Tag Archive for 'AASHTO'

ARTBA Washington Update: Congress Avoids Shutdown & Repeals $7.6 Billion Contract Authority Rescission

Dean Franks, senior vice president of congressional relations, ARTBA

This week Congress passed, and President Donald Trump signed, a Continuing Resolution (CR) that keeps all discretionary government programs funded through Dec. 20. The legislation includes a full repeal of the $7.6 billion Contract Authority rescission that was set to take effect July 1.

The repeal of this rescission, authorized as part of the FAST Act surface transportation law, has been a priority for ARTBA and state DOTs for years. The rescission was a budgetary gimmick included by some members of the House Republican leadership as an attempt to make the FAST Act’s investment increases appear temporary by resetting and lowering the baseline for the surface transportation programs going into the next authorization law as the FAST Act winds down.

ARTBA, AASHTO, and other industry allies have worked to repeal the rescission because it could impede the states’ flexibility in utilizing federal-aid highway funds, especially going into the 2020 construction season. The ARTBA co-chaired Transportation Construction Coalition (TCC) sent a Nov. 15 letter to congressional leaders advocating for repeal of the rescission. A similar Nov. 14 letter signed by 42 national groups, including ARTBA, also called for the repeal.

Thanks are in order to the numerous members of Congress who advocated for the repeal, including Senate Environment & Public Works Committee Chairman John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) and Ranking Member Tom Carper (D-Del.), who introduced legislation (S. 1992) to repeal the rescission which, as of Nov. 22, had 60 co-sponsors. A Nov. 14 letter lead by Rep. Chris Pappas (D-N.H.) and Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska) signed by over 100 of their colleagues also called for rescission repeal.

Regarding FY 2020 spending, the CR funds all relevant transportation programs at FY 2019 authorized levels. The House vote was 231-192 and the Senate approved 74-20. The president signed the measure only hours before the Nov. 21 expiration of an earlier CR.

A full-year transportation appropriations bill is still pending. The House and Senate have passed their versions of FY 2020 transportation bills.

ARTBA understands congressional negotiators are close to reaching agreement on spending levels for each of the 12 appropriations subcommittees, which will allow for the bills to move forward. ARTBA will continue working with members and staff on Capitol Hill, and partner organizations, to ensure a final, FY 2020 bill is enacted before Dec. 20.

Building Highways in the Sky

TRIP: New Report Identifies U.S. Urban Areas With Roughest Roads And Highest Costs To Drivers – As Much As $1,044 Annually. As Travel Growth Returns To Pre-Recession Rates, Road Conditions Expected To Decline Further Without Additional Funding At Local, State & Federal Levels.

TRIPDriving on deteriorated urban roads costs motorists as much as $1,044 annually, according to a new report that evaluates pavement conditions in the nation’s large (500,000+ population) and mid-sized urban areas (250,000-500,000 population) and calculates the additional costs passed on to motorists as a result of driving on rough roads. Driving on roads in disrepair increases consumer costs by accelerating vehicle deterioration and depreciation, and increasing needed maintenance, fuel consumption and tire wear.

 

Driving on deteriorated urban roads costs motorists as much as $1,044 annually, according to a new report that evaluates pavement conditions in the nation’s large (500,000+ population) and mid-sized urban areas (250,000-500,000 population) and calculates the additional costs passed on to motorists as a result of driving on rough roads. Driving on roads in disrepair increases consumer costs by accelerating vehicle deterioration and depreciation, and increasing needed maintenance, fuel consumption and tire wear.

These findings were released today by TRIP, a national transportation research group based in Washington, D.C. The report, Bumpy Roads Ahead: America’s Roughest Rides and Strategies to Make our Roads Smoother,” examines urban pavement conditions, transportation funding, travel trends and economic development. Pavement condition and vehicle operating costs for urban areas with populations of 250,000 or greater can be found in the report and appendices. The charts below detail large and mid-sized urban areas with the highest vehicle operating costs (VOC) and highest share of pavements in poor conditions.

