TRIP Reports: California Motorists Lose $61 Billion Annually On Roads That Are Rough, Congested & Lack Some Safety Features – As Much As $2,995 Per Driver

California Motorists Lose $61 Billion Annually On Roads That Are Rough, Congested & Lack Some Safety Features – As Much As $2,995 Per Driver. A Lack Of Adequate Funding Would Lead To Further Deterioration, Increased Congestion And Higher Costs To Motorists

Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost California motorists a total of $61 billion annually – a much as $2,995 per driver in some urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Adequate investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels is needed to relieve traffic congestion, improve the road, bridge, transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in California, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research organization.

The TRIP report, California Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,”finds that throughout California, more than two-thirds of major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor or mediocre condition and 1,603 of 25,657 locally and state-maintained bridges (20 feet or longer) are structurally deficient. The report also finds that California’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, causing significant delays and choking commuting and commerce.

The chart below details costs per driver in the state’s largest urban areas and statewide in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor.

The TRIP report finds that 68 percent of California’s major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor or mediocre condition. Forty-four percent of California’s major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor condition and 24 percent are in mediocre condition. Thirteen percent of California’s major roads are in fair condition and the remaining 19 percent are in good condition. Driving on deteriorated roads costs California motorists a total of $22.1 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs an average of $843 per driver. These costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

Traffic congestion in California is worsening, costing the state’s drivers a total of $29.1 billion each year in lost time and wasted fuel. Eighty-five percent of California’s urban Interstates are congested, robbing commuters of time and money and imposing increased costs on businesses, shippers, and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

More than half – 56 percent – of California’s bridges are at least 50 years old – the eighth highest rate in the nation. Statewide, 1,603 of 25,657 bridges (20 feet or longer) are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Bridges that are structurally deficient may be posted for lower weight limits or closed if their condition warrants such action.

Traffic crashes in California claimed the lives of 15,730 people over the last five years. California’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.07 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is lower than the national average of 1.18.  The fatality rate on California’s non-interstate rural roads is approximately four and a half times higher than on all other roads in the state (3.48 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.76). Traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $9.8 billion in economic costs on California drivers in 2016.

The efficiency and condition of California’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy.  Annually, $2.8 trillion in goods are shipped to and from sites in California, mostly by trucks, relying heavily on the state’s network of roads and bridges. Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to relocate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system. Approximately 7.1 million full-time jobs in California in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture, and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation network.

Investment in California’s roads, highways, and bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. In April 2017, the California legislature enacted SB 1 — the Road Repair and Accountability Act. SB 1 increased state revenues for transportation by increasing the state’s gasoline and diesel taxes, implementing a transportation investment fee on vehicles and initiating an annual fee on zero emission vehicles. It is estimated that SB 1 will increase state revenues for California’s transportation system by an average of $5.2 billion annually over the next decade.

“Driving on deficient California roads comes with a $61 billion yearly price tag for the state’s motorists,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Adequate funding for the state’s transportation system would allow for smoother roads, more efficient mobility, enhanced safety, and economic growth opportunities while saving California’s drivers time and money.”

 

 

 

California Transportation

by the Numbers

MEETING THE STATE’S NEED FOR

SAFE, SMOOTH AND EFFICIENT MOBILITY

CALIFORNIA KEY TRANSPORTATION FACTS

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

Driving on California roads that are deteriorated, congested, and that lack some desirable safety features costs California drivers a total of $61 billion each year. TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on rough roads, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.

An urban area is defined as a region’s municipalities and surrounding suburbs for pavement condition and congestion data; bridge and traffic fatality data include a region’s major counties.

CALIFORNIA ROADS PROVIDE A ROUGH RIDE

Due to inadequate state and local funding, 68 percent of major roads and highways in California are in poor or mediocre condition costing the average state driver an extra $843 annually in additional vehicle operating costs as a result of driving on rough roads – a total of $22.1 billion statewide.

 

CALIFORNIA BRIDGE CONDITIONS

More than 1,500 of California’s bridges (20 feet or longer) are structurally deficient, meaning there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.   More than half – 56 percent – of California’s bridges are at least 50 years old – the eighth highest rate in the nation.

