Tag Archive for 'ARTBA'

Will 2018 Meet Expectations?

Will 2018 Meet Expectations?

By Greg Sitek

The future of the U.S. is shrouded in confusion, hostility, distrust, threats, uncertainty, criticism, discord, disasters, failing infrastructure, and an almost endless list of problems. But even so, we are experiencing a growing economy high employment rates, low inflation rates, strong housing market and an equally long list of positive things.

The U.S. ended 2017 with having a string of hurricanes – Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria – that caused around $200 Billion dollars in damages only to be followed by a season of fires that destroyed thousands of homes, building, thousands of acres of forests and intensified the stress on an exhausted infrastructure.

Thanks to the thousands of people who have and continue to pitch in with physical help, equipment, materials and supplies hurricane recovery and rebuilding is underway but will take years to accomplish. Groups like Team Rubicon and other veteran organizations along with donations of money and equipment by manufacturers, trade association, dealers, individuals and so many others have made it possible to push ahead with what is an overwhelming task. Healing is always a slow process.

In addition to the tests thrown at us by Mother Nature, we have had a cascade of political and social speed bumps adding hazards as we travel our road into the future slowing the forward momentum and intensifying the risk.

We know what 2017 was like. What can we expect for 2018 and beyond?

Economic forecasting is always tricky and unlike weather forecasting more critically important, especially for the forecaster. We’ve all heard the comment, “Being a weather forecaster is the only job where you can be wrong most of the time and not get fired.” This doesn’t apply to the economists who look at the conditions that are, that were and that will be.

Predictions for 2018 tend to be positive with most economists confident that we will sustain continued and improved national economic growth. I haven’t heard any of them forecasting a recession in the immediate future – the next six months and beyond.

We have included construction industry forecast from leading resources: Wells Fargo Economics Group, American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) and Associated Builders & Contractors (ABC). There are many others who do an excellent job of industry forecasting.

On that I wish we could have included but didn’t have room is:

Dodge Data & Analytics (https://www.construction.com/) recently released its 2018 Dodge Construction Outlook, a mainstay in construction industry forecasting and business planning. The report predicts that total U.S. construction starts for 2018 will climb 3% to $765 billion.

“The U.S. construction industry has moved into a mature stage of expansion,” stated Robert Murray, chief economist for Dodge Data & Analytics. “After rising 11% to 13% per year from 2012 through 2015, total construction starts advanced a more subdued 5% in 2016. An important question entering 2017 was whether the construction industry had the potential for further expansion. Several project types, including multifamily housing and hotels, have pulled back from their 2016 levels, but the current year has seen continued growth by single-family housing, office buildings, and warehouses. In addition, the institutional segment of the nonresidential building has been quite strong, led especially by transportation terminal projects in combination with gains for schools and healthcare facilities. As for public works, the specifics of a $1 trillion infrastructure program by the Trump Administration have yet to materialize, so activity continues to hover around basically the plateau for construction starts reached a couple of years ago. Total construction starts in 2017 are estimated to climb 4% to $746 billion.”

“For 2018, there are several positive factors which suggest that the construction expansion has further room to proceed,” Murray continued. “The U.S. economy next year is anticipated to see moderate job growth. Long-term interest rates may see some upward movement but not substantially. While market fundamentals for commercial real estate won’t be quite as strong as this year, funding support for construction will continue to come from state and local bond measures. Two areas of uncertainty related to whether tax reform and a federal infrastructure program get passed, with their potential to lift investment. Overall, the year 2018 is likely to show some construction project types register gains while other project types settle back, with the end result being a 3% increase for total construction starts. By major sector, gains are predicted for residential building, up 4%; and nonresidential building, up 2%; while nonbuilding construction stabilizes after two years of decline.”

Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) has posted a radio link on its CONEXPO-CON/AGG New update. To hear it you can do so at:

http://www.conexpoconagg.com/visit/conexpo-con-agg-radio-podcasts/

Industry Professionals from 34 States on Roster of “Safety Certified” Transportation Project Professionals

Industry professionals from 34 states, representing 43 companies and state agencies have earned the “Safety Certification for Transportation Project Professionals™” (SCTPP) credential between the September 2016 launch and December 2017, the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) Foundation announced today.  The certification is valid for three years.