Rank  

Large Urban Area (500,000+ population)

Percent Poor Rank Large Urban Area (500,000+ population) VOC Per Driver
1 San Francisco–Oakland, CA 74% 1 San Francisco-Oakland, CA $ 1,044
2 Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana, CA 73% 2 Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana, CA $ 1,031
3 Concord, CA 62%   3 Concord, CA $     954
4 Detroit, MI 56% 4 Tulsa, OK $     928
5 San Jose, CA 53% 5 Oklahoma City, OK $     917
6 Cleveland, OH 52% 6 Detroit, MI $     866
7 New York–Newark, NY 51% 7 Cleveland, OH $     845
8 San Diego, CA 51% 8 San Jose, CA $     844
9 Grand Rapids, MI 51% 9 San Diego, CA $     843
10 Honolulu, HI 51% 10 San Antonio, TX $     838
11 Akron, OH 50% 11 El Paso, TX $     815
12 San Antonio, TX 49% 12 Riverside–San Bernardino, CA $     812
13 Milwaukee, WI 46% 13 Grand Rapids, MI $     803
14 Riverside–San Bernardino, CA 46% 14 Akron, OH $     797
15 El Paso, TX 46% 15 New York–Newark, NY $     791
16 Oklahoma City, OK 45% 16 Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington, TX $     791
17 Tulsa, OK 45% 17 Birmingham, AL $     784
18 New Haven, CT 45% 18 Honolulu, HI $     777
19 Bridgeport-Stamford, CT 44% 19 Houston, TX $     772
20 Birmingham, AL 43% 20 Sacramento, CA $     767
21 Denver–Aurora, CO 43% 21 Milwaukee, WI $     753
22 Seattle, WA 42% 22 Denver–Aurora, CO $     737
23 Omaha, NE 42% 23 Omaha, NE $     729
24 Sacramento, CA 42% 24 Colorado Springs, CO $     723
25 New Orleans, LA 42% 25 New Orleans, LA $     713

 

Rank Mid-sized Urban Area

(250,000-500,000 population)

Percent Poor Rank Mid-sized Urban Area

(250,000-500,000 population)

VOC Per Driver
1 Flint, MI 54% 1 Temecula–Murrieta, CA $ 857
2 Antioch, CA 52% 2 Flint, MI $ 839
3 Santa Rosa, CA 49% 3 Antioch, CA $ 831
4 Trenton, NJ 48% 4 Jackson, MS $ 818
5 Temecula–Murrieta, CA 47% 5 Santa Rosa, CA $ 811
6 Scranton, PA 46% 6 Trenton, NJ $ 764
7 Reno, NV 46% 7 Hemet, CA $ 758
8 Spokane, WA 44% 8 Reno, NV $ 748
9 Jackson, MS 44% 9 Lansing, MI $ 733
10 Lansing, MI 39% 10 Scranton, PA $ 717
11 Baton Rouge, LA 38% 11 McAllen, TX $ 716
12 Shreveport, LA 36% 12 Baton Rouge, LA $ 705
13 Madison, WI 36% 13 Spokane, WA $ 685
14 Hemet, CA 36% 14 Madison, WI $ 685
15 Stockton, CA 34% 15 Oxnard, CA $ 669
16 McAllen, TX 33% 16 Victorville–Hesperia–Apple Valley, CA $ 664
17 Victorville-Hesperia-Apple Valley, CA 32% 17 Shreveport, LA $ 663
18 Davenport, IA 31% 18 Stockton, CA $ 657
19 Syracuse, NY 30% 19 Modesto, CA $ 636
20 Modesto, CA 30% 20 Davenport, IA $ 591
21 Oxnard, CA 30% 21 Wichita, KS $ 591
22 Provo–Orem, UT 30% 22 Provo–Orem, UT $ 583
23 Lancaster, PA 27% 23 Ann Arbor, MI $ 571
24 Fort Wayne, IN 27% 24 Reading, PA $ 555
25 Ann Arbor, MI 26% 25 Corpus Christi, TX $ 549

In 2013 more than one quarter (28 percent) of the nation’s major urban roads– Interstates, freeways and other arterial routes – had pavements that were in substandard condition and provided an unacceptably rough ride to motorists, costing the average urban driver $516 annually. The nationwide annual cost of driving on deteriorated roads totals $109.3 billion.