CALIFORNIA ROADS ARE INCREASINGLY CONGESTED

Congested roads choke commuting and commerce and cost California drivers $29.1 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. In the most congested areas, drivers lose up to $1,774 and spend nearly three and a half full days each year in congestion.

CALIFORNIA TRAFFIC SAFETY AND FATALITIES

Over the last five years, 15,730 people were killed in traffic crashes in California. Traffic crashes in California in 2016 imposed a total of $29.4 billion in economic costs.  Traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $9.8 billion in economic costs in 2016.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of California’s economy rides on its transportation system. Each year, $2.8 trillion in goods are shipped to and from sites in California, mostly by truck. Increases in passenger and freight movement will place further burdens on the state’s already deteriorated and congested network of roads and bridges.

The design, construction, and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in California supports 419,790 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $17.8 billion annually. Approximately 7.1 million full-time jobs in California in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture, and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation network.

 

SB 1 INCREASES CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT

In April 2017, the California legislature enacted SB 1 — the Road Repair and Accountability Act. SB 1 increased state revenues for transportation by increasing the state’s gasoline and diesel taxes, implementing a transportation investment fee on vehicles and initiating an annual fee on zero emission vehicles. It is estimated that SB 1 will increase state revenues for California’s transportation system by an average of $5.2 billion annually over the next decade.  On November 6, 2018, Californians will vote on Proposition 6, which, if approved, would repeal SB 1. The elimination of SB 1 revenues would reduce funds available in California for transportation projects to improve road, highway and bridge conditions, improve traffic safety, enhance pedestrian and bicycle facilities, improve public transit and relieve traffic congestion.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of California’s economy rides on its transportation system. Each year, $2.8 trillion in goods are shipped to and from sites in California, mostly by truck. Increases in passenger and freight movement will place further burdens on the state’s already deteriorated and congested network of roads and bridges.

The design, construction, and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in California supports 419,790 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $17.8 billion annually. Approximately 7.1 million full-time jobs in California in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation network.

SB 1 INCREASES CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT

In April 2017, the California legislature enacted SB 1 — the Road Repair and Accountability Act. SB 1 increased state revenues for transportation by increasing the state’s gasoline and diesel taxes, implementing a transportation investment fee on vehicles and initiating an annual fee on zero emission vehicles. It is estimated that SB 1 will increase state revenues for California’s transportation system by an average of $5.2 billion annually over the next decade.  On November 6, 2018, Californians will vote on Proposition 6, which, if approved, would repeal SB 1. The elimination of SB 1 revenues would reduce funds available in California for transportation projects to improve road, highway and bridge conditions, improve traffic safety, enhance pedestrian and bicycle facilities, improve public transit and relieve traffic congestion.

Click here to view the full report:California Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility

 

ARTBA Reports: Gas Tax Supporters in 12 States Cruise Through Primaries

Ninety-six percent of state lawmakers who voted in favor of a gas tax increase and faced reelection in 2018 primaries will advance to the Nov. 6 general election, according to new data from the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s Transportation Investment Advocacy Center™ (ARTBA-TIAC).

The 2018 primaries saw 802 legislators who voted on gas tax increase legislation from 12 states – California, Iowa, Indiana, Montana, Nebraska, Oregon, South Carolina, Utah, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Michigan and Washington – run for reelection. Of those lawmakers, 558 voted in favor of a gas tax increase and ran for reelection, with 538—or 96 percent—advancing to November’s general election.

The numbers include 97 percent of the 263 Democratic lawmakers, and 96 percent of 295 Republican lawmakers.

Of the 222 legislators who voted against a gas tax increase and ran for reelection, 216—or 97 percent—will move on to November’s general election. This includes 96 percent of 52 Democratic lawmakers, and 97 percent of 170 Republican lawmakers.

An additional 22 lawmakers did not cast a vote on a gas tax increase measure and ran for reelection.

