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TRIP REPORT CONFIRMS FINDINGS OF 2019 REPORT REQUESTED BY CONGRESS THAT FOUND MOST OF INTERSTATE SYSTEM NEEDS TO BE RECONSTRUCTED AND MODERNIZED

AGING U.S. INTERSTATE SYSTEM FACES INCREASED USAGE, MOUNTING CONGESTION AND DETERIORATING ROAD AND BRIDGE CONDITIONS; TRIP REPORT CONFIRMS FINDINGS OF 2019 REPORT REQUESTED BY CONGRESS THAT FOUND MOST OF INTERSTATE SYSTEM NEEDS TO BE RECONSTRUCTED AND MODERNIZED, REQUIRING MORE THAN A DOUBLING OF CURRENT FUNDING AND STRONG FEDERAL AND STATE LEADERSHIP

As the U.S. Interstate Highway System reaches 64 years old, it faces increasing congestion, unprecedented levels of travel – particularly by large trucks – and insufficient funding to make needed repairs and improvements. America’s most critical transportation link will need to be rebuilt and expanded to meet the nation’s growing transportation needs, according to a report released today by TRIP, a national transportation research nonprofit. The report, Restoring the Interstate Highway System: Meeting America’s Transportation Needs with a Reliable, Safe & Well-Maintained National Highway Networklooks at the Interstate system’s use, condition and benefits, and the findings of a 2019 report prepared by the Transportation Research Board (TRB),  at the request of Congress as part of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, on the condition and use of the Interstate system and on actions required to restore and upgrade the Interstate system.

The chart below ranks states whose Interstate systems are the most congested, have experienced the greatest increase in vehicle miles of travel (VMT) since 2000, carry the greatest share of commercial trucks, have the largest share of pavement in poor condition and bridges in poor/structurally deficient condition, and have the highest fatality rate. Data for all states can be found in the Appendix

According to the TRB report, the Interstate system has a persistent and growing backlog of physical and operational deficiencies as a result of age, heavy use and deferred reinvestment, and is in need of major reconstruction and modernization. The TRB report concludes that annual investment in the Interstate Highway System should be increased approximately two-and-a-half times, from $23 billion in 2018 to $57 billion annually over the next 20 years.

“The report released by TRIP confirms what American businesses experience every day—our Interstate highway system, which was once the envy of the world, is in serious need of modernization,” said Ed Mortimer, vice president of transportation infrastructure, U.S. Chamber of Commerce. “Commitment to modernization must be shared by federal, state and local leaders as well as the private sector. The Interstate system plays a key national role in economic success and quality of life for every American, and we continue to urge bipartisan solutions to address this critical issue. “

The TRIP report found that since 2000, travel on the Interstate system, the importance of which has been heightened during the COVID-19 pandemic, has increased at a rate nearly triple that at which new lane capacity is being added. As a result, 47 percent of urban Interstate highways are considered congested during peak hours. Travel by combination trucks on the Interstate increased 45 percent from 2000 to 2018, nearly double the 25 percent rate of travel growth for all vehicle travel during the same period.

“Carrying more than half of truck travel, the Interstate Highway System is critical to the nation’s supply chain. With $75 billion in cost added to freight transportation each year and 67 million tons of carbon dioxide from trucks released into the air due to highway congestion, the United States cannot afford to wait any longer to make the investments necessary to address systemic and growing problems stemming from decades of neglect,” said Chris Spear, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations. “It is past time for elected officials to provide sufficient and sustainable funding for Interstate highway improvements.”

The design of the Interstate – which includes a separation from other roads and rail lines, a minimum of four lanes, paved shoulders and median barriers – makes it more than twice as safe to travel on as all other roadways. The fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles of travel on the Interstate in 2018 was 0.58, compared to 1.32 on non-Interstate routes. TRIP estimates that additional safety features on the Interstate Highway System saved 5,930 lives in 2018. 