In 2013 more than one quarter (28 percent) of the nation’s major urban roads– Interstates, freeways and other arterial routes – had pavements that were in substandard condition and provided an unacceptably rough ride to motorists, costing the average urban driver $516 annually. The nationwide annual cost of driving on deteriorated roads totals $109.3 billion.

“The nation’s rough roads stress nerves and cost billions in unnecessary vehicle replacement, repair and fuel costs,” said Jill Ingrassia, AAA managing director of government relations and traffic safety advocacy. “Full investment in our nation’s transportation system will reduce the financial burden on drivers and provide them with a smoother, safer and more efficient ride.”

The federal government is a critical source of funding for road and highway repairs. But the lack of adequate funding beyond the expiration of the current federal surface transportation program, MAP-21 (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act), which expires on July 31, 2015, threatens the future condition of the nation’s roads and highways.

“The long-term preservation and maintenance of our national transportation system depends on federal investment,” said Bud Wright, executive director of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). “We can do better than the uncertainty of short-term extensions. America needs Congress to fully fund a multi-year surface transportation bill.”

With vehicle travel growth rates returning to pre-recession levels and large truck travel anticipated to grow significantly, mounting wear and tear on the nation’s urban roads and highways is expected to increase the cost of needed highway repairs. Vehicle travel, which remained largely unchanged from 2008 to 2013, increased by 1.7 percent from 2013 to 2014 and increased 3.9 percent during the first four months of 2015 compared to the same period in 2014. And, the amount of large commercial truck travel in the U.S. is expected to increase by 72 percent from 2015 to 2030.

“The deteriorating condition of our nation’s urban roads threatens the health of the nation’s economy, reducing the efficiency of a region’s businesses and employers,” said Janet Kavinoky, Executive Director, Transportation and Infrastructure, U.S. Chamber of Commerce and vice president of the Americans for Transportation Mobility (ATM) Coalition. “Attracting jobs and expanding a region’s economy requires a well-maintained, efficient and safe transportation system. Funding needed transportation improvements must be a top priority at the federal, state and local levels and Congress must do its part by authorizing an adequately funded, long-term federal transportation bill.”

“With state and local governments struggling to fund needed road repairs and with federal surface transportation funding set to expire this month, road conditions are projected to get even worse,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Congress could reduce the extra costs borne by motorists driving on rough roads by authorizing a long-term, adequately funded federal transportation program that improves road conditions on the nation’s major roads and highways.”

Bumpy Roads Ahead:

America’s Roughest Rides and Strategies to Make our Roads Smoother

Executive Summary

Keeping the wheel steady on America’s roads and highways has become increasingly challenging as drivers encounter potholes and pavement deterioration. More than a quarter of the nation’s major urban roadways – highways and major streets that are the main routes for commuters and commerce – are in poor condition. These critical links in the nation’s transportation system carry 53 percent of the approximately 3 trillion miles driven annually in America.

With the rate of vehicle travel returning to pre-recession levels and local and state governments unable to adequately fund road repairs while the current federal surface transportation program is set to expire on July 31, 2015, road conditions could get even worse in the future.

In this report, TRIP examines the condition of the nation’s major urban roads, including pavement condition data for America’s most populous urban areas, recent trends in travel, the latest developments in repairing roads and building them to last longer, and the funding levels needed to adequately address America’s deteriorated roadways.

