Tag Archive for 'construction equipment'

Liebherr to Celebrate 50th Anniversary in the US

Liebherr in the United States is celebrating 50 years of success as a leading manufacturer in North America this year. 

With its 50th anniversary theme “United by Success,” the manufacturer remains focused on its commitment to U.S. customers. 

Liebherr has been producing in the U.S. since 1970. The company is one of the leading North American suppliers of construction machinery and other technically advanced, user-oriented products and services. The manufacturer sells and distributes products throughout its own locations and through an independent distribution network.

Liebherr has built its U.S. business on a foundation of trust, innovation and engagement with customers. Five decades later, Liebherr’s growth, diversity, and stability are evidence of how the company is united by success with customers as they work on the challenges of tomorrow and focus on the future together. 

Celebrating Together

Throughout 2020, Liebherr will focus on 10 innovative product divisions across the U.S. in addition to its commitment to the success of customers, business partners and employees.

“The ‘United by Success’ campaign shows that our customers and our company are one through each other’s successes and are stronger together,” said Torben Reher, Managing Director of Liebherr USA, Co. 

Plans for 2020 include Liebherr completing the expansion of its Newport News, Virginia, campus, introducing new technologies and equipment, and having a major presence with customers during industry trade shows.

The anniversary campaign will engage with customers on web, social media, and industry events, including a dedicated U.S. anniversary landing page and video. Liebherr will also unveil special anniversary exhibits and host VIP events to thank customers for their loyalty throughout the last five decades. 

The exhibits and VIP events will be held at CONEXPO-CON/AGG (Las Vegas, March 10-14) and MINExpo (Las Vegas, September 28-October 1).

Expanding into the Future

DCIM\100MEDIA\DJI_0412.JPG

To keep pace with its growth, a new $60 million state of the art expansion will be completed in spring 2020 in Newport News, which will be home to Liebherr USA, Co. The new site is adjacent to the company’s current facilities, where Liebherr has operated for its first 50 years. The new buildings will add more than 251,000 square feet to the existing 560,000-square-foot campus. Additionally, Liebherr has 13 other locations across the U.S.

This feature appeared in the March 2020 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & Engineer, Construction, Construction Digest, Construction News, Constructioneer, Dixie Contractor, Michigan Contractor & Builder, Midwest Contractor, New England Construction, Pacific Builder & Engineer, Rocky Mountain Construction, Texas Contractor, Western Builder

Somethings Never Change…

By Greg Sitek

In construction one of the key components in being successful is completing a project on time or ahead of schedule. Another is completing the project at or under budget. There are many factors that can and do impact both the productivity and cost of a project but a lot depends on the equipment.

If the equipment is dependable and reliable; if the equipment doesn’t perform at it was designed to it’s difficult to be productive and operating costs are up. Throw in a major failure and costs can skyrocket and productivity plummet. 

One critical production machine being down can throw a job behind in every sense and every way.

There is insurance that can prevent this from happening or at least minimize the potential for such a catastrophe happening – good equipment management and good equipment maintenance program.

Equipment, all equipment has always demanded maintenance and management. If the equipment isn’t properly maintained, i.e. following the maintenance programs and procedures as outlined in the owner/operator manuals or online programs provided by the machine’s manufacturer. 

The routine daily inspections and procedures need to be done by your operation either by the equipment operator or company maintenance staff. Periodic or interval maintenance requirements can be fulfilled either by your operation or through contractual arrangements with your equipment dealer. 

To make certain that you are going to get the most out of the equipment make certain that the machine operators and maintenance staff are properly trained, use the correct tools and equipment to do the inspections, repairs and maintenance and use wear-products, i.e. filters, lubricants, belts, hoses, replacements parts, etc. recommended by the manufacturer.

Cutting corners with any of these “components” won’t save you money long term. Quite the contrary, usually it will end up costing much more than you could possibly have saved.

Manage the use and application of the equipment. Establish and follow, religiously, inspections, routine maintenance, wear-part replacement and periodic maintenance as prescribed by the manufacturer. Don’t put off a scheduled maintenance/inspection because you need the machine on the project. Don’t tempt fate. If you need the machine and a routine inspection or maintenance procedure comes up, shut the machine down or bring it in and follow the schedule.   

Use all the available maintenance aids you can to make the job easier, more efficient, more exact. Things like oil and/or fluid analysis provide excellent data on the internal conditions of your equipment.

Use maintenance software programs to help with the scheduling and recordkeeping. Good records are essential to good management and maintenance practices. 

Use your equipment in applications for which it was designed, engineered and manufactured. A piece of equipment that’s too big for an application doesn’t mean you get the job done fasted. 

