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AEM Reports: WHAT LEADING CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES ARE DOING IN THE WAKE OF COVID-19

As COVID-19 (coronavirus) brings countless businesses to a grinding halt, the construction industry remains resilient — even in the face of tremendous challenge.

Unlike many industries where “working from home” and “drive-thru service” are feasible countermeasures, construction firms have jobsites to run. Chris Hopper, executive vice president and general manager of Skanska, told the Cincinnati Business Courier, “You can’t hang drywall from your house.”

Skanska is a New York-based construction and development firm with projects throughout the country. The company employs more than 10,000. Skanska has developed a multi-faceted COVID-19 response plan to help keep employees safe and jobsites operational.

We looked at what Skanska and other leading construction firms are doing in the wake of COVID-19.

14 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A COVID-19 RESPONSE PLAN FOR CONTRACTORS

  1. Understand and follow CDC guidelines
  2. Place restrictions on travel
  3. Develop screening measures for employees who have recently traveled
  4. Instruct employees to stay home if they are feeling sick
  5. Place restrictions on in-person meetings and other employee gatherings
  6. Encourage employees to work from home if feasible
  7. Train all employees on the 6-foot distancing rule, no handshakes, etc.
  8. Establish thorough cleaning protocols at offices and jobsites
  9. Increase availability of cleaning supplies and handwashing stations at offices and jobsites
  10. Donate N95 respirator masks to local hospitals
  11. Tell elected officials to put partisan bickering aside in this very critical moment of national crisis
  12. Establish dedicated and empowered COVID-19 response teams
  13. Stay up to date on both federal and local COVID-19 developments
  14. Maintain clear, honest and ongoing communication with employees and subcontractors, and perhaps clients and suppliers

BEST PRACTICES TO HELP MITIGATE EXPOSURE

Social distancing is a critical component of any COVID-19 response plan. Turner Construction Company, a New York-based firm that employs roughly 10,000, has begun limiting the size of employee gatherings and has already put a stop to large group meetings. Attending events such as conferences has also been suspended. Remote conferencing technology is now being utilized for meetings. On that note, Turner Construction has expanded its network capacity and training tools to accommodate this surge in online network activity.

Sometimes an essential meeting that requires in-person attendance must take place. Turner Construction mandates that these meetings occur in spaces allowing for adequate social distancing. The CDC recommends that people remain roughly 6 feet apart. Additionally, Turner Construction is adapting standard operating procedures to limit the number of employees in an elevator or hoist at a given time.

Harkins, an employee-owned construction company based in Maryland, constantly reminds employees about the 6-foot rule. Additionally, sick employees are sent home immediately. All gatherings such as lunches are forbidden, and all meetings are now conducted remotely via Microsoft Teams.

Monitoring employees who travel has been another point of focus for construction companies.

Skanska issued a ban on all international travel through at least April. Domestic travel has also been greatly limited.

Turner Construction has restricted all business travel to any CDC Level 3 country, which is a country deemed to have widespread transmission. Also, if any employee had traveled to or had close contact with anyone who traveled to one of these countries, that employee is not allowed onto a Turner jobsite or office for 14 days from the date of contact. Taking it a step further, any employee who exhibits any of the common COVID-19 symptoms is instructed to stay away from Turner jobsites and facilities. Symptoms include fever, cough and restricted breathing.

PROMOTE GOOD HYGIENE

Hygiene has also been at the top of the list for Turner Construction. All jobsites are required to provide access to handwashing stations. Additionally, staff has been trained to religiously clean and disinfect frequently touched objects such as lunch tables, coffee machines and door knobs.

Harkins has instituted a long list of jobsite protocols to help improve awareness. For example, CDC and OSHA guidelines are now posted in all conspicuous locations on jobsites. Furthermore, jobsite leaders are trained to closely monitor employee behavior to ensure that the guidelines are being followed.

Harkins has also taken steps to step up jobsite cleaning. Trailers are now cleaned daily. Furthermore, a commercial cleaning service is brought in to clean and disinfect certain areas of a jobsite if COVID-19 exposure is suspected to have taken place. Harkins has also increased the volume of hand sanitizing products deployed to jobsites.