For the purposes of this report, an urban area includes the major city in a region and its neighboring or surrounding suburban areas. Pavement condition data are the latest available and are derived from the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) 2013 annual survey of state transportation officials on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways, based on a uniform pavement rating index. The pavement rating index measures the level of smoothness of pavement surfaces, supplying information on the ride quality provided by road and highway surfaces. The major findings of the TRIP report are:

More than a quarter of the nation’s major urban roads are rated in substandard or poor condition, providing motorists and truckers with a rough ride and increasing the cost of operating a vehicle.

  • More than one-quarter (28 percent) of the nation’s major urban roads – Interstates, freeways and other arterial routes – have pavements that are in substandard condition and provide an unacceptably rough ride to motorists.
  • An additional 41 percent of the nation’s major urban roads and highways have pavements that are in mediocre or fair condition, and 31 percent are in good condition.
  • Including major rural roads, 18 percent of the nation’s major roads are in poor condition, 40 percent are in mediocre or fair condition, and 42 percent are in good condition.
  • The 25 urban regions with a population of 500,000 or greater with the highest share of major roads and highways with pavements that are in poor condition and provide a rough ride are:

TRIP 1* An urban area includes the major city in a region and its neighboring or surrounding suburban areas.

  • The 25 urban regions with a population between 250,000 and 500,000 with the greatest share of major roads and highways with pavements that are in poor condition and provide a rough ride are:

TRIP 2* An urban area includes the major city in a region and its neighboring or surrounding suburban areas.

  • A listing of road conditions for each urban area with a population of 500,000 or more can be found in Appendix A. Pavement condition data for urban areas with a population between 250,000 and 500,000 can be found in Appendix B.
  • The average motorist in the U.S. is losing $516 annually — $109.3 billion nationally — in additional vehicle operating costs as a result of driving on roads in need of repair. Driving on roads in disrepair increases consumer costs by accelerating vehicle deterioration and depreciation, increasing the frequency of needed maintenance and requiring additional fuel consumption.
  • The 25 urban regions with at least 500,000 people, where motorists pay the most annually in additional vehicle maintenance because of roads in poor condition are:

TRIP3* An urban area includes the major city in a region and its neighboring or surrounding suburban areas.

  • The 25 urban regions with a population between 250,000 and 500,000 where motorists pay the most annually in additional vehicle maintenance because of roads in poor condition are:

TRIP4* An urban area includes the major city in a region and its neighboring or surrounding suburban areas.

 

  • A listing of additional vehicle operating costs due to driving on roads in substandard condition for urban areas with populations over 500,000 can be found in Appendix C. Additional vehicle operating costs for urban areas with a population between 250,000 and 500,000 can be found in Appendix D.

With vehicle travel growth returning to pre-recession rates and large truck travel anticipated to grow significantly, resulting in increased traffic and wear and tear on the nation’s urban roads and highways, the additional travel will increase the amount of road, highway and bridge investment which will be needed to improve conditions and to meet the nation’s transportation needs.    

  • Vehicle travel increased by 39 percent from 1990 to 2008. From 2008 to 2013, the amount of vehicle travel on the nation’s roadways remained largely unchanged, increasing by one half percent during the five year period.
  • Vehicle travel in the U.S. increased by 1.7 percent from 2013 to 2014. U.S. vehicle travel during the first four months of 2015 increased 3.9 percent from the same period in 2014.
  • Travel by large commercial trucks in the U.S. increased by 79 percent from 1990 to 2013. Large trucks place significant stress on roads and highways.
  • The level of heavy truck travel nationally is anticipated to increase by approximately 72 percent from 2015 to 2030, putting greater stress on the nation’s roadways.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report found that the U.S. currently has a $740 billion backlog in improvements needed to restore the nation’s roads, highways and bridges to the level of condition and performance needed to meet the nation’s transportation demands.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report found that the nation’s road, highway and bridge backlog included $392 billion in needed road and highway repairs to return them to a state of good repair; $112 billion needed in bridge rehabilitation and $237 billion in needed highway capacity expansions to relieve traffic congestion and support economic development.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report also found that the annual needed investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs is $120 billion, assuming that vehicle travel increases at a rate of one percent per year. This level of investment is 36 percent higher than the current annual spending of $88 billion.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report found that if the rate of vehicle travel increased by 1.4 percent per year that the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would increase to $144 billion and if vehicle travel grows by 1.6 percent annually the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would be $156 billion.