The SCTPP program is aimed at the thousands of transportation project workers, supervisors, foremen, inspectors, managers, manufacturers and materials suppliers, designers, equipment operators and owners who could make a huge, industry-wide safety impact by learning core competencies necessary to identify and mitigate potentially life-threatening on-site risks.

The list of “Safety Certified Transportation Project Professionals” includes:

  • Juan Abrigo, Area Safety Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Irving, TX
  • Jes Allen, Superintendent, Zachry Construction Corporation, Cornelius, NC
  • David Asselin, Safety Director, Ranger Construction Industries, Port St. Lucie, FL
  • Harvey Baggett, Corporate Safety Director, J. F. Shea Construction, Inc., Stephens City, VA
  • Mannie Barnes, Construction Manager, Atkinson Construction, Kent, WA
  • Tyler Bean, HSE Regional Manager, Allan Myers, Worcester, PA
  • Trenton Beeler, Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Sherman, TX
  • Tim Beguin, Corporate Safety Director, Wiregrass Construction Company, Inc., Decatur, AL
  • Raymond Berrios, Safety Director, Ranger Construction Industries, West Palm Beach, FL
  • Peter Berrios, Safety Director SE Region,  OHL Community Asphalt, Miami, FL
  • Jason Boland, Project Engineer II, Allan Myers, Virginia Beach,  VA
  • Robert Boyle, Construction Manager, MBP, Shawboro, NC
  • Tyler Bradford, Senior Construction Engineer, Parsons, Fresno, CA
  • Josh Brown, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Williamsburg, VA
  • Travis Browning, Field Safety Manager, Superior Construction Company, Jacksonville, FL
  • Kenneth Burge,  Area Safety Manager, J.D. Abrams, L.P., Santa Fe, TX
  • Dennis Burks, Safety Director, HNTB Corporation, Kansas City, MO
  • Ruben Canales, Sr., Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Richmond, TX
  • Javier Cano, Safety Coordinator,  Zachry Construction Corporation, San Antonio, TX
  • Mickey Carr, Safety Director, Chemung Contracting, Mitchells, VA
  • James Deacon, Safety Manager, Allen Myers, Coopersburg, PA
  • Robert Clark, Project Manager, Superior Construction Company Southeast, LLC., Jacksonville, FL
  • Keith Clay, Safety Manager, John R. Jurgensen Company, Hamilton, OH
  • Sean Conard, Fleet Safety Director, Allan Myers, Williamsburg, VA
  • Brian Connolly, Regional Equipment Manager, Superior Construction Company, Frankfort, IL
  • David Cope, Environmental Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Rockwall, TX
  • David Dostaler, Corporate HSE Director, Kraemer North America, LLC,  Castle Rock, CO
  • Bruce Drewes, Instructional Consultant, 3T Group, Boise, ID
  • Steven Durbin, Area Safety Manager, The Lane Construction Corp, Follansbee, WV
  • Arthur  Emerson, Safety Director, Bryant Contracting INC., Toano, VA
  • Charles Esmacher, Field Representative, HNTB Michigan, Grosse Pointe Park, MI
  • Daniel  Estry, SR Safety Supervisor, LANE, Lakeland, FL
  • John Farrell, Regional HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Pottstown, PA
  • Colin Faulkner, Safety Director, ATS Construction, Lexington, KY
  • Michael Ferry, Safety Director, O&G Industries, West Hartford, CT
  • William French, Sr., Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Dallas, TX
  • Christopher Frum, Safety Manager, Wagman Heavy Civil, Petersburg, VA
  • Alfred Garcia, Project Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Port Lavaca, TX
  • Cory Gaye, Corporate Safety Director, Wagman, York, PA
  • Christopher Gilsdorf, Safety Engineer, Kraemer North America, Madison, WI
  • Christine Goins, Assistant Resident Engineer, RK&K, Wake Forest, NC
  • Pastor Gonzalez, Project Administrator, RK&K, Cutler Bay, FL
  • David Graham, Corporate Safety Director, B.A.T.S. Traffic Solutions, Anaheim, CA