Intelligent Sizing Drives Success

We’d all love it if we could justify owning and operating the biggest equipment – just to have it in case certain jobs come up that may require that added capacity. But it’s not practical in terms of owning and operating costs, and zoning in on equipment size ranges that best complement your work will make the most sense for your business in the long run.

(Source CASE News: (https://www.casece.com/northamerica/enus/resources/articles/measuring-up-factors-for-sizing-equipment-from-backhoes-to-bulldozers))

What size equipment is right for you?

Determining what size of equipment is best for you depends on many factors. Primarily, it’s the application or exact task you require the machine to do. It also depends on what you expect as a return on investment. Generally, larger and more complex machines have higher purchase and operating costs, and have to be billed out at a higher rate. Smaller machines are more affordable to own and run, but they don’t command the large dollar-per-hour fees their big cousins do.

Equipment sizes vary according to volume demands. Often, the machine’s physical weight and dimensions affect the capacity more than engine horsepower or hydraulic pressure. Transportation is another prime issue when it comes to deciding on the right-sized piece of equipment. Having to purchase or arrange for large-capacity hauling between worksites can be an additional overhead that doesn’t pay back. (Source Warren CAT.com)(https://www.warrencat.com/news/construction-equipment-size-guide/))

It’s March and for most of the country time to start getting the equipment ready for the surge of work and from all indicators, this is going to be a busy construction season across the country. If you have questions about maintenance programs, equipment applications, training for operators and/or maintenance staff contact your local dealers. They are a good and reliable source for virtually all equipment related questions. 

This feature appeared in the March 2020 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & Engineer, Construction, Construction Digest, Construction News, Constructioneer, Dixie Contractor, Michigan Contractor & Builder, Midwest Contractor, New England Construction, Pacific Builder & Engineer, Rocky Mountain Construction, Texas Contractor, Western Builder

CONEXPO CON/AGG and IFPE 2020 to Take Place in March

Registration is still open for the co-located CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2020 exhibitions, North America’s premiere events for the construction industries and the fluid power, power transmission and motion control industries. CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2020 will be held March 10-14 in Las Vegas.

Both CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE have already set exhibit space records and will feature industry-leading education programs. Several show ticket options are available, and all tickets include a monorail pass. New for 2020 is the opportunity to mix and match education sessions between CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE for one price.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE come around every three years for a can’t-miss event. No other shows bring together as many segments of the construction industries and of the fluid power, power transmission and motion control industries in one place.

Attendees will have up-close access to the leading manufacturers and suppliers, latest product innovations, and knowledge resources to help their businesses thrive. For 2020:

  • The Tech Experience returns with two locations.
  • The show campus has expanded with the new Festival Grounds for a total of 10 areas to explore.
  • Plenty of show shuttles and hotel shuttles will run during the event, plus information stands and staff will help attendees easily navigate the show campus.
  • CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE make it easy to prepare with an interactive online exhibitor directory and a show mobile app that will continuously synch to your online customizable show planner.

Education is always a vital component of both CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE to help attendees not only survive, but thrive in a changing and global industry.

Attendees at the 2020 shows can take advantage of more than 180 education sessions packed with timely and actionable information, developed with the guidance of leading industry groups, and delivered by industry experts. 

New for 2020 are mix-and-match sessions between CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE for company teams to cost-effectively obtain learning sessions targeted to their needs.

“The line-up of programming is not only larger than it has ever been but includes a fresh line-up of speakers stacked side-by-side with core programming that is always highly attended,” said Eileen Dickson, Vice President of Education, National Ready Mixed Concrete Association and CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education Committee chair.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education features 10 tracks covering a variety of equipment applications, site development, fleet management, business best practices, technology, safety, and attracting and retaining talent.

IFPE education is grouped in two tracks: Hydraulics and Pneumatics at Work and The Business of Fluid Power. Its popular College Courses return, and new is an IFPE Research Symposium.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education – Targeting the Construction Industries

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education tracks will offer the latest trends and best practices focused on: aggregates; asphalt; concrete; cranes, rigging and aerial lifts; earthmoving and site development; equipment management and maintenance; business management; and safety, plus technology solutions and attracting, engaging and retaining talent.