“A safe and well-maintained Interstate Highway System can strengthen America’s economy, enhance personal mobility and facilitate more efficient movement of goods, but the future of this network could be in jeopardy without increased federal investment,” said Kathleen Bower, AAA senior vice president of public affairs and international relations. “All states benefit from a modern, accessible Interstate Highway System. AAA urges Congress and the current administration to prioritize transportation investments to ensure safe, efficient and reliable mobility across the United States.”  

TRIP’s report finds that while pavement smoothness on most segments of the Interstate system is acceptable, the crumbling foundations of most highway segments need to be reconstructed, and that continued resurfacing rather than addressing underlying foundational issues provides diminishing returns and results in shorter periods of pavement smoothness.  

As the aging system’s foundations continue to deteriorate, most Interstate highways, bridges and interchanges will need to be rebuilt or replaced. According to the TRIP report, pavements on 11 percent of Interstate highways are in poor or mediocre condition. More than one quarter – 27 percent – of Interstate bridges are in need of repair or replacement. 

Restoring and upgrading the Interstate Highway System to meet the nation’s 21st Century transportation needs will require strong federal leadership and a robust federal-state partnership to reestablish the Interstate Highway System as the nation’s premier transportation network.  The current federal surface transportation program, Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST Act), the primary source of Interstate highway funding, expires on September 30, 2020, and the reauthorization of a new long-term, adequately and reliably funded long-term federal program will be needed to ensure that a strong federal program supports the restoration of the Interstate system.  

“With the expiration of the FAST Act rapidly approaching, this report reaffirms how critical it is for lawmakers to prioritize reauthorizing a long-term, fully funded federal highway program this year,” said Rod Schrader, chairman and CEO of Komatsu’s North American operations and chair of the Association of Equipment Manufacturers CE Sector. “Meeting the critical equipment and supply needs of essential industries including construction and agriculture requires a dependable, modernized national transportation network. Equipment manufacturers are working hard to keep these vital industries properly supplied in the midst of COVID-19 and we need lawmakers to do their part to support these essential supply chains now and for the long haul.” 

The ability of states to invest in Interstate highway repairs and improvements will be hampered by the tremendous decrease in vehicle travel that has occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is estimated to reduce state transportation revenues by at least 30 percent – approximately $50 billion – over the next 18 months.

Based on the findings of the TRB Interstate report, TRIP has provided a set of recommendations for the restoration of the Interstate Highway System, which includes:  the foundational reconstruction of Interstate highways, bridges and interchanges; improvement to roadway safety features; system right-sizing, including upgrading of some roadway corridors to Interstate standards; adding needed additional highway capacity on existing routes; adding additional corridors; and, modifying some urban segments to maintain connectivity while remediating economic and social disruption. 

“The long-term vision that helped establish the current Interstate system nearly 65 years ago is needed again today,” said Dave Kearby, TRIP’s executive director. “In order to rebuild the nation’s economy, maintain personal and commercial mobility, and improve quality of life, adequate transportation investment and a sustainable, long-term funding source for the federal surface transportation program must remain a priority.” 

Executive Summary

RESTORING THE INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM:Meeting America’s Transportation Needs with a Reliable, Safe & Well-Maintained National Highway Network 

 At sixty-four years old, an age at which many Americans are approaching Medicare eligibility and reduced workloads, the Interstate Highway System is deteriorating, its traffic load of cars and trucks continues to increase, and the system lacks an adequate long-term care plan. 

The Interstate Highway System remains the workhorse of the U.S. transportation system: heavily traveled and providing the most important link in the nation’s supply chain, and the primary connection between and within urban communities.  The importance of the Interstate Highway System and the reliable movement of goods it provides has been heightened during the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  But America’s Interstate highways are wearing out and showing signs of their advanced age, often heavily congested, and in need of significant reconstruction, modernization and expansion.

In 2015, as part of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, the U.S. Congress asked the Transportation Research Board (TRB), a division of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, to conduct a study to determine actions needed to upgrade and restore the Interstate Highway System to fulfill its role of safely and efficiently meeting the nation’s future critical personal, commercial and military travel needs. In 2019, the TRB provided Congress with a report that found that the nation’s Interstates are heavily congested and aging, with large portions of the system in need of major reconstruction and modernization. The report found that addressing the needs of the Interstate Highway System will require more than a doubling of current investment to adequately improve the system’s condition, reliability and safety, and that the restoration of the nation’s Interstate Highway System should be based on strong federal leadership of a collaborative effort with the states. 

TRIP’s Restoring the Interstate Highway System report provides the latest information on the Interstate system, including pavement conditions, bridge conditions, travel trends, traffic congestion levels, truck use, and traffic safety. It reviews the findings of the TRB Interstate report and concludes with recommended actions – based on the findings of the TRB report – to ensure that the system is able to meet the nation’s transportation needs. 

TRB INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM REPORT REQUESTED BY CONGRESS

In 2015, as part of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, the U.S. Congress requested a report evaluating the condition of the Interstate Highway System and providing recommendations on actions required to restore and upgrade the System to meet the growing and shifting transportation demands of the 21st Century. The report was conducted by the Transportation Research Board (TRB), a division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The findings of the TRB report, released in 2019, include:

  • The Interstate Highway System has a persistent and growing backlog of physical and operational deficiencies as a result of age, heavy use and deferred reinvestment, and is in need of major reconstruction and modernization.
  • Most roadway segments of the Interstate Highway System retain their original underlying foundations and need to be completely rebuilt from the subbase up.
  • The repeated resurfacing of Interstate highways is not addressing the deterioration of roadway subbases. Repeated resurfacing – rather than addressing underlying foundational issues – provides diminishing returns as additional resurfacing results in increasingly shorter periods of pavement smoothness and is likely to result in higher lifecycle costs than periodic reconstruction.
  • The modernization of the Interstate Highway System needs to include the following:  reconstruction of the majority of Interstate highways and bridges, including their foundations; the upgrade of most interchanges to improve their function and safety; the addition of capacity along existing corridors, the construction of new routes and the conversion of some existing routes to Interstate standards; the modification of some urban segments to maintain connectivity while remediating economic and social disruption; and, further improvement of highway safety features.  
  • To address the physical and operational deficiencies identified in the TRB report, annual investment in the Interstate Highway System should be increased by approximately two-and-a-half times, from its current level of $23 billion in 2018 to $57 billion annually over the next 20 years.
  • The restoration of the nation’s Interstate Highway System will require strong federal leadership and a robust federal-state partnership.

INTERSTATE USE AND CHARACTERISTICS

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, which has been called the most ambitious public works project built since the Roman Empire, is the most critical link in the nation’s transportation system.

  • The Interstate Highway System, which includes 2.6 percent of all roadway lane miles in the U.S., carries 26 percent of the nation’s vehicle travel.
  • Since funding of the Interstate system was approved in 1956 to 2018, annual vehicle miles of travel (VMT) in the U.S. increased by 418 percent, from 626 billion miles driven, to approximately 3.2 trillion miles driven.
  • From 1956 to 2018, the number of vehicles in the nation increased by 357 percent, from 65 million vehicles to 274 million vehicles. The nation’s population increased by 95 percent, from 168 million to 327 million during this time.

INTERSTATE HISTORY

The need for a transcontinental highway system in the U.S. was recognized as early as 1919, and an initial Interstate plan was completed in the late 1930s. But it was not until Congress approved a suitable funding mechanism in 1956 that the Interstate Highway System became a reality.

