Tag Archive for 'Construction and Operation Plan (COP)'

Tom Ewing’s Environmental Update

*  Price points.  French gas prices during the Yellow Vest chaos were about $1.53/liter on the day I checked; a US equivalent of $5.78/gallon.  Gas in my area dropped to $1.98/gallon, about 52¢/liter.  Around the same time, Yahoo! News reported that an Exxon, Hess, and NCOOC off-shore exploration project confirmed the discovery of 5 billion barrels of recoverable oil, with exploration continuing.  Estimated recovery cost: $35/barrel (in the ocean!).  In other words, cheap oil, just about forever.  I like how Hamlet said it: “There are more hydrocarbons recoverable on Earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”  Value is frequently judged by how much people will pay for something, and then they won’t.  Value is hard to assess with grand, singular cultural creations and monuments; you know, maybe like what’s the value of the Arc de Triomphe, damaged during the French protests?  Now it’s clear: The treasures of France are not worth $5.78/gallon.  If gas costs less, they stay.  If it costs more, the Arc and all that old stuff va être brûlé au sol!
*  On Friday, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) announced the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for “the Construction and Operation Plan (COP) submitted by Vineyard Wind LLC (Vineyard Wind).” The Draft analyzes potential environmental impacts of the proposed Vineyard Wind project and reasonable alternatives. The Notice starts the public review and comment period and it presents the dates and locations of public hearings.  The project would install up to 100 wind turbine generators, each with a capacity of between 8 and 10 MW in an area approximately 12 nautical miles from the southeast corner of Martha’s Vineyard and a similar distance from the southwest side of Nantucket.  The comment period ends January 22, 2019.
*  Update: I asked the MA’s Governor’s office about The Commission on the Future of Transportation in the Commonwealth Report, noted last week to be late; it was due by December 1.  “No specific date can be conveyed today,” a staff person wrote back, “please feel free to check back with me next week.”  This really isn’t about one more state transportation report.  I mean, you could rebuild the Taj Mahal with state transportation reports printed and filed over the last decades.  There are two bigger issues: one, missed deadlines devalue the work.  “It’s just not that important” is the signal from the top, about issues supposedly undertaken in the public’s interest.  Second, although apparently not likely with this work, what about the people who need the report so they can make next-step decisions?  Isn’t their time worth anything?  A web page note would be thoughtful, e.g., “Sorry, the report’s delayed!  Late comments deserve a careful review!  Thanks for understanding!”  The message now? “Get over it, peons, you’re just so not worth it.”
Tom Ewing
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