ESTABLISH DEDICATED TEAMS — AND EMPOWER THEM

Skanska has established a Coordination Response Team in each market it serves. Teams are tasked with monitoring COVID-19 developments, sharing information with employees and business partners, and implementing protocols.

Turner Construction has also established a dedicated COVID-19 Action Team. Efforts to support employees are an essential part of this team’s focus. Support is a key element that can get overshadowed in the midst of everything that is going on. This crisis has been taking a tremendous toll on many. Employers can play a constructive role in helping people cope.

On that note, Turner’s COVID-19 Action Team has gathered information to help employees guard against coronavirus-related scams, which are unfortunately emerging on a regular basis. The company has established a “fraud alert page” where employees can receive up-to-date information.

MAINTAIN OPEN, HONEST COMMUNICATION

Skanska is utilizing its internal company website (intranet) to provide general updates on COVID-19. The intranet is also being used to reinforce guidelines and standard operating procedures. This same information is also available through the company’s mobile app.

As reported by the Cincinnati Business Courier, telling employees to stay home when they are not feeling well is a critical piece to maintaining a safe, functioning jobsite. To reinforce the importance of this policy, HGC Groups, a large regional general contractor based in Cincinnati, has temporarily stopped recording unscheduled absences. In other words, an employee who thinks they may have COVID-19 symptoms will not be penalized for calling in sick to work.

LIFE HAS CHANGED, BUT STILL GOES ON

In Orlando, Fla., work on a $2.15 billion airport project continues amidst the COVID-19 crisis. As reported by the Orlando Business Journal, several guidelines have been put into place so work can continue:

  • Employees showing signs of illness are sent home
  • Additional handwashing stations have been made available
  • More frequent cleaning of high touch point areas like stairwells
  • Administrative staffs are evaluated for possible shift adjustments to limit personal interaction

The economic toll of COVID-19 has already set in. That said, some financial analysts expect that industries like manufacturing and construction will be among the last to begin issuing layoffs. That is due to the significant shortage of skilled workers these industries have been experiencing.

Rather, construction firms are expected to take proactive measures to help protect their workers and ongoing projects. The best practices outlined in this article showcase what leading construction firms are already doing in this regard.

LOBBY FOR RELIEF … AND LEAD BY EXAMPLE

The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) says it has been lobbying for the construction industry to be deemed “essential” as government officials issue new mandates for certain business closures. AGC has also expressed support for a $2 trillion relief package that, as of March 23, the U.S. Senate had failed to pass on numerous occasions.

In addition, the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), show owner and producer of CONEXPO-CON/AGG, says it is working closely with federal, state and local officials to make sure they take immediate steps to contain the spread of COVID-19, support equipment manufacturers and their employees, maintain vital supply chains and ensure the country’s economic resilience. AEM sent a letter to the President requesting that the federal government designate equipment manufacturers, suppliers, and dealers as “essential” and providing state and local jurisdictions with a clear and consistent federal directive moving forward.

AEM continues to urge Congress and the President to take action on the following policies that would support the construction industry:

It is important for construction companies to help bring this message to state and federal leaders. The sooner Congress comes together to pass relief, the sooner financial markets can be stabilized.

While businesses and citizens wait for our nation’s leaders to put their partisan bickering aside and come together in the face of this unprecedented national crisis, the construction industry is showing that it is possible to put the nation’s interests ahead your own.

The CEO of 3M recently told CNBC that he was disappointed that N95 respirator masks are still on store shelves while hospitals face a shortage. To be fair, that could simply be the result of inventory that already existed in the pipeline. Regardless, it is up to retailers to decide if it is in the nation’s best interest to redirect that inventory to local health care facilities.

Some construction companies have already determined that it is in the nation’s best interest.

An ABC television affiliate in Columbus, Ohio, recently reported that area construction companies have answered Vice President Mike Pence’s call to redirect respirator masks to hospitals. More construction companies around the country can follow suit by simply reaching out to their local hospitals and health care facilities.

That is leadership by example, and the construction industry does it as well as anybody.

By adopting the COVID-19 prevention protocols outlined in this article, construction companies can continue leading by example — all while helping to “flatten the curve” and help the nation emerge from this crisis.

Join over 40,000 industry peers who receive construction industry news and trends each week. Subscribe to CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365.