  • In 1919, Lieutenant Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in the U.S. Army’s first transcontinental motor convoy, from Washington, DC, to San Francisco, California.  The trip took 62 days, largely due to inadequate roads and highways.
  • In 1954, President Eisenhower appointed a committee to draft a proposal to fund a national system of Interstate Highways.  The initial proposal, subsequently dismissed by Congress, called for financing a national Interstate system through bond financing.
  • Nationwide construction of the Interstate Highway System began in 1956 following the approval of the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956.  Some segments of urban and regional highways built prior to 1956 were later incorporated into the Interstate Highway System.
  • The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, signed into law by President Dwight Eisenhower on June 29, 1956, called for the construction of a 41,000-mile system of Interstate highways.  The Act called for the Interstates to be paid for by taxes on motorists, such as the federal motor fuel tax, with the federal government paying 90 percent of the initial construction costs.  
  • The federal motor fuel tax was set at three cents-per-gallon in 1956 and is now 18.4 cents-per-gallon.
  • Revenue collected from the 18.4 cents-per-gallon federal motor fuel tax and the 24.4 cents-per-gallon federal diesel fuel tax are the primary sources of funding for the federal Highway Trust Fund, which distributes funds to state and local governments for highway and bridge repairs as well as other surface transportation improvements, including public transit, pedestrian and bicycling facilities.

INTERSTATE ROAD AND BRIDGE CONDITIONS

While pavement smoothness on most segments of the Interstate system is acceptable, approximately one quarter of Interstate bridges are in need of repair. As the aging system’s foundations continue to deteriorate, most Interstate highways, bridges and interchanges will need to be rebuilt or replaced.   

  • Pavements on 11 percent of Interstate highways are in poor or mediocre condition, with three percent rated in poor condition and eight percent rated in mediocre condition.  Another nine percent of Interstate pavements are in fair condition and the remaining 79 percent are in good condition.

The chart below shows the states with the greatest share of their Interstate highways with pavements in poor condition.  Data for all states can be found in the Appendix


  • An analysis of U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Bridge Inventory data indicates that more than one quarter  – 27 percent – of Interstate bridges (15,709 of  57,741) are in need of repair or replacement.   
  • Three percent of the nation’s Interstate bridges are rated in poor/structurally deficient condition, and 56 percent are rated in fair condition.  A bridge is rated in poor/structurally deficient condition if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.  
  • The chart below shows states with the greatest share of Interstate bridges rated poor/structurally deficient.  Data for all states can be found in the Appendix.
  • The intended lifespan of many of the nation’s Interstate bridges at the time of their construction is 50 years, though newer bridges are often built with longer-lasting materials and techniques that allow for a longer intended lifespan.  Older bridges often need significant repairs or rehabilitation or may need to be replaced to continue to provide adequate service.   
  • The average age of the nation’s Interstate bridges is 45 years. Fifty-four percent of the nation’s Interstate bridges are at least 50 years old. The chart below shows states with the largest share of Interstate bridges 50 years old or older. Data for all states can be found in the Appendix

INTERSTATE CONGESTION

Traffic congestion is increasing on the Interstate Highway System as the amount of vehicle travel far outstrips the capacity added to the system.  Nearly half of the length of the nation’s urban Interstates is congested. 

  • Forty-seven percent of the nation’s urban Interstate highways (8,914 of 19,160 miles) are considered congested because they carry traffic levels that result in significant delays during peak travel hours. The chart below shows the states with the greatest share of their urban Interstate highways considered congested. Data for all states can be found in the Appendix
  • The chart below shows the states with the greatest increase in vehicle miles of travel on their Interstate highways from 2000 to 2018. Data for all states can be found in the Appendix.
  • The chart below shows the states with the busiest urban Interstates, as measured by average daily traffic per lane mile. Data for all states can be found in the Appendix

INTERSTATE FATALITY RATES AND SAFETY

The Interstate Highway System provides a network of highways with a variety of safety designs that greatly reduce the likelihood of serious crashes. Travel on the nation’s Interstate highways is more than twice as safe as travel on all other roadways.