The results support earlier findings from ARTBA-TIAC that showed voting for a gas tax increase does not affect a lawmaker’s chance of reelection. In the 16 states that increased their gas tax rates or equivalent measures between 2013 and 2016, nearly all (92 percent) of the 1,354 state legislators who voted for a gas tax increase and stood for reelection between 2013 and 2017 were sent back to the state house by voters. Of the 712 elected officials who voted against a gas tax increase, 93 percent were also given another term.

More information on the results, and studies on state and local transportation investment and legislative and ballot initiatives can be found at www.transportationinvestment.org. The Center says it plans to do a similar report to compare the results following the November general election.

TIAC operations are supported by ARTBA’s “Transportation Makes America Work” program.

Established in 1902 and based in Washington, D.C., ARTBA is the “consensus voice” of the U.S. transportation design and construction industry before Congress, federal agencies, the White House, news media and the general public.

http://transportationinvestment.org/

DEWALT Announces Metal Tool Storage Line Expansion

DEWALT Announces Metal Tool Storage Line Expansion

New Metal Storage units are made in the USA with global materials

DEWALT announces the expansion of its Metal Tool Storage line, including top chests, workbenches, and rolling cabinets ranging from 26-to 52-inches wide as well as 18-inches to 21-inches deep for ample storage solutions. Each is made in the USA with global materials.

The 21-inch depth metal storage options include the 41-inch Wide Tool Chest (DWST24071) and Rolling Cabinet (DWST24071) combination, the 41-inch Wide Mobile Workbench with Wood Top (DWST24192), and 52-inch Tool Chest (DWST25182) and Rolling Tool Cabinet (DWST24191)combination. They are each constructed of double-wall steel for strength and durability. The drawers in the rolling cabinets provide a 200-pound load capacity with one 300-pound, full-width load capacity drawer. Each drawer of all 21-inch deep units features full-extension ball-bearing drawer slides that are equipped with the POSI-LATCH® drawer latching system for easy release. The 21-inch units each include an integrated power and USB port in the top chests and mobile workbench as well as a keyed internal locking system and embossed drawer liners and top mats in each unit. Each top chest and rolling cabinet combination offers an overall load rating of 2,500 pounds with reinforced mounting channels and four 6-inch by 2-inch casters, for easy mobility around the shop floor. These storage units are perfect for mechanic’s tool sets, hand tools, and accessories storage needs and more.

The 18-inch depth series of metal storage options include three top chest and rolling cabinet combinations, ranging in size from 26” inches wide to 52” wide. They are constructed of double-wall steel for strength and durability. Each drawer comes equipped with 100-pound load capacity drawers featuring full-extension, ball-bearing drawer slides with soft close latching for smooth and quiet operation. Each top chest and rolling cabinet features a keyed internal locking system to safeguard tools and each chest has built-in power and USB strips to conveniently charge power tools, batteries, and electronics. Each top chest and rolling cabinet combo has a 1,500-pound load capacity with four, 5-inch x 2-inch casters. Embossed drawer liners and an embossed top mat come standard and help protect drawer and unit surfaces.

Available now where DEWALT products are sold, users can choose from a variety of sizes and depths in top tool chests, rolling tool cabinets, and mobile workbenches. Each 21-inch and 18-inch deep storage unit is sold separately.

About DEWALT

DEWALT is obsessed with how users work in the real world and is relentlessly pursuing total jobsite solutions. By incorporating its latest technology and industry innovations, DEWALT is leading the charge for the jobsite of the future. DEWALT products are GUARANTEED TOUGH®. For more information, visit www.dewalt.com

ARA Rental Revenue Forecast Gains Strength

The American Rental Association (ARA), for the second quarter in a row, is projecting larger increases in revenue almost across the board for the equipment and event rental industry than it did in the previous five-year forecast released in May.

The July 2018 forecast from ARA Rentalytics calls for total U.S. rental revenue of $53.04 billion in 2018, up 7.6 percent, and then growing 5.8 percent in 2019, 5.9 percent in 2020, 5.1 percent in 2021 and 4.7 percent in 2022 to reach $65.4 billion.

The May forecast called for total U.S. rental revenue of $52.3 billion in 2018 growing to $64.1 billion in 2022.