  • Jennica Greffe, Project Manager, Superior Construction, Jacksonville, FL
  • Michael Grisko, Instructor, Local 172 SET, Folsom, NJ
  • Seth Hall, Field Safety Manager, Superior Construction, West Palm Beach, FL
  • Brody Hambright, Survey, Wright Brothers, Charleston, TN
  • Jeff Hanson, Vice President HSE & Risk, United Infrastructure Group, Inc., Great Falls, SC
  • Tony Hemmerly, Assistant Project Manager, Superior Construction Company SE, Jacksonville, FL
  • Randy Henson, Division Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Grand Prairie, TX
  • Adam Hill, Safety Coordinator,  Road-Con Inc., West Chester, PA
  • James Hinkle, Lead Engineer, MBP, Salem, VA
  • Justin Hobson, Safety Director, Talley Construction, Chattanooga, TN
  • Christopher Hughes, Project Engineer, Ohio Department of Transportation, Delphos, OH
  • Chris Iungerich, Safety Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., San Antonio, TX
  • Elisha Johnson, Field Manager,  Allan Myers, Richmond, VA
  • Gunnar Johnson, Field Engineer, Zachry Construction Corporation, Houston, TX
  • Nick Kaminer, Engineer, Key Constructors, LLC, Madison, MS
  • Peter Kaplan, Project Safety Manager, Wagman Heavy Civil, Baltimore, MD
  • Bruce Kay, Vice President of Construction Services, AECOM, Sewell, NJ
  • Edward Kernaghan, Vice President/General Manager, J F Shea Construction, Red Bluff, CA
  • Lucas Kessling, Project Manager, The Lane Construction Corporation, Shorewood, IL
  • Mindy King, EHS, RK Hall, LLC, Texarkana, AR
  • Matthew, Koss, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Baltimore, MD
  • Joseph Landino, Safety Director, Ajax Paving Industries, Inc., Troy, MI
  • Billy Laney, Safety Manager, Wiregrass Construction, Double Springs, AL
  • Evan Lawrence, Project Manager, Superior Construction Company, Panama City Beach, FL
  • Don Lindert, Jr., Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Ovilla, TX
  • Gregory Linenfelser, HSE Professional, Transurban, Alexandria, VA
  • Matt Lunzman, Superintendent, Hawkins Construction, Lincoln, NE
  • Thomas Maier, Risk Advisor, IMA Inc., Raymore, MO
  • Francis B. Maline, Project Safety Manager, Lane Construction Corporation, Westchester, IL
  • Jose Manzano, Safety Inspector, CW Roberts Contracting, Tallahassee, FL
  • Thomas  Markle, Area Safety Manager, Lane Construction, Windsor, ME
  • Eli Martinez, Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Dallas, TX
  • Timothy Maxwell, Project Engineer, Wright Brothers Construction Company, Inc., Asheville, NC
  • Edward Mays, Field Safety Coordinator, Barriere Construction LLC, Metairie, LA
  • Tobias Mazzoni, Project Manager, Superior Construction, Jacksonville, FL
  • Russell McElroy, Senior Safety Supervisor, Lane Construction, Charlotte, NC
  • Joel McGlothlin, Area Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Mansfield, TX
  • Matthew McMillan, Project Manager, Kiewit Infrastructure South Co, Peachtree City, GA
  • Robert Medina, Safety Officer, Hellman Electric Corporation, Bronx, NY
  • Seth Medwick, Department Head, HNTB, New York City, NY
  • Sue Mendoza, Senior Safety Supervisor, The Lane Construction Corporation, Justin, TX
  • James Milner, Project Manager, Superior Construction Company Southeast, LLC., Jacksonville, FL
  • Mason Mimnaugh, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Philadelphia, PA
  • Robert Montel, Safety Manager, Rieth-Riley Construction Co., Inc., Goshen, IN
  • Mauricio Montoya, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Richmond, VA
  • Robert Munoz, Senior Safety Supervisor, The Lane Construction Corporation, Lakeland, FL
  • John Calvin Myers, RK&K, Richmond, VA
  • Anthony Nanfro, Superintendent, Zachry Construction Corporation, Magnolia, TX
  • Frank Nesbitt, Senior Safety Supervisor, Lane Construction, West Columbia, SC