  • The Interstate Highway System, which carried 26 percent of the nation’s travel in 2018, accounted for only 13 percent of the nation’s traffic fatalities as a result of superior safety features.
  • The features that make Interstates safer than other roads include a separation from other roads and rail lines, a minimum of four-lanes, gentler curves, paved shoulders, median barriers, and rumble strips to warn drivers when they are leaving the roadway.
  • Travel on the nation’s Interstate highways is more than twice as safe as travel on all other roadways.  The fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles of travel on the Interstate system in 2018 was 0.58, compared to 1.32 on non-Interstate routes.
  • The chart below details states with the highest traffic fatality rates in 2018 on their Interstate highways and the fatality rate on all other roads in those states.  Data for all states can be found in the Appendix.
  • TRIP estimates that the Interstate Highway System saved 5,930 lives in 2018, based on an estimate of the number of additional fatalities that would have occurred had Interstate traffic been carried by other major roadways, which often have higher traffic fatality rates and may lack the safety features common to Interstate routes.  
  • Based on TRIP estimates, the chart below shows the states where the most lives were saved in 2018 due to the increased traffic safety provided by the Interstate Highway System.  Data for all states can be found in the Appendix.

INTERSTATE TRAVEL AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

The Interstate Highway System is the backbone of the nation’s economy and has played a critical role in improving the country’s business productivity.  Since 2000, the amount of combination truck travel on Interstates has increased at a rate nearly double the rate of total travel on the system.     

  • The Interstate system carried 53 percent of all large commercial truck travel in the U.S. in 2018.  
  • Travel by combination trucks on the Interstate Highway System increased 45 percent from 2000 to 2018, nearly double the 25 percent rate of growth for all vehicle travel during the same period. 
  • Travel by combination trucks, which are the large trucks that carry the majority of freight shipped in the U.S., accounted for 11 percent of all vehicle miles of travel on the Interstate Highway System in 2018.   
  • The chart below shoes the states with the greatest share of Interstate vehicle travel by combination trucks. Data for all states can be found in the Appendix.
  • Every year, $16.8 trillion in goods are shipped from sites in the U.S. 
  • Seventy-two percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in the U.S. are carried by trucks and another 14 percent are carried by courier services, which use trucks for part of the deliveries.  
  • The completion of the vast majority of the Interstate system by the 1980s, and the deregulation of the U.S. trucking industry, resulted in a significant improvement in the competitiveness of U.S. business.  The cost of moving freight, as measured by U.S. business logistics costs, dropped from 16 percent of U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 1980 to eight percent in 2018.
  • The TRB report found that U.S. counties either on an Interstate highway or within 20 miles of an Interstate are anticipated to grow in population through 2060 at a rate approximately seven times greater than counties that are at least 20 miles from an Interstate highway (36 percent versus five percent).   
  • The Interstate Highway System has reduced travel times between destinations throughout the U.S. The improved mobility provided by the Interstate Highway System has given Americans greater choices about where they live, work, shop and spend their leisure time.
  • Forty-nine of the 50 top truck bottlenecks identified by the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) in its 2020 annual list of the nation’s top 100 truck bottlenecks are on Interstate Highways. The top 20 truck bottlenecks are listed below, with all 50 included in the Appendix

INTERSTATE FUNDING CHALLENGES

The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) has determined that the nation faces a significant backlog in needed Interstate highway repairs and improvements.

  • The current backlog of needed improvements on the nation’s Interstate Highway System is estimated by the USDOT to be $123 billion.
  • The backlog on the nation’s Interstate Highway System includes $54 billion needed to improve pavement conditions, $37 billion to improve bridges and $33 billion for needed system expansion and enhancement.
  • The ability of states to invest in Interstate highway repairs and improvements may be hampered by the tremendous decrease in vehicle travel that has occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials estimates will reduce state transportation revenues by at least 30 percent – approximately $50 billion – over the next 18 months.

