Tag Archive for 'construction equiment'

AEM Discusses 5 Ways Leaders Can Motivate and Inspire Remote Teams

By Judy Gaus, AEM Vice President of Human Resources and Operations

The sudden onset of remote work has impacted companies and organizations across the United States and around the world.

It happened almost overnight. The COVID-19 pandemic led business offices to close their doors and employees to find a way to conduct their work from home. We all went from congregating in meeting spaces and around cubicles to interacting “face to face” via our computer screens. For the past few months, we’ve found ourselves catching glimpses of each other’s homes, hearing dogs barks, and listening to children yell and laugh during video conferences. While we’ve never been farther apart from our colleagues, it’s nice to know it doesn’t always have to feel that way.

Now as the U.S. opens up and some offices begin to welcome back employees into their facilities, we know some members of the workforce will continue to remain remote for the time being. With that fact in mind, AEM wanted to share 5 useful and common-sense ways in which business leaders can motivate remote teams and help them keep pace with organizational demands and goals:

1. CHECK IN FREQUENTLY.

Whether it comes in the form of asking a quick question, clarifying a detail, or soliciting feedback on an idea, find a reason to reach out to your team members. Not all that long ago, it was so easy to simply swing by a colleague’s workstation and have a quick conversation. Now, with so many people working remotely, doing so requires being more intentional. And while technology certainly helps to facilitate communication while working remotely, it’s only useful if you’re willing to set aside a few minutes for video chat “face time” with one or more of your teammates.

While it can easy to feel like you may be intruding or imposing on others, you’re really not. And, by checking in more frequently, you’ll eventually become more comfortable and convey a message that regular interactions should continue to take place.

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2. HAVE FUN!

Making an effort to socialize and have fun with your team is critically important to establishing stronger inter-office relationships. For example, my team and I get together on video chat every other week over the lunch for about 30-45 minutes. We catch up with one another, take a break from our work, and talk about a favorite book we’ve read or a movie we’ve recently seen.

Ultimately, engaging your teammates and facilitating a bit of fun helps promotes a sense of belonging and community – something that’s incredibly important during these uncertain times.

In addition, AEM recently held an all-staff online meeting where we asked everyone to wear a crazy hat and we randomly selected individuals to share their favorite quarantine memory. This 30-minute meeting exclusively focused on fun and sharing personal stories. It was a great way to connect on a personal level without having any business on the agenda, and feedback has been very positive.

3. BE FLEXIBLE AND HUMAN.

The “traditional” workday is traditional no more, and flexibility is everything these days. As a leader, you need to know that your team members have a lot going on in their lives right now. Some may not be able to work the typical 8 a.m.-4 p.m. or 9 a.m.-5 p.m. schedule, and they need to know they can stop and address certain situations as they arise at home.

Few things will motivate your team members more than having a flexible boss who trusts them to manage their days effectively. Let them take care of their personal business, as they will likely go out of their way to re-engage later in the evening or early the next morning.

4. REINFORCE THE VALUE OF TEAM ROLES.

With how everything has unfolded over the course of the past few months, it’s no secret that priorities within organizations are constantly changing with time. Organizational pivots are stressful experiences, and they can cause quite a bit of anxiety and uncertainty among employees.

If you’re a leader, one of your top priorities right now should be maintaining communications with the members of your team. Let them know if their roles are changing, and be sure to convey how their positions fit into the organization’s “bigger picture.” They’ll appreciate the fact that they are continuing to add value, even if comes in a different form than it did in the past.

5. PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEADERSHIP.

There’s no better time than right now to encourage your team members to step up, expand their skill sets and take advantage of available training opportunities. Let your employees be leaders, and allow them to come forward and let you know how they want to get involved.

As an established leader, you need to be flexible. Lead with empathy and understanding, and be sure to set your employees up to be motivated and productive by ensuring they have the support, tools and resources they need to become leaders themselves and – ultimately – bring greater value to your organization.  

Hyundai to Develop Hydrogen-fueled Excavators, Forklifts

Expects to Introduce Machines to the Market as soon as 2023

 Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas today announced that its parent company, Hyundai Construction Equipment, recently entered into an agreement with Hyundai Motors and Hyundai Mobis to develop hydrogen-fueled excavators and forklifts, with development starting this year and plans to roll out the technology as soon as 2023.