The federal government is a critical source of funding for road and highway repairs. But the lack of adequate funding beyond the expiration of the current federal surface transportation program, MAP-21 (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act), which expires on July 31, 2015, threatens the future condition of the nation’s roads and highways.      

Projects to improve the condition of the nation’s roads and bridges could boost the nation’s economic growth by providing significant short- and long-term economic benefits. 

  • Highway rehabilitation and preservation projects provide significant economic benefits by improving travel speeds, capacity and safety, and by reducing operating costs for people and businesses.   Roadway repairs also extend the service life of a road, highway or bridge, which saves money by postponing the need for more expensive future repairs.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Transportation agencies can reduce pavement life cycle costs by using higher-quality paving materials that keep roads structurally sound and smooth for longer periods, and by employing a pavement preservation approach that optimizes the timing of repairs to pavement surfaces.

  • There are five life-cycle stages of a roadway pavement: design, construction, initial deterioration, visible deterioration and pavement disintegration and failure.
  • A 2010 Federal Highway Administration report found that an over-reliance on short-term pavement repairs will fail to provide the long-term structural integrity needed in a roadway surface to guarantee the future performance of a paved road or highway.
  • The 2010 Federal Highway Administration report warned that transportation agencies that focus only on current pavement surface conditions will eventually face a highway network with an overwhelming backlog of pavement rehabilitation and replacement needs.
  • A properly implemented pavement preservation approach to keeping pavements in good condition has been found to reduce overall pavement life cycle costs by approximately one-third over a 25-year period.
  • Initial pavement preservation can only be done on road surfaces that are structurally sound. Roads that have significant deterioration must be maintained with surface repairs until sufficient funds are available to reconstruct the road, at which time a pavement preservation strategy can be adopted.
  • The use of thicker pavements and more durable designs and materials for a particular roadway are being used to increase the life span of road and highway surfaces and delay the need for significant repairs. These new pavements include high performance concrete pavements and asphalt pavements which have a perpetual pavement design.

Adequate funding allows transportation agencies to reconstruct roadways that are structurally worn out and adopt the following recommendations for insuring a smooth ride.

  • Implement and adequately fund a pavement preservation program that performs initial maintenance on road surfaces while they are still in good condition, postponing the need for significant rehabilitation.
  • Use pavement materials and designs that will provide a longer-lasting surface when critical routes are constructed or reconstructed.
  • Resurface roads in a timely fashion using pavement materials that are designed to be the most durable, given local climate and the level and mix of traffic on the road.
  • Invest adequately to ensure that 75 percent of local road surfaces are in good condition.

All data used in the report are the latest available. Sources of information for this report include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT), the AAA, the Texas Transportation Institute, the Transportation Research Board and the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

America’s Top 10 Transportation Projects

America’s Top 10 Transportation ProjectsAmerica’s Top 10 Transportation Projects

America’s Top 10 Transportation Projects Competing for Two National Awards: 7th Annual Contest Sponsored by AASHTO, AAA and US Chamber of Commerce

CAThe American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, AAA, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce recently announced the 2014 America’s Transportation Awards competition top 10 projects.

“While all 73 projects nominated deserve recognition for their contributions to improving transportation in America, these 10 remaining projects are the best of the best,” said Bud Wright, AASHTO executive director. “This competition recognizes excellence in project delivery. It’s about saving time and taxpayers’ money and improving the ability of people, manufacturers, farmers and service providers to move themselves and their goods, reliably, every day.”

This year, a record 36 states and the District of Columbia entered 73 projects that were judged in three categories: “Under Budget,” “Best Use of Innovation,” and a new category this year “Quality of Life/Community Development.”