The primary source of revenue for the Interstate Highway System is the federal surface transportation program, which expires on September 30, 2020. The program does not have a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • Signed into law in December 2015, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST Act), provides modest increases in federal highway and transit spending, allows states greater long-term funding certainty and streamlines the federal project approval process.  
  • Revenue collected from the 18.4 cents-per-gallon federal motor fuel tax and the 24.4 cents-per-gallon federal diesel fuel tax are the primary sources of funding for the federal Highway Trust Fund, which distributes funds to state and local governments for highway and bridge repairs and other surface transportation improvements, including public transit, pedestrian and bicycling facilities.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESTORING THE INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM

The restoration and upgrading of the Interstate Highway System to meet 21st Century transportation needs will require strong federal leadership and a robust federal-state partnership to reestablish the Interstate Highway System as the nation’s premier transportation network.  The TRB Interstate report notes that “the scale and scope of the Interstate reinvestment imperative is daunting.” 

  • The following recommendations, based on the findings and recommendations of the TRB Interstate report, provide a roadmap for the restoration of the Interstate Highway System:
  • Reconstruct the nation’s Interstate Highway System, including pavements, bridges and interchanges
  •  Improve safety features on Interstate highways
  • Right-size the Interstate Highway System by: 
  • upgrading some existing roadways to Interstate standard 
  • adding needed additional highway capacity on existing routes to maintain and improve mobility
  • adding additional corridors to accommodate demographic and economic growth 
  • modifying some urban segments to maintain connectivity while remediating economic and social disruption

All data used in this report is the most current available. Sources of information for this report include:  The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the Transportation Research Board (TRB), and the U.S. Census Bureau. Cover photo credit: Yaroslav Sabitov.

For the full report visit TRIPnet.org

House Committee Approves Multi-Year Transportation Bill

By Lauren Schapker, vice president of legislative affairs, ARTBA

The House Transportation & Infrastructure (T&I) Committee June 18 approved in a party-line vote legislation to reauthorize the nation’s surface transportation programs.

The Investing in a New Vision for the Environment & Surface Transportation (INVEST) in America Act would authorize $494 billion over five years, including $309 billion for highways (a 42 percent increase over current levels) and $105 billion (72 percent increase) for the public transit program.

T&I Committee Chairman Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) said the bill “is exactly the kind of investment we need to create jobs and help our economy recover from the current pandemic.”

The measure emphasizes “state of good repair” and “fix-It-first” approaches, rather than new construction. It creates several new discretionary grant programs and adds programs to address resilience and climate change. 

ARTBA’s government relations team has compiled a comprehensive 10-page analysis that provides more details about key provisions in the 928-page bill.

The bill was drafted without Republican input. In response, the party’s T&I Committee members released their own legislation, the Surface Transportation Advanced through Reform, Technology & Efficient Review (STARTER) Act. The plan proposed a narrower view of surface transportation needs, maintaining existing funding levels, and adding policies to streamline operations and provide states with more flexibility. It was defeated on a party-line vote.

T&I Committee Ranking Member Sam Graves (R-Mo.) lamented the lack of bipartisanship he said had been present for the past five federal surface transportation laws. 

“Ultimately, this bill is a costly, seismic shift in our transportation programs, at an incredibly uncertain time when no one knows whether COVID-19 will alter the way people get around,” Graves said. He also criticized the measure for not being paid for and noted “…to pay for it with the gas tax, we’d have to double it at a time when so many Americans are struggling to make ends meet because of the pandemic.”

Bill Amendments

Nearly 200 amendments were considered during the marathon two-day markup. ARTBA sent a five-page letter to all committee members sharing the industry’s views on 36 of them.  The association’s government affairs team also engaged committee members and staff throughout the deliberations on a wide variety of amendments that would directly impact the construction market, including “Hours of Service, “local hire” preferences, and “Buy America” rules.

Among the notable adopted amendments: 

  • Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio): Repealing “fiscal constraint” requirements, an ARTBA priority, which would allow better long-term planning by state departments of transportation.
  • Rep. John Garamendi (D-Calif.): Allowing states to conduct their own environmental reviews, as opposed to under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).
  • Rep. Rick Crawford (R-Ark.): Prioritizing COVID-19 support for testing and prevention for critical transportation personnel.

The full House is expected to consider the bill the week of June 29.  It will likely be incorporated into a broader Democratic infrastructure package— the “Moving Forward Act,” which includes water, broadband, school construction and other infrastructure investments.

For more detailed information please click on the following links

ARTBA President Dave Bauer’s Statement

ARTBA’s Detailed Bill Analysis

First-of-its-Kind Dashboard Tool Highlights Benefits of Federal Highway Investment

National and state-by-state data available: artbahighwaydashboard.org
States leveraged $31 billion in federal funds to advance $66.5 billion in highway improvements during fiscal year (FY) 2018, according to an interactive tool that for the first time provides the American public and elected officials a clear look at how and where each state invests its transportation tax dollars.
 
Obtained through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s (ARTBA) analysis of Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) data displays information on more than 24,000 projects that moved forward in FY 2018.
 
“This dashboard helps shift the conversation about federal highway investments from apportionment tables and obligation charts to specific outcomes and benefits,” ARTBA President Dave Bauer says.  “Such transparency and accountability will help the American people better understand the value they are getting from infrastructure investments.” 
 
Nationally, nearly half of the projects—45 percent—were for repair or reconstruction work on existing highways in FY 2018, according to ARTBA’s Highway Dashboard: A 50-State Guide to the Benefits of Federal Investment.” Adding capacity (22 percent of funds), planning, design and construction engineering (14 percent), new construction (4 percent), planning, environmental, research and administration (2 percent), bike and pedestrian facilities (2 percent), debt service (2 percent) and utilities (1 percent), are among the other featured categories.
 
The dashboard allows users to visualize how each state deployed federal funds in a given year and features the top projects dating back to 1950.

The ARTBA Highway Dashboard was compiled by the association’s chief economist, Dr. Alison Premo Black.  The data is submitted by states as part of FHWA’s Fiscal Management Information System (FMIS).  

Established in 1902 and with more than 8,000 public and private sector members, the Washington, D.C.-based ARTBA advocates for strong investment in transportation infrastructure to meet the public and business community demand for safe and efficient travel.

Learn more: artbahighwaydashboard.org.

ARTBA Chairman Steve McGough Oral Testimony, Senate EPW Committee Hearing June 4, 2020

Chairman Barrasso, Senator Carper and other members of the Committee, thank you for holding today’s hearing about the role federal infrastructure investment can and should play in the economic recovery.  

I’m 2020 ARTBA Chairman Steve McGough, president and C-F-O of Houston based HCSFederalS—a national company that provides technology solutions to help improve construction company business operations.

Let me begin by emphasizing  two points.

First, shovel-ready projects are not a solution to the nation’s current economic challenges.  

While transportation infrastructure improvements have positive job and salary impacts, the real value comes from putting in place long-term assets that increase the efficiency and productivity for the entire economy.

According to the Federal Highway Administration, goods movement over the nation’s highways account for 73 percent of the value of domestic freight.  

Industries like wholesale and retail trade and manufacturing are two of the largest users of transportation services in the economy and utilize highway freight shipments for 58 to 65 percent of their needs.  

Second, federal highway investment is a major contributor to each of your states’ infrastructure networks, but it is effectively a silent partner.  We’ve developed a way to correct that shortcoming.

In 2018 alone, states utilized nearly 31 billion dollars of federal highway funds to begin construction activity on over 24 thousand highway improvement projects with a total value of 66 point 7 billion dollars.  

Thanks to the new interactive ARTBA Highway Dashboard, policymakers and the public alike can see how federal highway resources were deployed by each state in a given year dating back to 1950.  

We have compiled each state’s top-10 federal-aid projects, the total number of projects and the type of improvements advanced that year.

The Dashboard uses data from the Federal Highway Administration to shift the conversation about federal highway investments from apportionment tables and obligation charts to outcomes and benefits.