The three companies will collaborate on the technology at Hyundai’s Mabuk Research Center in Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea. According to the Memorandum of Understanding signed by all parties, Hyundai Motors and Hyundai Mobis will design and manufacture hydrogen fuel cell systems, including power packs, while Hyundai Construction Equipment will design, manufacture and evaluate the performance of the excavators and forklifts incorporating the technology.

Unlike conventional diesel-engine-based equipment, hydrogen-based electric construction equipment uses electricity produced through the chemical reactions between hydrogen and oxygen as its power source, which means there are no toxic emissions polluting the air. In addition, compared with lithium-battery-powered electric machines, hydrogen fuel cells are especially compatible with the power demands associated with large construction equipment because it is easier to expand the capacity of hydrogen fuel cells.

Agreement lays foundation for commercialization of hydrogen-powered equipment

Hwang Jong-hyun, head of the R&D Division for Hyundai Construction Equipment and Hyundai Material Handling, said, “With this latest agreement, we’ve prepared a foundation upon which we can secure core technology in hydrogen-powered construction equipment ahead of our competitors. Hyundai Construction Equipment will do its very best to meet the challenges that lie ahead as countries around the world attempt to establish global standard for certifying the performance of equipment and legislating relevant laws for the commercialization of hydrogen-powered construction equipment, and play a leading role in the market moving forward.”

Stan Park, vice president, Distribution and Marketing, Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas, said, “Being part of the Hyundai team that will lead the future of hydrogen-powered equipment globally is a great honor. We look forward to introducing this important forward-looking technology to customers across North America who are interested in clean, alternative fuel sources.”

About Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas

Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas, Inc., Norcross, Ga., offers a full line of crawler excavators, ranging from compact models to mass excavators, as well as wheeled excavators, wheel loaders, compaction equipment, hydraulic breakers and forklifts. Visitwww.hceamericas.com for more information or to locate a Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas dealer.  

 today announced that its parent company, Hyundai Construction Equipment, recently entered into an agreement with Hyundai Motors and Hyundai Mobis to develop hydrogen-fueled excavators and forklifts, with development starting this year and plans to roll out the technology as soon as 2023.

The three companies will collaborate on the technology at Hyundai’s Mabuk Research Center in Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea. According to the Memorandum of Understanding signed by all parties, Hyundai Motors and Hyundai Mobis will design and manufacture hydrogen fuel cell systems, including power packs, while Hyundai Construction Equipment will design, manufacture and evaluate the performance of the excavators and forklifts incorporating the technology.

Unlike conventional diesel-engine-based equipment, hydrogen-based electric construction equipment uses electricity produced through the chemical reactions between hydrogen and oxygen as its power source, which means there are no toxic emissions polluting the air. In addition, compared with lithium-battery-powered electric machines, hydrogen fuel cells are especially compatible with the power demands associated with large construction equipment because it is easier to expand the capacity of hydrogen fuel cells.

Agreement lays foundation for commercialization of hydrogen-powered equipment

Hwang Jong-hyun, head of the R&D Division for Hyundai Construction Equipment and Hyundai Material Handling, said, “With this latest agreement, we’ve prepared a foundation upon which we can secure core technology in hydrogen-powered construction equipment ahead of our competitors. Hyundai Construction Equipment will do its very best to meet the challenges that lie ahead as countries around the world attempt to establish global standard for certifying the performance of equipment and legislating relevant laws for the commercialization of hydrogen-powered construction equipment, and play a leading role in the market moving forward.”

Stan Park, vice president, Distribution and Marketing, Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas, said, “Being part of the Hyundai team that will lead the future of hydrogen-powered equipment globally is a great honor. We look forward to introducing this important forward-looking technology to customers across North America who are interested in clean, alternative fuel sources.”

About Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas

Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas, Inc., Norcross, Ga., offers a full line of crawler excavators, ranging from compact models to mass excavators, as well as wheeled excavators, wheel loaders, compaction equipment, hydraulic breakers and forklifts. Visit www.hceamericas.com for more information or to locate a Hyundai Construction Equipment Americas dealer.  