The 10 finalists received the highest number of overall points during four regional competitions. The nation will decide through online voting which of the projects will receive the People’s Choice Award. A panel of experts will select the Grand Prize winner.

The Grand Prize and People’s Choice award winners will each earn a $10,000 donation from AASHTO on behalf of the winning state DOT to a charity or scholarship fund of its choosing. Both awards will be presented Nov. 23 at the AASHTO Annual Meeting in Charlotte.

Online voting begins today, Sept. 8, and will continue through Friday, Oct. 24, at http://AmericasTransportationAwards.org. Individuals are welcome to vote up to 10 times per day for their favorite projects.

The top 10 finalists in alphabetical order are:

  • California—San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge: California Department of Transportation’s $6.3 billion San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge project completely replaced a nearly 80-year-old structure with a new, modern bridge featuring advanced earthquake response technology. The bridge is also built to accommodate future expansions in light rail, bus, and other modes of transportation.
  • Colorado—September 2013 Flood Response: Colorado Department of Transportation’s $50 million quick and efficient response to damage caused by the major September 2013 floods greatly improved the lives of state residents. CDOT coordinated with the National Guard, local leaders and residents, and private contractors to reopen the last of the closed roadways in December 2013, just 10 weeks after the catastrophic event.
  • Florida—Mathews Bridge Impact & Emergency Repair Project: Florida DOT’s $3.8 million Mathews Bridge Impact and Emergency Repair Project required a fast and efficient fix for a major Jacksonville crossing that was struck by a naval ship. The bridge reopened for traffic 12 days ahead of schedule and only 33 days after the collision.
  • Illinois/Missouri—Mississippi River Bridge: Illinois and Missouri DOTs joined forces to complete the $229.5 million Mississippi River Bridge Project, a project to reduce congestion and improve safety for the St. Louis crossing. The project reduced delays and congestion for the nearly 120,000 daily commuters between St. Louis City, Missouri, and St. Clair County, Illinois. The project also saved $37 million in taxpayer funds.
  • Indiana—I-65/I-70 Split: Indiana Department of Transportation’s $12.4 million I-65/I-70 South Split Project increased safety by constructing the lower one-half mile of pavement beneath seven bridges. By reducing construction time from the typical 90 days down to 44 days, the project costs decreased from $20 million to $12.4 million, all while minimizing impacts to freight carriers and motorists.
  • New York—I-84 Bridges Replacement over Dingle Ridge Road: The $10.2 million project by NYSDOT replaced two deficient bridges on I-84, and utilized a new construction technique that reduced the two-year construction project to only two weekends and minimized delays on this major route between New York and Connecticut.
  • Ohio—S. Route 33 Nelsonville Bypass: Ohio Department of Transportation’s $200 million Nelsonville Bypass project relieved a major congestion problem for US 33 by constructing a four-lane bypass highway. Combined with other local road improvements, the project reduced travel time through the area by 30 minutes and offered a faster route through southeast Ohio.
  • Rhode Island—Pawtucket Bridge Replacement: RIDOT Pawtucket Bridge Replacement project restored full use of an essential interstate highway by replacing a deficient bridge. The bridge replacement on Interstate 95 made the roadway safer and was completed $46 million under its $123 million budget.
  • Texas—SH99/Grand Parkway Segment E: Texas Department of Transportation’s $320 million SH99/Grand Parkway, Segment E project represents the newest section of a planned 185-mile loop around the Houston metro region. Segment E improves system linkage within the existing transportation network and it will mitigate congestion on numerous roadway segments on the state’s “100 most congested” list.
  • WYWyoming—Togwoteemnbvgfcvgbhgfdghjhgfdfghjuytr4er5t6y77654356654356754345698 Trail to Yellowstone: Wyoming Department of Transportation’s $146.2 million Togwotee Trail to Yellowstone project increased safety and mobility by upgrading a 50-year-old road on a major route leading to Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park. New shoulders, passing lanes and upgraded bridges and parking facilities allow a safer trip through some of America’s most beautiful scenery.

Cast your vote today!