Mr. Chairman, the federal highway program is widely regarded as one of the most meaningful and popular of all federal discretionary spending activities.  Now, we can articulate why.

As an example, Wyoming in 2018 used 309 million dollars in federal highway funds to advance 262 projects with a total value of 370 million dollars.  The largest single recipient of these funds was a 20 million-dollar resurfacing project in Sweetwater County.  

Of the federal aid projects Wyoming moved forward with that year, 66 percent were for reconstruction and repair work.

This information not only demonstrates the value each state receives from highway investment, but also highlights  the potential numerous benefits  from the five-year reauthorization proposal this committee approved last July.  

         America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act would increase highway investment by 27 percent over the next five years.  Your proposal includes commonsense policy reforms that will expedite the delivery of needed infrastructure improvements and maximize the impact of federal resources.  More importantly, the bill’s investment growth stands in stark contrast to the purchasing power focus -of the past 15 years.

         We have given each of you a snapshot of how your state benefited from federal highway investment in 2018.  Imagine what this program could accomplish with the resources you have proposed.

         Mister Chairman, the recent forecast from the Congressional Budget Office that it could take a decade for the U.S. economy to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic is sobering.  

This outlook is also disturbing in the context of the nation’s infrastructure deficit.  State and local highway spending needed eight years, or until 2015, to return to pre-Great Recession levels, while G-D-P recovery occurred in three years. 

That lag in highway and bridge improvement activity could illustrate the challenging road ahead  for our infrastructure network absent proactive action, such as enactment of the America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act.

Your proposal is both a robust highway program reauthorization AND a foundational opportunity for economic recovery and growth.

         Mister Chairman, the transportation construction industry is not here today asking for federal relief.   Instead, we seek to be part of the solution to spur the meaningful economic recovery the nation desperately needs.  

We urge the other Senate committees with respective jurisdiction over their portions of the transportation programs to act quickly in order to facilitate final passage of America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act.

         Thank you for convening today’s hearing and I look forward to your questions.

For more information visit www.artba.org

Multi-Year Highway & Transit Bill an Elixir for Ailing U.S. Economy, ARTBA Chairman Tells Senate Committee

A long-term federal transportation infrastructure investment bill will help drive the nation’s economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) Chairman Steve McGough said in June 4 testimony before the Senate Environment & Public Works (EPW) Committee.

McGough, the president and chief financial officer of HCSS, a Houston-based national construction software company, said a recent forecast from the Congressional Budget Office that it could take a decade for the U.S. economy to recover from the coronavirus was sobering.  

McGough added one-time infusions of federal transportation investment and shovel-ready projects were not the solutions to America’s unprecedented economic challenges.

“While transportation infrastructure improvements have positive job and salary impacts, the real value comes from putting in place long-term assets that increase the efficiency and productivity for the entire economy,” McGough said.

McGough voiced the association’s support for the EPW Committee’s July 2019 unanimously approved America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act (ATIA), a proposal to increase highway investment by 27 percent over the next five years.  ATIA also includes positive reforms to expedite the delivery of needed infrastructure improvements and maximize the impacts of federal resources. 

During his testimony, the ARTBA chairman announced the creation of a new ARTBA Highway Dashboard: A 50-State Guide to the Benefits of Federal Investment,” an interactive tool that highlights the program’s outcomes at the national and state levels.  Using Federal Highway Administration data, it features each state’s top-10 federal-aid projects, the total number of projects and the type of improvements advanced in a given year.

ARTBA says the dashboard will increase transparency and better highlight what could be achieved with a robust, multi-year surface transportation reauthorization bill.

McGough concluded: “We urge the other Senate committees with respective jurisdiction over their portions of the transportation programs to act quickly in order to facilitate final passage of America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act.”

Established in 1902 and with more than 8,000 public and private sector members, the Washington, D.C.-based ARTBA advocates for strong investment in transportation infrastructure to meet the public and business community demand for safe and efficient travel.