AED Tells Mayors, Governors to Keep Construction Projects Going

On March 19, 2020,  Associated Equipment Distributors delivered letters to national organizations representing mayors, local elected officials and the nation’s governors, urging them to allow construction projects to continue while highlighting the equipment industry’s integral role in building and maintaining our nation’s essential infrastructure.

In a letter to the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National League of Cities, AED was joined by the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), delivering the message that, “shutting down construction projects in cities and towns not only jeopardizes continued relief and prevention efforts surrounding COVID-19, but will also exacerbate an already dire situation with little safety or health benefit.”

AED delivered a similar letter to the National Governors Association, imploring its members to reconsider halting construction projects across the country. Additionally, AED joined AEM and the Equipment Dealers Association in letters to all 50 governors stressing that equipment manufacturers, suppliers, dealers, and service technicians must be considered essential to economic continuity as governors continue to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic to protect the health and safety of all workers and residents.

In Washington D.C., AED has been working with business organizations to ensure lawmakers and the administration understand the importance of liquidity and access to capital for the equipment industry. AED joined allied business organizations outlining tax modifications that will help provide liquidity for small-medium-sized companies.

To view the letter to the League of Cities and the U.S. Conference of Mayors, click here.

To view the letter to the National Governors Association, click here.

To view the letters to each Governor, click here.

Established in 1919, Associated Equipment Distributors (AED) is an international trade association based in Schaumburg, IL, representing over 700 construction equipment distributors, manufacturers and industry-service firms nationwide. AED members sell, service and rent equipment to such markets as heavy and light construction, mining, agriculture, forestry, aggregates, engines and industrial. 

 

Five Manufacturing Trends to Watch in 2020

By Mike Schmidt, AEM

Both the immediate and long-term future of the manufacturing industry will be defined by the development of several ever-evolving and cutting-edge trends and technologies. Many of these trends and technologies are poised to have a significant impact in 2020 and beyond, so it’s critically important for manufacturers to develop a keen understanding of what they are, how they will grow over time, and how they will impact those within the industry – both this year and in the future.

With that in mind, let’s look at five manufacturing trends to watch in 2020:

Wearable Technology

The rise of the Internet of Things (IoT) in industrial applications has given way to the increased prevalence of wearable technology in the manufacturing industry. Manufacturers of all types and sizes are increasingly looking into – and investing in – wearable devices with different sensors that can be used by their workforce.

According to a recent article from EHS Today, electronic features found in wearable devices allow for organizations to monitor and increase workplace productivity, safety and efficiency. In addition, employers are now readily capable of collecting valuable information, tracking activities, and providing customized experiences depending on needs and desires.

Improvements in bio-sensing now allow for health parameters such as body temperature, heart rate and blood oxygen levels to be monitored. Furthermore, employers now have the ability to leverage the data they obtain to complement welfare programs and reduce healthcare costs.

Factors leading to the increased adoption of wearable technology include portability, convenience, operational efficiency, and much more. Consumers use the technology for fitness and health tracking, mobile notifications at a glance, and even contactless payments. The business world has taken notice, and wearable technology is quickly becoming a fixture in manufacturing.

An article from Manufacturing.net notes that potential applications in the manufacturing sector include safety awareness and injury prevention, training, process improvements, situational awareness, augmented reality, remote management, as well as authentication and security planning.

Manager Technical Industrial Engineer working and control robotics with monitoring system software and icon industry network connection on tablet. AI, Artificial Intelligence, Automation robot arm

Predictive Maintenance

Effective equipment maintenance is central to the success of any manufacturer. So it goes without saying that the ability to predict impending failures and mitigate downtime is incredibly valuable. Predictive maintenance offers that and much more. Ultimately, it gives manufacturers the means to optimize maintenance tasks in real time, extending the life of their machinery and avoiding disruption to their operations.

Seebo outlines predictive maintenance for Industry 4.0 as a method of preventing asset failure by analyzing production data to recognize patterns and identify potential issues before they occur. Predictive maintenance for Industry 4.0 is a method of preventing asset failure by analyzing production data to identify patterns and predict issues before they happen.

Predictive maintenance isn’t without its challenges, however. In order to successfully build a predictive maintenance model, manufacturers must gain insights on the variables they are collecting and how often certain variable behaviors occur on the factory floor.