“ARA’s second-quarter forecast shows continued strong growth in rental revenues over the forecast period. Growth rates for 2018 and 2019 look particularly strong in all segments of the equipment and event rental industry with growth rates forecast at more than double the rate of GDP [gross domestic product] growth,” says John McClelland, Ph.D., ARA’s vice president, government affairs, and chief economist.

While the near-term outlook is particularly strong, McClelland said the out-years of the forecast could be subject to change due to the potential impact of tariffs on the economy and construction projects.

“Coupled with the increases in equipment prices that are almost inevitable after the imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminum, the equipment and event rental industry could face a challenging economic climate beginning in 2020 and beyond,” McClelland says.

According to ARA Rentalytics, construction and industrial equipment rentals continues to account for the bulk of revenue in equipment and event rental and now is expected to reach $37.15 billion in 2018, up 8.3 percent over last year. General tool rental revenue in 2018 is forecast to be $12.49 billion, up 5.4 percent. Party and event revenue is expected to reach $3.4 billion in 2018, up 8.8 percent.

ARA also forecasts total investment in equipment by rental companies to reach $13.9 billion in 2018, up 7.8 percent over 2017.

In Canada, the forecast is for $5.4 billion in revenue in 2018, up 4.4 percent, with 4.8 percent growth in 2019, 4.7 percent in 2020, 3.8 percent in 2021 and 2.7 percent in 2022 to reach $6.159 billion.

About ARA: (www.ARArental.org) The American Rental Association, Moline, Ill., is an international trade association for owners of equipment rental businesses and the manufacturers and suppliers of construction/industrial, general tool and party/event rental equipment. ARA members, which include more than 10,000 rental businesses and more than 1,000 manufacturers and suppliers, are located in every U.S. state, every Canadian province and more than 30 countries worldwide. Founded in 1955, ARA is the source for information, advocacy, education, networking and marketplace opportunities for the equipment and event rental industry throughout the world.

DEWALT Announces 20V MAX Cordless Framing Hammer

The new 21° Plastic Collated Cordless Framing Nailer (DCN21PL) from DEWALT features a dual speed motor optimized to drive a wide range of plastic collated fasteners.

At only 8.5 lbs. (bare tool), the lightweight 21° Plastic Collated Cordless Framing Nailer takes 2” – 3-1/4” full round head fasteners with a 0.113” – 0.148” diameter. Part of the growing 20V MAX* System that now features over 180 products, this nailer eliminates the need for extra equipment such as compressors and air hoses. Other features of the nailer include a stall release lever to reset the driver blade in the event of a jam, an easy-to-access nose piece for quick remove of jammed nails, an adjustable rafter hook, and a dry-fire lockout that prevents the tool from firing when nails are low.

The 21° Plastic Collated Framing Nailer achieves up to 899 nails per charge** and features mechanical switches to make adjusting the tool quick and easy, without complicated interfaces and electronic control panels. The nailer makes tool adjustments simple with its tool-free depth adjustment for precise nail placement and a tool-free selector switch for bump and sequential modes. It offers a high strength aluminum magazine with an easy-to-operate pusher latch that holds up to 49 plastic collated nails.

This nailer offers cordless convenience for a variety of applications including framing out a wall, fastening walls together, setting trusses, installing a subfloor, sheathing, and fence building for general contractors, residential remodelers, residential framers, punch-out crews, fence builders, and deck builders. Coming in fall 2018, the 21° Plastic Collated Cordless Framing Nailer Kit (DCN21PLM1) will come kitted with one 4.0Ah DEWALT battery, one charger, and a bag and will be available where DEWALT products are sold. It will come standard with a three-year limited warranty, one-year free service contract and 90-day money-back guarantee.

With respect to 20V MAX* – Maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.

** In speed 1, using DEWALT 4.0Ah DCB204 battery when fastening 2” nails into SPF.

About DEWALT

DEWALT is obsessed with how users work in the real world and is relentlessly pursuing total job site solutions. By incorporating its latest technology and industry innovations, DEWALT is leading the charge for the job site of the future. DEWALT products. GUARANTEED TOUGH®. For more information, visit www.dewalt.com or follow DEWALT on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn.