s transportation system is adequately funded at the local, state and federal level. Congress can take an important first step by passing adequately funded federal surface transportation legislation, which has been delayed far too long.  Thousands of jobs and the state’s economic well-being are riding on it.”

TRIP ranked each transportation project based on a rating system that considered the following: short-term economic benefits, including job creation; the level of improvement in the condition of the transportation facility, including safety improvements; the degree of improvement in access and mobility; and the long-term improvement provided in regional or state economic performance and competitiveness.

Executive Summary

Maine’s transportation system has played a significant role in the state’s development, providing mobility and access for residents, visitors, businesses and industry.  The state’s roads, highways, rails, ports and public transit systems remain the backbone of the Pine Tree State’s economy. Maine’s transportation system also provides for a high quality of life and makes the state a desirable place to live and visit. The condition and quality of its transportation system will play a critical role in Maine’s ability to continue to recover from the recession, capitalize on its economic advantages and meet the demands of the 21st Century.

To achieve sustainable economic growth, Maine must proceed with numerous projects to improve key roads, bridges, ports and public transit systems. Enhancing critical segments of Maine’s transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long-term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness and improve the quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth.

In this report, TRIP examines recent transportation and economic trends in Maine and provides information on the transportation projects in the state that are most needed to support economic growth. Sources of data include the Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and the U.S. Census Bureau.  All data used in the report is the latest available.

TRIP has identified and ranked the 50 transportation projects that are most needed to support Maine’s economic growth. These projects are located throughout the state.

  • The most needed transportation improvements in Maine include 35 projects to build, expand or modernize highways or bridges, five projects to improve rail or public transportation, five maritime or port projects, three  multi-modal projects, one aviation project and one project to improve the state’s trail system.  These improvements would enhance economic development opportunities throughout the state by increasing mobility and freight movement, easing congestion, and making Maine an attractive place to live, visit and do business.
  • TRIP ranked each transportation project based on a rating system that considered the following: short-term economic benefits, including job creation; the level of improvement in the condition of the transportation facility, including safety improvements; the degree of improvement in access and mobility; and the long-term improvement provided in regional or state economic performance and competitiveness.
  • Maine’s 10 most needed transportation projects to support economic development in the state as determined by TRIP follow.  Additional details on these and the other projects that make up the 50 most needed projects in Maine for economic recovery and growth are included in the report’s Appendix.

1.      New Controlled Access Highway between I-395 and Route 9 in Penobscot County This $70-100 million project will facilitate East-West traffic and alleviate congestion, serving as the primary route for moving people and goods throughout the entire state. It will also reduce travel time and fuel costs for Maine shippers, citizens and visitors.

2.     Rehabilitating the Sarah Mildred Long Bridge in York County This $105-115 million project would rehabilitate one of three critical bridges connecting Maine and New Hampshire at Kittery-Portsmouth. The Sarah Mildred Long Bridge also provides the only rail crossing in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Naval Ship Yard in Kittery. Without these improvements, the bridge will only be open to bicycle and pedestrian traffic. The bridge improvements will maintain businesses on both sides of the river that rely on passerby traffic, in addition to strengthening efforts by both communities to improve their downtown areas and attract more visitors.

3.     Construction of New East-West Route. Stretching from near Calais to near Cobum, this new route would expand Maine’s economic activity and accelerate recession recovery. It would link Halifax, Nova Scotia to mid-US markets via Maine. This major construction project, unrivaled since Interstate construction in Maine, would provide long-term opportunities for expanded markets and more efficient delivery of goods. The state legislature will consider a bill to fund an initial study for the road in the 2012 session.  Cost of the study is $300,000, while construction would likely top $1 billion.

4.     Reconstruction and Rehabilitation of Route 3 in Hancock County Stretching from near Sand Point Road to Route 233, this $5-10 million project would improve 4.3 miles of roadway, which is currently inadequate given the vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian traffic it carries. Route 3 serves as the gateway to Acadia National Park and is one of the most important highways in Maine. The project would improve safety, potentially leverage private investments and enhance the visitor experience in Acadia.

5.     Development of a Cargo Port at Sears Island This $225-250 million project would improve international freight connections to the North American freight infrastructure, making it critical for freight movement, both locally and internationally. It would reduce the costs of local freight movement by piggybacking onto international freight movements and would also add construction jobs. A portion of the island, which is owned by the State of Maine, has been set aside to develop the port.

6.     Replacement of the Martins Point Bridge in Portland This $30-35 million project would replace the Martins Point Bridge between Portland and Falmouth. This bridge carries coastal US Route 1, which carries significant local and tourist traffic. Completion of this project would add construction jobs, facilitate regional tourism and alleviate congestion on the Portland peninsula.

7.     Rehabilitating the West Approach Bridge in Bath This $15 million project will rehabilitate the bridge, which is reaching the end of its useful life. Route 1 in the mid-coast is one of Maine’s most important highways for both commerce and tourism. It is also adjacent to Bath Iron Works, one of Maine’s largest employers

8.     East-West Facility in Gorham A planning study is currently underway to design a project to relieve congestion and improve safety west of I-95 in Cumberland County (the fastest growing area of Maine). The project would create jobs during the construction phase and allow for improved access to I-95, which will position the area for increased economic development and efficiencies in transporting goods and people.