It’s absolutely critical for organizations to possess knowledge about each specific machine and a strong data set of previous failures in which they can review. Manufacturers also have to make decisions around lead time, as the closer to failure the machine is allowed to go, the more accurate the prediction.   

5G/Smart Manufacturing

The fourth Industrial Revolution isn’t coming. It’s already arrived. Smart factories are becoming the norm in manufacturing, and they rely on connected devices to leverage technologies like automation, artificial intelligence, IoT and more. In addition, these devices are capable of sensing their environments and interacting with one another. As factories of the future continue to grow and develop, manufacturers need to realize that they must be able to adapt the networks that connect them – efficiently and effectively.

According to a recent article from AT&T, 5G networks offer the industry opportunities to create new revenue streams. Along with energy and utility, the manufacturing industry stands to benefit the most from the rise of 5G. A report from Ericsson states that “the expected addressable market in 2026 will $113 billion, a substantial 7 percent potential revenue growth from current service revenue forecasts.”

The factories of tomorrow will rely greatly on sensor technology, and they will prominently feature connected tools, utilizing data to guide the tasks of the workforce. According to AT&T, 5G’s high capacity, wireless flexibility and low-latency performance make it the perfect choice to support manufacturers in these efforts.

Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

When it comes to using augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) in manufacturing, the possibilities are endless. Whether it’s helping make processes more efficient, improving product design and development, or maintaining machinery more effectively, these technologies are capable of becoming game-changers in the coming years.

Virtual reality allows its users to move around a 360-degree virtual world and – in some cases – even interact with it. When using virtual reality, real, physical surroundings are no longer a factor. And, thanks to advancements in technology, the virtual world is now being reproduced better than ever before. Augmented reality differs in the sense that its users are required to be at a specific location to augment their experience of reality, while those who use virtual reality are completely immersed in a virtual world.

According to an article from PwC, manufacturers are becoming more adept at finding ways to incorporate these technologies within their organizations in an effort to drive a future defined by digital connectivity. And, says PwC, one in three manufacturers have adopted – or will adopt – virtual reality and augmented reality in the next three years.

Cybersecurity

The importance of cybersecurity in manufacturing cannot be overstated. More and more connected devices are being integrated into organizational processes each day, so it almost goes without saying that the manufacturing industry needs to develop a keen understanding of how to best deal with them.

As the industry becomes more connected with time, equipment manufacturers and their customers will be impacted in a number of ways. For example, even the simple act of charging a mobile device in a nearby USB port may lead to dire consequences. As a result, companies must be diligent in their efforts to educate employees on the potential consequences of their cyber activities.

The ability for a manufacturer to effectively protect itself today hinges upon its willingness to take the following two key steps: address organizational concerns and implement a clear and effective cybersecurity strategy.

Cybersecurity is – and will – remain a major concern for companies of all types and sizes. With malware attacks on the rise and many organizations having been negatively affected by the increased prevalence of ransomware, companies (both literally and figuratively) can’t afford to overlook cybersecurity as a top priority in 2020 and beyond.Looking for more information about the latest trends and technologies impacting the manufacturing industry in 2020 and beyond? Visit aem.org/think and subscribe to the AEM Industry Advisor.

This feature appeared in the February 2020 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & Engineer, Construction, Construction Digest, Construction News, Constructioneer, Dixie Contractor, Michigan Contractor & Builder, Midwest Contractor, New England Construction, Pacific Builder & Engineer, Rocky Mountain Construction, Texas Contractor, Western Builder

2020: THE MANUFACTURING ELECTION

By Kip Eideberg, AEM Senior Vice President of Government & Industry Relations

A view from 2017 of the US Capitol after the recent restorations.

This year, Americans will head to the polls to decide which party controls state capitals, the U.S. House of Representatives, the U.S. Senate, and the White House. It’s something that happens only once every four years, and the outcome of the 2020 election will have a significant impact on equipment manufacturers, the manufacturing sector, and the U.S. economy for years to come.

Voters consistently rank the economy as a top issue when heading into the voting booth. It’s a trend that recent polling by national surveying group Morning Consult shows will continue this year. What’s also going to be important this year, according to this month’s poll, is how well 2020 candidates present their ideas on how to keep manufacturing strong in the U.S.