For additional articles on hydrogen fueled/powered, etc. type Hydrogen in the search box at the top of the page.

The Ride to Success

Catom Trucking Grows Business Through Strong Partnership

From serving a few surrounding counties to spanning the entire Midwest, Catom Trucking has grown significantly over the years. But it isn’t catchy advertising or feet-on-the pavement sales efforts the construction and aggregates equipment hauling company credits for its success; they believe their customers led the way. 

Catom Trucking is able to fulfill unique customer needs with the help of Talbert Manufacturing and its comprehensive design process. (Photo Courtesy of Catom Trucking)

As the opportunity for construction projects increased year after year, contractors took the wheel, driving business and expanding into new territories. And when contractors needed dependable equipment hauling, Catom sat shotgun for the ride to help navigate the road to success. 

A Strong Start

Catom Trucking started in 1979 as a modest family owned and operated trucking company in Chicago. Tom and CathyStellman, Owners, recall the early days when they named the company by merging their two first names together. 

“We started out of our home with one truck and dump trailer hauling sand, gravel and asphalt,” said Tom. “We also leased one lowboy to pick up pavement equipment in the early mornings and evenings. It was a pretty simple operation.”

Many of Catom’s customers were earthmoving, roadbuilding and sewer contractors who relied on the company for getting their large equipment to and from jobsites. Catom was called upon by its ever-increasing customer base to haul everything from trenchers to excavators.

By 1995, the number and size of contracting companies Catom served grew to 25. Catom itself had grown, as well, to keep up with demand, running five trucks and 10 trailers. Up until this point, the trucking company was able to get by with “off-the-shelf” heavy-haul type trailers, but the size of equipment its clients needed hauled continued to increase and finally reached the company’s breaking point.

“Off-the-shelf” heavy-haul type trailers allowed Catom Trucking to get by in the early days of the business, but as clients’ equipment grew, so did the need for a custom solution. That’s when the company turned to Talbert Manufacturing for a solution.  (Photo Courtesy of Catom Trucking)
 

“For the first time, our customers were using 100,000-pound excavators, some of the heaviest at the time,” Tom said.

It was a logistical challenge not only for traveling through Illinois, but also across borders into other Midwestern states, where lower bridges and a multi-axle setups could be required. 

“We simply didn’t have a cost-effective way to haul the excavators in one load. The equipment would have needed to be disassembled and loaded onto multiple trailers, which was time consuming and more costly for our clients. Loading disassembled equipment also raised the risk of injuries. We knew it was time to look at a customized trailer.”

Catom needed a heavy-haul trailer that didn’t just serve the immediate need, but also could be used to haul a variety of other equipment, such as locomotives, and travel through multiple states. They knew this would minimize costs and prove to be more efficient not only for the business, but also their customers, as well. Plus, Cathy and Tom knew a trailer with the flexibility to haul a wide range of equipment would result in a strong ROI. 

Keeping Up with Demand

“We needed to grow as a company so we could grow with our customers and keep up with their demands, so we looked at what our biggest competitors were doing,” Cathy said. 

They noticed many of their competitors were running Talbert trailers. Catom already owned several standard Talbert units.

Catom Trucking owns and operates 30 custom Talbert trailers – 43 percent of its entire trailer fleet. The trailers help the company not only meet the needs of its current customers, but are designed to serve future customers as well. (Photo Courtesy of Catom Trucking)

Not only did Catom need to meet the needs of its current customers, but the company also had to ensure that whatever trailer they purchased could serve future customers. This included considering deck inserts and axle count and configurations. Because Catom had several other Talbert trailers in its fleet already, many of the components that would give them that flexibility were readily available; what one trailer needed for a specific load requirement could be pulled from another. 

The Talbert team met with Catom and its employees to discuss details. The criteria: 100,000-pound capacity trailer, achievable with multiple deck and axle configurations. 

Four months later, Catom’s first custom trailer was delivered: a six-axle raised rail trailer with a removable deck section. The design allowed Catom to install a beam insert or deck extension for longer, heavier equipment. Talbert also designed the trailer to go from six axles to seven or eight axles, which minimized the number of permits needed for traveling through other Midwestern states.

