Tag Archive for 'American Road & Transportation Builders Association'

Short Video Message from ARTBA President & CEO David Bauer

North Dakota State University Professor Denver Tolliver Honored with ARTBA’s Research & Education Award

Dr. Denver Tolliver, the director of the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute (UGPTI) at North Dakota State University, is the 2018 recipient of the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s (ARTBA) prestigious S.S. Steinberg Award. He was honored Jan. 13 during the association’s annual Research & Education Division (RED) meeting, held in the Nation’s Capital.

Named after the founding president of RED, the award recognizes “an individual who has made remarkable contributions to transportation education.”

Over the course of his career, Tolliver has received more than $25 million in grants from federal and state agencies. He has also authored – or co-authored – 160 transportation research publications, including reports for the Research and Innovative Technology Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Federal Highway Administration, Federal Railroad Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Nebraska Department of Roads, and several state departments of transportation.

In addition to his position at UGPTI, Tolliver is the director of the Mountain-Plains Consortium, the U.S. DOT’s University Transportation Center in Federal Region 8; director of the interdisciplinary Transportation and Logistics graduate program at North Dakota State University; executive director of the Transportation Research Forum; and, chairman of the Transportation Leadership Graduate Certificate Program.

Prior to joining North Dakota State, Tolliver was a rail planner for the North Dakota Department of Transportation and a research assistant at the Center for Environmental Studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Design and Planning and a master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree in Geography from Morehead State University.

Established in 1902, Washington, D.C.-based ARTBA is the “consensus voice” of the U.S. transportation design and construction industry before Congress, federal agencies, the White House, news media and the general public.

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Schneidawind Named ARTBA Vice President of Public Affairs

 The American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) has tapped John Schneidawind as its new vice president of public affairs, effective January 3. A former business writer at USA Today, Schneidawind has decades of diverse communications experience in the private sector and with national associations.

Schneidawind will head ARTBA’s media relations initiatives. He will play a key role in the execution of the “Transportation Makes America Work” advocacy program, which is aimed at educating policymakers about the many positive impacts of strong transportation investment on the U.S. economy, job creation and quality of life.

Most recently, he spent eight years at the American Institute of Architects (AIA) as director of public affairs and media relations, augmenting AIA’s public policy voice on Capitol Hill and in statehouses across the country. He led external advocacy communications efforts and in 2017 waged a successful campaign to help win lower rates for architects in tax reform legislation. He also spearheaded an AIA effort to promote the values of the architecture profession and advanced its positions on immigration reform, climate change, and professional licensure.

Schneidawind has an extensive background in brand and reputation management, positioning companies for corporate restructurings, and in managing through crises. He led media relations for KPMG Consulting/BearingPoint through its initial public offering, acquisition strategy and a corporate governance crisis. He has also held corporate communications roles at telecommunications firms BellSouth Corp. and Neustar Inc.

A native of New Jersey, Schneidawind has a B.A. in communications from Seton Hall University. He resides in Arlington, Va.

Established in 1902, ARTBA is the “consensus voice” of the U.S. transportation design and construction industry in the Nation’s Capital.

For more information on ARTBA visit www.artba.org http://www.artba.org

 

ARTBA Reports: U.S. DOT Announces $1.5 Billion in New Transportation Grants

Secretary Chao, center, Dec. 11 announced the BUILD grants at U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) headquarters in Washington, D.C. She was joined by U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing &Urban Development (THUD) Chair Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and ranking member Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.), House Appropriations THUD Subcommittee Chair Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.) and ranking member Rep. David Price (D-N.C.), and Youngstown, Ohio, Mayor Jamael Brown.

By Eileen Houlihan, senior writer/editor, ARTBA

U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao Dec. 11 announced $1.5 billion in discretionary grant funding to 91 projects in 49 states and the District of Columbia. The grants are made through the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) Transportation Grants program and support road, rail, transit, and port infrastructure projects across the country.