  • Gregory Nowak, Safety Representative, J.F. Shea Construction, Valparaiso, IN
  • Frank Ortega, Safety Manager, Superior Construction Company, Orlando, FL
  • William Pedigo, Safety Director, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Irving, TX
  • Timothy Penrose, Senior Civil Engineer, PA Department of Transportation, Bethlehem, PA
  • Todd Pfeiffer, VP Safety, Preferred Materials, Inc., Land O Lakes, FL
  • Ron Phillips, Sr. Safety Supervisor, Lane Construction Corporation, Fredericksburg, VA
  • Joseph Polansky, Director of HSE, Fred Smith Construction, Raleigh, NC
  • Stephanie Powers, Area Safety Manager, Lane Construction Corporation, Falls Church, VA
  • Darrell Pruitt, Regional Safety Director, Superior Construction Company, Montezuma, IN
  • David Putnam, HSE Manager,  Allan Myers, Havre de Grace, MD
  • Roger Rister, Safety Manager, Parsons Construction Group, Crown Point, IN
  • David Roberson, Building Division Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Seguin, TX
  • Emmett Russell, Safety Training Consultant, Safety Training Consultant, Upper Marlboro, MD
  • Richard Salcido, EHS Manager, The Ashton Company, Tucson, AZ
  • Mark Sanders, Safety Manager, HDR/ICA, Barlow, KY
  • Mike Scarborough, Senior Safety Director, Ranger Construction Industries, Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
  • Doug Schultz,  President, Herlihy Mid-Continent Company, Romeoville, IL
  • Michael D. Scolforo, Area Safety Manager, The Lane Construction Corporation, Lee, MA
  • John Scurek, Safety, Health & Environmental Manager, Parsons, Georgetown, TX
  • Jacob Selby, Field Engineer, Zachry Construction Corporation, North Richland Hills, TX
  • Khanjan Shah, Construction Project Engineer, RK&K, Laurel, MD
  • David Sherwood, CEO, Sherwood Construction, Tulsa, OK
  • Jeffrey Sienkiewicz, Project Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Flower Mound, TX
  • Sean Simpson, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Baltimore, MD
  • Erick Smith, Project Manager, The Lane Construction Corporation, Shorewood, IL
  • Bruce Sparrow, Project Engineer, Ooltewah, TN
  • Randy Spurlock, Safety Manager, Allan Myers, Bel Air, MD
  • Clay Stark, Project Manager,  Austin Bridge & Road, Midlothian, TX
  • Terry Stephens, Area Safety Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Irving, TX
  • Don Stephens, Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, San Antonio, TX
  • Alissa Sternagle, Area Safety Manager, Lane Construction, Charlotte, NC
  • Bryan Stone, Safety Director, Superior Construction Company, Jacksonville, FL
  • Chad Stone, EH&S Manager, RK Hall LLC- Summit Materials, Paris, TX
  • Michelle Teets, Mid-Atlantic Regional Safety Manager, Lane Construction Corporation, Norfolk, VA
  • Justin Templet, Safety and Claims Coordinator, Barriere Construction, Metairie, LA
  • Nathan Terry, Structures Superintendent, Zachry Construction Corporation, Porter, TX
  • William Tyson, Director Labor Relations, General Contractors Association of NY, New York, NY
  • Cheyenne Urban, Safety Representative, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Frisco, TX
  • Steven Ward, Safety Director, Advanced Workzone Services LLC, Muskogee, OK
  • Joseph Warren, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Virginia Beach, VA
  • Douglas Westervelt, Director of Safety Operations, Crossland Construction Company, Columbus, KS
  • Justin White, Senior Project Manager/Estimator, Barriere Construction, Covington, LA
  • Derek  Yeckel, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Fredericksburg, VA
  • Steven Yeckel, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Stafford, VA
  • Joseph Yuhas, Technical Consultant, Liberty Mutual Insurance, Minneapolis, MN
  • Todd Zimmerman, General Superintendent, Crossland Heavy Contractors, Columbus, KS