The vast majority of registered U.S. voters, 91 percent, say manufacturing is critical or important to keeping the economy strong. The recent survey also shows that more than three-quarters of U.S. voters believe presidential candidates should prioritize manufacturing as part of their 2020 platforms – and that number grows in manufacturing-heavy swing states like Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan.

2020 candidates must take note. They can position themselves as champions of manufacturing by outlining how they would protect and grow the sector through pro-manufacturing policies like infrastructure investment, free and fair trade, workforce development, and supporting farmers and working families by passing policies to keep rural communities strong. That will resonate with the 91 percent of registered U.S. voters who value keeping manufacturing strong. For example, the recent poll shows seven in 10 voters are more likely to support candidates running for office if they support efforts to bolster the economy of rural America and prepare students for careers in manufacturing.

However, from a policy perspective, the last several years have resulted in mixed results for manufacturers. On one hand, the 2018 tax reform bill, the 2018 Farm Bill, and a modernized North American trade agreement provided by the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) are all policy wins for equipment manufacturers and our industry’s 1.3 million men and women. On the other hand, the ongoing trade war with China and the use of protectionist tariffs, as well as the failure by Washington lawmakers to reach across the aisle to pass a comprehensive infrastructure package, has offset those wins. Altogether, it’s resulting in a less certain future for manufacturers.

For example, two recent manufacturing indexes by IHS Markit and ISM show a sharp divergence when it comes to whether U.S. manufacturing is expanding or contracting. While ISM’s evaluation shows the worst manufacturing report in a decade, Markit shared a stable reading over 52. The mixed signals are being felt by U.S. voters. That same, new poll out this month shows 45 percent of registered voters believing manufacturing is in the decline and 47 percent believe there will be fewer manufacturing jobs in the future.

This makes the 2020 election ripe for AEM and the entire equipment manufacturing industry to ensure the manufacturing and its current and future role the U.S. economy becomes a dominate theme throughout this year’s campaign season. That’s why AEM is engaging in several election-year activities promoting manufacturing issues with voters.

For example, next month on Sunday, February 16, AEM will co-host the “Moving America Forward” presidential candidate forum in Las Vegas, featuring the top Democratic presidential candidates for an opportunity to hear their ideas on how the U.S. can best address challenges facing America’s infrastructure. Infrastructure presents both an urgent challenge and a singular opportunity for any presidential administration to address since it’s an issue that affects every American. It’s also an issue that 90 percent of Americans believe should be a priority for the next administration.

AEM will also be leading the effort to engage and inform tens of thousands of the industry’s men and women across the country through the AEM 2020 Manufacturing Express, a national tour with over 50 stops over three months leading up to the November election. The bus tour will kick off directly following the Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee, in July, and feature state and local officials, members of Congress, presidential candidates, and other elected officials, to highlight the issues facing U.S. manufacturers before Americans head to the polls in November this year.

It’s clear American voters want strong leadership on manufacturing. It’s up to us to make sure 2020 candidates pay attention. 

Subscribe to the AEM Industry Advisor for more perspectives from AEM leaders.

USMCA is a Victory for Equipment Manufacturers

Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) president Dennis Slater issued the following statement after the President signed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement during a ceremony at the White House:
“President Trump and Congress have delivered a free trade agreement that works for equipment manufacturers, farmers, and working families across the country,” said Dennis Slater, president of AEM. “We thank President Trump, Vice President Pence, House Speaker Pelosi, and Senate Majority Leader McConnell for their leadership and for putting policy ahead of politics to get this landmark deal across the finish line. The agreement restores certainty to the North American market and secures duty-free access to our industry’s two largest export markets. It will help equipment manufacturers grow in the United States, compete globally, and support millions of family-sustaining jobs across the country. We look forward to working closely with President Trump and Congress to make sure equipment manufacturers can compete and win in the global economy.”
Several senior executives representing the equipment manufacturing industry also hailed today’s signing of the UMSCA by President Trump:

  • Komatsu America: “The strong bi-partisan support of the USMCA indicates how important it was to update our trading rules,” said AEM CE Chair Rod Schrader, Chairman & CEO, Komatsu America. “USMCA will allow American manufacturers to establish more predictable trade relations and helps ensure fair trade for our products with our important trading partners, Canada and Mexico.”
  • Blount International: “Increasing trade with Canada and Mexico, will help build our business, along with the entire agricultural industry by providing a growth base for equipment manufacturers like us,” said AEM Ag Chair Jerry Johnson, President, Farm, Ranch & Agriculture Division, Blount International. “Giving farmers more equitable trading opportunities with Mexico and Canada opens possibilities for growing net farm income, at a time when they are faced with lower commodity prices, higher input costs, global uncertainty, and an onslaught of weather-related disasters.”
  • Volvo Construction Equipment: “USMCA is essential for growth in the manufacturing backbone of the American economy—equipment manufacturers depend on low barriers to trade, especially with our closest neighbors,” said AEM CE Vice Chair Stephen Roy, Senior Vice President North America, Volvo Construction Equipment. “We commend the passage of this modern North American trade agreement and hope it signals continued bi-partisan work to create positive conditions for trade and industry.”
  • AGCO Corporation: “AGCO appreciates the work Congress and the Trump Administration have put forth to secure free and fair trade with Mexico and Canada,” said AEM Board Director Bob Crain, Senior Vice President and General Manager, AGCO Corporation. “The agreement signed by President Trump will greatly improve market stability for our customers and dealers in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Agriculture is the backbone of our economy. This agreement will directly benefit American farmers, U.S. equipment manufacturers and the rural communities that rely on these important sectors of our economy, by supporting jobs and bringing needed financial stability back to the agricultural landscape.”
  • Case IH: “Case IH is pleased to see the passage of USMCA; there are improvements made in USMCA that support America’s farmers, rural communities and businesses,” said AEM Board Director Scott Harris, Case IH Vice President, North America. With commodity price stagnation and global market uncertainty, solidifying and expanding the North American market is absolutely critical for the broader agricultural community, our core dealer partners, and customers.”
  • Caterpillar Inc.: “The USMCA is good for America and American manufacturing, allowing U.S. manufacturers to draw on the strengths of our North American trading partners to make U.S.-produced products more competitive globally,” says AEM Board Director, Phil Kelliher, Caterpillar vice president. “We appreciate the bipartisan support it received in Congress and are very pleased to see it signed into law.”
  • Gradall Industries: “The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement will modernize and strengthen trade with Mexico and Canada in ways that expand economic opportunity and increase competitiveness for equipment manufacturers in Ohio,” said AEM Board Director Michael Haberman, President, Gradall Industries. “It is an immediate shot in the arm for our industry and provides the long-term certainty that our industry needs to continue to grow and prosper.”
  • Vermeer Corporation: “As a manufacturer of large construction and agricultural equipment making an impact on communities around the world, we look forward to moves that make getting Vermeer equipment in the hands of those who need it easier than before,” said AEM Board Director Jason Andringa, President and CEO, Vermeer Corporation. “Today’s signing of the USMCA signals progress for manufacturers and markets across the country and beyond by removing uncertainty and paving the way for continued economic growth. Vermeer Corporation thanks the Administration and legislators in working together to get this done for America!” 

Since the creation of NAFTA two decades ago, equipment manufacturers have benefited greatly from duty-free market access to our industry’s two largest export markets, Canada and Mexico. The USMCA builds on the success of NAFTA to deliver an updated North American trade agreement for the 21st century. From its inception, AEM worked with both the Trump Administration and Congress to ensure passage of a trade agreement that fulfills many of our industry’s goals and strengthens equipment manufacturing in North America. AEM activated equipment manufacturing workers and supporters, reaching members of Congress with a steady stream of pro-USMCA letters, calls, and meetings. AEM also hosted the Honorable Mike Pence, Vice President of the United States, at an equipment manufacturing facility earlier this year to build support for the trade agreement, and ran a national public education campaign on the various benefits of USMCA. AEM is also a member of the 600 association and business-member strong USMCA Coalition. Equipment manufacturers support 1.5 million jobs and contributes $188 billion each year in the U.S. and Canada.   

AEM is the North American-based international trade group representing off-road equipment manufacturers and suppliers, with more than 1,000 companies and more than 200 product lines in the agriculture and construction-related industry sectors worldwide. The equipment manufacturing industry supports 1.3 million jobs in the U.S. Equipment manufacturers also contribute $159 billion to the U.S. economy. 
Visit www.aem.org/advocacy for more information.