“We know Talbert trailers are built with high-quality, heavy-duty components,” Cathy said. “Having that along with specific features that are customized for our needs took our operation to another level.”

Catom could finally move some of the biggest pieces of equipment at the time in one load, which, as they predicted, saved time, hassle and money. Potential customers also took notice of Catom’s new capability, quickly moving them to the head of the pack of preferred companies.

“We started to receive opportunities to bid bigger projects,” Tom said. “Less than a year later, we needed a second custom Talbert trailer to keep up.”

The trailer may have been Catom’s second custom unit, but it was the company’s first 11-axle trailer. It also had a removable deck, jeep and stinger, which allowed heavier loads to be distributed more evenly. 


“That’s when we really thought we were going to town,” Tom said. “We were getting more and more big jobs because we were one of the few hauling companies that could accommodate the larger equipment, and having the two custom trailers really allowed us to serve these contractors quickly.”

Each trailer was basically several units in one. For example, Catom could install a beam insert onto the 11-axle trailer to haul a large excavator, then put in the flush deck and take off axles for moving a crusher or forklift. Catom could serve a wide range of clients with the custom trailers, which made for a healthy return on investment while providing a service that was ahead of the local competition. 

“We started using our Talbert custom trailers from day one and each unit has quickly paid for itself.”  

Built to Suit

Catom now owns and operates 30 custom Talbert trailers – 43 percent of its entire trailer fleet. This includes multiple lowboys ranging from 40-ton, 2-axle to 65-ton, 13-axle trailers as well as 40-ton Double Drop stretch trailers and sliding-axle tilt-bed trailers used for hauling smaller equipment. The latest model Talbert delivered, in July 2017, was a 13-axle unit custom designed to transport much heavier equipment than ever before. 

“Every inch of that trailer is built to our specs. We simply gave them the serial number of the Talbert trailer we wanted it compatible with, then sat down with their team to discuss details,” Tom said. “The process is like no other. Catom gets engineering, parts, quality control and sales all in one room so they really understand what we need – and what our customers need.” 

As equipment grew larger and became heavier over the years, the demand for trailers that could handle the equipment in one load increased dramatically. That’s when Tom and Cathy Stellman saw their modest trucking company experience significant growth and success, which they attribute to hard work and valuable partnerships.  (Photo Courtesy of Catom Trucking)

Catom isn’t about just making its customers happy, but its employees, as well. Stellman has “been in the trenches,” so to speak, and is familiar with what works. The company often looks to its drivers, too, for insight about what makes operations easier. 

“When we order Talbert trailers, we know what we are getting,” Cathy said. “If we need a 60-ton unit, we get a 60-ton unit, not a 60-ton-rated trailer that can’t really handle the load because of a weak neck. That’s one of the most impressive things about the Talbert trailers – the geometry of their goosenecks.”

Talbert pioneered the industry’s first mechanical removable gooseneck in 1947 and the first hydraulic removable gooseneck in 1962. The innovations revolutionized how equipment was loaded and hauled, making what was once time consuming and dangerous, quick and safe.

“What makes Catom successful? Plain and simple: When our customers have a need, we fulfill it and we fulfill it well,” Cathy said. “But, it couldn’t be done without suppliers like Talbert who mirror those same values. Any time our customers come to us with a special request, we’re meeting with Talbert to get it done.”

The road to success is never straight and can be sometimes difficult to navigate. But what makes that road to success achievable are the partners who are in it from start to finish. For Catom Trucking and its customers, that partner has been and still is Talbert Manufacturing.  

That partnership, coupled with hard work, keeps Catom Trucking growing both in terms of fleet and family ownership. Tina Stellman, Tom and Cathy’s daughter, has also contributed to the company’s growth since 1997 and shares with her parents the same passion for fulfilling customers’ needs. 

“We feel strongly about maintaining a family owned and operated business,” Cathy said. “As I step back from the business, I look forward to Tina continuing the great relationships, passion and customer commitment that has made Catom what it is today.”