The two-and-a-half hour exam contains up to 120 multiple-choice questions that probe knowledge in assessing project risks, creating project safety plans, implementing and conducting on-going evaluation of a site-specific operational safety plan, and conducting incident investigations.  It has been designed to meet the rigorous protocols required for accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization ISO/IEC 17024: “Conformity Assessment: General Requirements for Bodies Operating Certification of Persons.”

Eight courses to help prep for the exam are available via the ARTBA Online Learning Center (OLC).

Additional information about the SCTPP credential and the OLC can be found at www.puttingsafetyfirst.org.

The ARTBA Foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entity established in 1985, supports a wide portfolio of programs and activities, including educational scholarships, awards programs, professional development courses, safety training, a national exhibition on transportation and a facility dedicated to improving safety in roadway construction zones.

ARTBA Foundation Announces Key 2018 Scholarship, Awards & Recognition Program Deadline

 
 The American Road & Transportation Builders Association Transportation Development Foundation (ARTBA-TDF) has announced key deadlines for its 2018 scholarship, awards and recognition programs. They include:

Lanford Family Highway Worker Memorial Scholarship Program
Established in 1999, this first-of-its-kind scholarship fund provides post-high school financial assistance to the children of highway workers killed or permanently disabled on the job. More than 125 scholarships have been awarded to worthy students.

Application deadline: April 6.

Helping Hand Awards
The awards recognize businesses with extraordinary programs—outside the scope of normal business operations—that demonstrably benefit and help improve the quality of life in the community where they are based or conduct business.

Nomination deadline: April 10.

Transportation Development Hall of Fame
The Hall of Fame recognizes individuals or families from the public and private sectors who have made extraordinary contributions to U.S. transportation development over their lifetime and demonstrated exceptional leadership.  Nominations are considered in two categories:

  • Transportation Design & Construction Industry Innovators: Honors the men and women who discovered or created a “game-changing” product or process that significantly advanced transportation design, construction and/or safety.
  • Transportation Design & Construction Industry Leaders (Individuals or Families): Honors men, women and families who have made significant contributions—beyond just having successful businesses or careers—that have notably helped advance the interests and image of the transportation design, construction and safety industry.

Nomination deadline: April 20.

Application and nomination forms can be found at www.artbatdf.org. Please contact ARTBA’s Eileen Houlihan with questions: ehoulihan@artba.org.

Established in 1985, the ARTBA Foundation is a 501(c) 3 tax-exempt entity designed to “promote research, education and public awareness” about the impacts of transportation investment. The Foundation supports an array of initiatives, including educational scholarships, awards, professional development academies, a transportation project safety certification program, roadway work zone safety and training, special economic reports and an exhibition on transportation at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

ARTBA Takes Legal Action on Maryland Purple Line Transit Project

Amicus Brief Cites Potential Negative Environmental & P3 Precedents

The American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) Aug. 23 told a federal appeals court that a lower court ruling blocking the Maryland Purple Line is an abuse of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and poses risks for the future of similar public-private partnerships (P3s) on transportation improvement projects.

The 16-mile Purple Line light-rail project between Bethesda and New Carrolton, Maryland, is one of the nation’s largest P3 transit projects.  While expected to secure $900 million in federal funding, the project has been mired in litigation since 2014 by anti-growth opponents.

In August 2016, a lower court halted construction saying the Federal Transit Administration failed to consider declining ridership on the Washington, D.C. Metro system.  Both the federal government and the state of Maryland appealed the decision contending that there was no obligation under NEPA to consider ridership on the Metro system.