9.     Replacing the Kennebec River Bridge between Richmond and Dresden This $20-30 million project would replace the bridge, which is rapidly approaching the end of its useful life and can no longer be rehabilitated. This bridge provides a significant regional crossing of the Kennebec River. Closing or posting the bridge would result in traveler delays in excess of 45 minutes each way. Completion of the project would create or sustain construction jobs while improving safety and connectivity

10.   Intermodal Facility and Acadia National Park Welcome Center in Trenton This $12 million project at the Gateway Center was designed to improve safety and to reduce traffic congestion and the demand for parking at Acadia National Park. The facility will be constructed on Route 3, the only highway leading to Acadia National Park, and will encourage the use of an alternative mode both at the site, and for future travel, to and from the park. Following completion, the Town of Trenton will become a destination as a site to learn more about Acadia National Park and the region. The bus system will also create improved transportation options for Trenton residents.

Transportation projects that improve the efficiency, condition or safety of a highway or transit route provide significant economic benefits by reducing transportation delays and costs associated with a deficient transportation system.  Some benefits of transportation improvements include the following. 

  • Improved business competitiveness due to reduced production and distribution costs as a result of increased travel speeds and fewer mobility barriers.
  • Improvements in household welfare resulting from better access to higher-paying jobs, a wider selection of competitively priced consumer goods, additional housing and healthcare options, and improved mobility for residents without access to private vehicles.
  • Gains in local, regional and state economies due to improved regional economic competitiveness, which stimulates population and job growth.
  • Increased leisure/tourism and business travel resulting from the enhanced condition and reliability of a region’s transportation system.
  • A reduction in economic losses from vehicle crashes, traffic congestion and vehicle maintenance costs associated with driving on deficient roads.
  • The creation of both short-term and long-term jobs.
  • Transportation projects that expand roadway or transit capacity produce significant economic benefits by reducing congestion and improving access, thus speeding the flow of people and goods while reducing fuel consumption.
  • Transportation projects that maintain and preserve existing transportation infrastructure also provide significant economic benefits by improving travel speeds, capacity, load-carry abilities and safety, and reducing operating costs for people and businesses.  Such projects also extend the service life of a road, bridge or transit vehicle or facility, which saves money by either postponing or eliminating the need for more expensive future repairs.
  • Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes.
  • A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow. 

While Maine’s diverse economy has been impacted by the recession, the state’s transportation system will need to accommodate projected future growth.

  • From 1990 to 2010, Maine’s population increased by seven percent, from approximately 1.2 million to approximately 1.3 million. Maine’s population is expected to increase to 1.4 million by 2030.
  • From 1990 to 2009, annual vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) in the state increased by 22 percent, from approximately 11.9 billion VMT to 14.5 billion VMT. Based on travel and population trends, TRIP estimates that vehicle travel in Maine will increase another 25 percent by 2030, reaching approximately 18.1 billion VMT.
  • Maine’s unemployment rate rose from 4.9 percent in October 2007 to 7.3 percent in October 2011. The national unemployment rate was 9.0 percent in October 2011.
  • In 2011, Maine is projected to experience a 1.8 percent increase in real gross state product (GSP), which is factored for price changes, less than the forecast national average of 2.1 percent.
  • In 2012, Maine is projected to have a 3.3 percent rate of economic growth, measured in real GSP, which is factored for price changes.  This rate of growth is lower than the forecast 3.4 percent increase in national real GSP in 2012.
  • Maine has benefited from a diverse economy, which includes significant employment in the following sectors: agriculture, forest products, manufacturing, commercial fishing, bio-technology, naval ship building and construction, tourism and outdoor recreation.

Maine’s economy is served by an extensive surface transportation system that has some deficiencies and experiences severe congestion in key areas.  Roads carry the majority of freight shipped in the state.

  • Maine’s system of 22,839 miles of roads and 2,393 bridges, maintained by local, state and federal governments, carry 14.5 billion vehicle miles of travel annually.
  • Twenty-seven percent of Maine’s major roads are deficient, with 10 percent rated in poor condition and an additional 17 percent rated mediocre in 2008.  An additional 17 percent of the state’s major roads were rated in fair condition and 55 percent were rated in good condition.
  • Fifteen percent of Maine’s bridges were rated structurally deficient in 2010.  A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.  Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks, school buses and emergency services vehicles.
  • Every year, approximately $30.9 billion in goods are shipped annually from sites in Maine and another $41.1 billion in goods are shipped annually to sites in Maine, mostly by truck.
  • In 2010, 17 percent of Maine’s bridges were rated as functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • Eighty-one percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Maine are carried by trucks and another 10 percent are carried by parcel, U.S. Postal Service or courier services, which use trucks for part of the deliveries.

Sources of data for this report include the Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau.  All data used in the report is the latest available.