Two-thirds of the projects involve roads. Some of the biggest awards include completing a 4.8-mile, four-lane interstate facility in southwest Missouri that will bypass US-71 and connect to Interstate 49 in Arkansas; repairing and upgrading approximately 3.5 miles of high-use service roads in the Lower Yukon River Regional Port in Alaska; extending the Hot Springs East-West Arterial Bypass in Arkansas; building improvements on approximately 9 miles of State Road 19 in Mississippi; and replacing approximately 77 bridges in 17 rural counties in North Carolina.

The grants will contribute to the construction or refurbishment of over 200 bridges nationwide, from North Carolina to the refurbishment of the Brooklyn Bridge. See the full list of projects.

BUILD grants were known previously as TIGER grants. The maximum grant award is $25 million for a single project, and no more than $150 million can be awarded to a single state. There is a $5 million minimum award for projects located in urban areas and a $1 million minimum for rural projects.

ARTBA Report to Congress Says Raise the Gas Tax to Address Interstates

By Eileen Houlihan, senior writer/editor, ARTBA

Congress should legislate an Interstate Highway System renewal and modernization program that focuses on reconstructing the aging and heavily-used infrastructure and pay for it in the near-term by increasing the federal gas tax, a new report to Congress says.

The “Renewing the National Commitment to the Interstate Highway System: A Foundation for the Future” report, released Dec. 6 by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine’s Transportation Research Board (TRB) and funded through the 2015 FAST Act surface transportation law, also calls for adjusting the federal fuel tax as needed to account for inflation and changes in vehicle fuel economy.

The report did not address a specific amount to raise the federal fuel taxes, but noted the current level of spending on the Interstates at $20 billion to $25 billion annually is “much too low – by at least 50 percent – to proceed with long-deferred rebuilding of the system’s aging and deteriorating pavements and bridges.” The committee said more than $30 billion per year is needed over the next 20 years to just repair and rebuild existing damage, and an additional investment of approximately $45 billion to $70 billion per year will be required to expand and manage the system’s capacity to handle future traffic.

It recommends lifting the ban on tolling of existing Interstate highways, a “rightsizing” of the system to address current and emerging demands and to remediate economic, social and environmental disruptions caused to some communities by the system, and address concerns about climate change and accommodate automated vehicles.

“As the nation moves further into the 21st century and as transformations, in the vehicle fleet and vulnerabilities due to climate change place new demands on the country’s transportation infrastructure, the prospect of an aging and worn Interstate Highway System that operates unreliably is concerning,” the report noted. The Interstate Highway System is a vital part of the U.S. economy. It is the foundation of the National Highway System (NHS) – which includes ties to ports, airports and other major intermodal transportation facilities.  Although the NHS represents just 4 percent of public roads, it carries more than 40 percent of the nation’s highway traffic and 70 percent of the truck freight traffic that moves people and goods across the country.

The report added that when much of the Interstate system was built in the 1960s and 1970s, little was known about the threat of climate change. The report recommends transportation agencies across the country make changes to how they plan, design, construct operate and maintain the system to make it more resilient and less vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

In addition, Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), in a Dec. 7 op-ed in The Washington Post, said “any infrastructure bill that wants Democratic support in the Senate” will have to include policies and funding that help transition the country to a clean-energy economy and mitigate the risks the U.S. faces from climate change.

TRB’s 14-person committee to research the Interstate report included 2006 ARTBA Chairman Dr. Michael Walton of the University of Texas at Austin.

Walton, who spoke during a webinar at the TRB release of the report, said much of the funding and financing question will vary by state, citing, for example, tolling. “What works in one state may not in others,” Walton noted. The original Interstate highway construction program was a collaborative commitment among the states and the federal government. A comparable partnership is needed to ensure resiliency and respond to the changing demands of users, the report said.

ARTBA economic data continues to show that federal funds on average provide more than half of all annual state department of transportation capital outlays for highway and bridge projects.