Tag Archive for 'AISI'

Steel Group Lauds Senate Passage Of Bridge Amendment

UnknownThe American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) today applauded the Senate passage of an amendment to ensure that bridges most in need of repair are fixed ahead of any others. The measure, introduced by Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), calls for bridges that have been classified by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) as “functionally obsolete” or “structurally deficient” to receive priority consideration for new federal bridge funding under the $500 million “Bridges in Critical Corridors” fund.  The new program is included in the Transportation and Housing and Urban Development (THUD) appropriations bill.

Thomas J. Gibson, president and CEO of AISI, said, “Our nation’s infrastructure needs are at critical mass. According to the American Society of Civil Engineers, nearly 25 percent of our nation’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, and our deteriorating surface transportation infrastructure could cost the American economy more than 876,000 jobs.  Investments in surface transportation directly impact the competitiveness of the manufacturing sector, especially by increasing demand for steel fabricated products which creates valuable steel jobs.  Senator Portman’s amendment will help address this serious national concern and put critical bridge repair funds where they are needed most.”

America’s Steel Industry Is Leading Manufacturing Out Of The Recession

New report finds the American steel industry supported more than one million jobs in the U.S. economy in 2011; each job in U.S. steel industry supports seven jobs in the U.S. economy

A just-released report by Timothy J. Considine, professor of energy economics, University of Wyoming, reveals that the American steel industry is playing a significant role in leading manufacturing’s post-recession resurgence primarily because it is highly interrelated with many other sectors of the economy.

In his analysis titled, “Economic Impacts of the American Steel Industry,” Dr. Considine notes that, “Every one job in the U.S. steel industry supports seven jobs in the U.S. economy, reflecting its ripple effect on employment.”   For 2011, the report states, the American steel industry directly employed 150,700 and given the multiplier effect, supported more than 1,022,009 jobs.

In his report, Dr. Considine points out that the significant economic impact of the industry is based on the fact that steel is the most prevalent material in the economy, and the steel industry purchases a wide variety of inputs from other industries that create a favorable ripple effect.  “This is one reason why so many countries around the world welcome investments that establish steel mills, because they stimulate industrial supply chains,” he states.

These indirect impacts support jobs in industries supplying the steel industry with inputs of energy, materials and services, examples of which are identified in the report.  A third and final set of economic impacts arise from the stimulus that additional labor and capital income provides for households to spend on goods and services, the report explains.

“These so-called induced impacts together with the direct and indirect impacts constitute the total economic impact of the industry,” the report states.  “Thus, for every dollar increase in sales for iron and steel mills and ferroalloy industries, total output in the U.S. economy increases by $2.66.”

Based on the estimated 2011 direct steel sector employment of 150,700, the Considine report states that the steel sector supported 1,022,099 jobs in the U.S. economy, contributed over $101 billion in value added and $246 billion in gross output.  Based on tax multipliers utilized in the analysis, during 2011 the steel sector generated nearly $23 billion in local, state and federal taxes.

Dr. Considine’s analysis was commissioned by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) to provide an updated look at the American steel industry’s overall impact on the U.S. economy.   In his study, Dr. Considine employed the IMPLAN system developed by MIG, Inc., one of the most widely used and highly regarded systems for economic impact analysis.

The report describes the industry’s purchases of a highly diverse range of products and services, thus supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs along the supply chain.   For example, in 2010 the steel industry purchased more than $20 billion of materials produced in other industries, $8 billion of machinery, $4.4 billion from wholesale and retail trade sectors and more than $4 billion of transportation services.  It also generated $12.4 billion in labor income.

Click here to read the full report.

Click here to read the Key Findings.

AISI serves as the voice of the North American steel industry in the public policy arena and advances the case for steel in the marketplace as the preferred material of choice.  AISI also plays a lead role in the development and application of new steels and steelmaking technology.  AISI is comprised of 25 member companies, including integrated and electric furnace steelmakers, and 124 associate and affiliate members who are suppliers to or customers of the steel industry.  AISI’s member companies represent over three quarters of both U.S. and North American steel capacity.  For more news about steel and its applications, view AISI’s Web site at www.steel.org.

U.S. Industrial Sector Stands Alone in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The American Materials Manufacturing Alliance (AMMA), a group of energy-intensive, trade-exposed industries (EITEs) that includes The Aluminum Association, the American Chemistry Council (ACC), the American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA), the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI), and Portland Cement Association (PCA) today reported that between 1990 and 2008, industrials was the only sector of the U.S. economy in which greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions fell.  By contrast, during the same time period, GHG emissions rose in the commercial, electricity, residential, transportation and agricultural sectors.  Last week the U.S. Energy Information Administration reported that U.S. industrial GHG emissions fell more than three percent in 2009 – an “unprecedented” reduction for the industrial sector for a single year.

Driven largely by energy efficiency improvements, U.S. industrial GHG emissions fell 5.9 percent between 1990 and 2008. Meanwhile, commercial GHG emissions went up 36.9 percent, electricity increased 30 percent, residential increased 27.3 percent, transportation increased 21.6 percent and agriculture increased 11.3 percent.

“We’re proud of the industrial sector’s proven record of enhancing energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions, and we’re committed to further improvement,” said Cal Dooley, ACC president and CEO.   “Just last week, we honored twelve member companies  for implementing energy-efficiency improvements in 2009 that saved enough energy to power all the homes in a city the size of Dayton, Ohio, for one year.  Use of chemistry products in renewable energy and energy efficiency applications such as solar panels, wind turbines, building insulation and lightweight vehicles helps the rest of society save energy and reduce their GHG emissions, too.”

“We’ve taken the initiative to improve performance in energy efficiency, and we’ve reduced GHG emissions well beyond what would have been required under any international agreement” Tom Gibson, president and CEO of the American Iron and Steel Institute, said.  “Since 1990, the steel industry has reduced our greenhouse gas emissions by 33 percent. Before the onset of the recession, we were making more steel in the U.S. than we had ever before and we were doing it with and less energy and fewer emissions.”

“Energy efficiency is a smart strategy to help improve the environment while reducing operating costs and retaining good American jobs,” said Donna Harman, president and CEO of the American Forest and Paper Association.  “America’s forest products industry embraced renewable energy early on and today generates two-thirds of our own power on site from carbon-neutral, renewable biomass.  Our members have reduced their greenhouse gas emissions per ton of product by 14 percent since 2000, and while we are proud of the accomplishments we’ve made so far, we can achieve more with the right policies that protect our international competitiveness.”

“We’re proud of the improvements that our members have made in reducing their carbon footprints. The products that come from aluminum are contributing to energy savings and our manufacturing facilities are increasingly efficient,” stated Aluminum Association President Steve Larkin.

“The United States cement industry is dedicated to producing a superior product while addressing challenging manufacturing policies and procedures to improve energy efficiency.  This not only impacts our emissions and costs, but makes our communities better places,” said Brian McCarthy, Portland Cement Association president and CEO.  “The actions taken by our plants are at the forefront of manufacturing technology and position the industry as a key contributor to the development of the latest energy expertise.”