In an amicus brief to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit, ARTBA said the lower court ruling could have negative impacts and set bad precedents on the environment and the ability of other states to move forward on P3s.  Such impacts, ARTBA warned, could jeopardize renewed bipartisan congressional focus on the nation’s infrastructure, which the association notes is “in disrepair and in desperate need of substantial upgrades.”  It could also undercut the efforts of the current Administration, like others before it, to improve the timeliness of the environmental review process, ARTBA said.

“If plaintiffs or courts can upend the culmination of the onerous NEPA process for economic or policy reasons having nothing to do with the environment, the ensuing uncertainty and delay would discourage public and private investment needed to rebuild and improve the country’s transportation infrastructure.  These concerns are particularly heightened for P3s, which are central to modern infrastructure financing and development,” the ARTBA brief argued.

Particularly for P3s, the ARTBA brief noted that the district court’s ruling “injects new delay and litigation risks, thereby stifling the growth of this key financing mechanism to leverage and combine governmental and private dollars and responsibilities to meet the nation’s exigent transportation needs.”  Specifically, the brief noted a single month of delay can increase a project’s costs by 1.5 percent – a significant amount for the more than $2 billion in construction costs associated with the Purple Line.

In asking for the district court ruling to be reversed, the association’s brief concluded: “The public and private parties engaged in Maryland’s Purple Line have expended many years, millions of dollars, and enormous energy into a legislated P3 that serves as a model for financing, building, and operating future transit projects nationwide. The desperately needed Purple Line is being challenged by a parochial few in Chevy Chase, the location of just one of the Purple Line’s 21 stations knitting together communities along 16 miles between Bethesda and New Carrollton. That obstruction and delay have been sustained by lower court rulings that completely misconstrue NEPA’s fundamental purpose and requirements.”

Submission of briefs in the case is expected to conclude Sept. 29.  No date has been set for oral arguments.

Read the full text of ARTBA’s legal brief (link).

Established in 1902, Washington, D.C.-based ARTBA represents the U.S. transportation construction industry before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, courts, news media and the general public.

State & Local Advocates Share Best Practices for Boosting Transportation Funding at Annual Workshop

More than 130 transportation design and construction professionals, chamber of commerce executives, and officials with better roads group and state transportation agencies from 36 states came together July 12 in the Nation’s Capital to share best practices for advancing transportation funding legislation and ballot initiatives during the 4th Annual National Workshop for State & Local Transportation Advocates.

The gathering was hosted by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s (ARTBA) Transportation Investment Advocacy Center™ (TIAC).  It featured a state legislator panel of transportation or finance committee members who discussed strategies and political challenges for funding roads, bridges and other infrastructure, including: Louisiana Rep. Kenneth Havard (R-District 62), Montana State Rep. Frank Garner (R-District 7), Oregon State Rep. Brad Witt (D-District 31) and Tennessee Senate Speaker Pro Tem Jim Tracy (R-District 16).

Anthony Attanasio, executive director of the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey; Michael Quigley, executive director of the California Alliance for Jobs; Dennis Faulkenberg, president of Appian, an Indiana-based advocacy group; and Jordon Marsh, vice president of South Carolina Alliance to Fix Our Roads, all highlighted how they were able to increase funding in their respective states.

Dr. Alison Premo Black, ARTBA’s chief economist, provided an overview of state legislative and ballot action over the past three years, including updates on the six states to pass gas tax increases in 2017, and lessons learned from past transportation funding increases.

In other sessions, panelists shared campaign strategies, tactics, messaging, opinion and economic research, legislative and ballot language, and “what’s worked and what hasn’t” in their state or local community in order to help other advocates meet their objectives.

The program also included the annual meeting of the “Transportation Investment Advocates Council™” – a national network of more than 70 construction and better roads professionals, chamber of commerce executives, and public officials who share an interest in building support for infrastructure investments locally.

TIAC, established in 2014, is an internet-based educational platform that features detailed reports, analyses and more than 50 case studies of recent transportation funding campaigns mounted in numerous states. It includes television, radio and print ads, polling, an overview of state and local funding and finance mechanisms, and an ongoing blog detailing new developments across the nation.

Learn more at www.transportationinvestment.org.

TIAC operations are supported by ARTBA’s “Transportation Makes America Work” program.