“The education committee took great care in putting together a program that grows attendee knowledge on building their business on all fronts, whether the technical skills needed in the field or best practices to build their business,” said Graham Brent, CEO of the NCCCO Foundation and CONEXPO-CON/AGG Education Committee vice chair.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020 education includes:

  • Driving New Innovation at Complacent Companies – James Benham, JB Knowledge
  • Drones on Construction Sites for All Contractors – Ryan Murguia/Zach Pieper, Quantum Land Design
  • Gain a Competitive Advantage Through Construction Technology – Tauhira Hoossainy, Milwaukee Tool
  • How to Win the War for Talent – Gregg Schoppman, FMI
  • Safety Training Ninja – Regina McMichael, The Learning Factory, Inc.
  • Technology Trends: Lessons Learned – Helga Jacobsen, United Rentals
  • Top 10 Reasons Why Construction Businesses Fail – Larry Kokklenberg, Center for Business Development

IFPE Education – Focused on Fluid Power

The IFPE College Courses emphasize hands-on technical knowledge on the effective use of hydraulics in mobile equipment. Content includes Fundamentals of Hydraulic Systems; Electro Hydrostatic Actuation; Safety Hydraulics, Best Practices for Modern Machinery; Hydraulics in the Digital Age: Hydraulic Fluid Properties, Efficiency and Contamination Control; and Digital Design.

The IFPE Research Symposium is hosted by IFPE co-owner National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) and runs during lunch (11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) March 11-13. Sessions will showcase the latest fluid power research at U.S. universities being funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve energy efficiency of off-road vehicle hydraulic systems.

“We focused on developing education programs that offer attendees the latest ideas and innovations in fluid power technology, applications and research. Our classes and sessions deliver critical information for engineers and others involved in the design and manufacturing process,” said Eric Lanke, President/CEO, NFPA. 

IFPE 2020 education includes:

  • Additive Manufacturing – Vince Anewenter, Milwaukee School of Engineering
  • Industry of the Future – Prasad Ganorkar, McKinsey & Company
  • IoT – Sharing Data Across Customer Boundaries – Adam Livesay, Elevat
  • Mobile Hydraulic Robotics – Autonomous Machines – Chris Woodard and John O’Neill, Danfoss
  • Workforce Development – Lynn Beyer, NFPA

Learn more and register online at conexpoconagg.com and ifpe.com.

Catching Up to Keep Up

By Greg Sitek

By now you’ve had a chance to face the fact that we are well into the new year 2020, which is also the start of a new decade, the second in this the 21st Century. One of the many things that has change in recent times is the speed at which thing evolve or change. Many people look at the construction industry and think that it is slow to change. Although it may appear to be it isn’t.

Granted, much within the industry doesn’t change — the equipment used doesn’t “look” like it has changed but equipment owners and operators know that it has. Construction equipment is more efficient and more productive; requires less maintenance; is more comfortable in all kinds of weather and all kinds of climates; it has machine controls to assist the operator; some can be operated remotely, and the list goes on.

Typical hand held construction tools have changed evolving from the once standard corded tools to battery powered versions that deliver as much if not more productivity without the hazard of electric cords stretched a jobsite. Lighting has improved radically not only on the mobile equipment but also on the hand-held and on the jobsite. 

If you think about it, there has been a lot of change with the equipment, tools, safety devices, lighting, signs, communications, data and information collection and distribution, design and engineering and management.

Along with these changes have come an endless list of acronyms. If nothing else, our world has gone acronym crazy. Some of them have become a part of our jargon and we know instantly what they while others take time to figure out and still others need someone to explain them to us.

BIM is one of the acronyms that has become more common. What is BIM? Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a process that begins with the creation of an intelligent 3D model and enables document management, coordination and simulation during the entire lifecycle of a project (plan, design, build, operation and maintenance). (Autodesk.com)

What is BIM used for? BIM is used to design and document building and infrastructure designs. Every detail of a building is modeled in BIM. The model can be used for analysis to explore design options and to create visualizations that help stakeholders understand what the building will look like before it’s built. The model is then used to generate the design documentation for construction. (Autodesk.com)

What is the process of BIM? The process of BIM supports the creation of intelligent data that can be used throughout the lifecycle of a building or infrastructure project. (Autodesk.com)

Another acronym that has become popular is IoT — The Internet of Things is a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, objects, animals or people that are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction. Wikipedia

We ran a few article on IoT in the ACP magazines and on this website. The most recent, Construction Enters the IoT Age, was posted on December 15, 2019 (http://www.site-kconstructionzone.com/?p=17582). According to market research firm, IDC, worldwide IoT spending will surpass the $1 trillion mark in 2022. It’s already disrupting many industries – from gathering sensory data on agricultural crops, trucking routes or the state of consumer appliances, to monitoring patient heart rates in healthcare. Construction has joined this IoT revolution. A study released by Dodge Data and Analytics, in partnership with Triax Technologies, found that nearly three-quarters of contractors surveyed believe IoT will help them control occupational risks, and about half expect it to reduce risks to the public, as well as financial risks and those related to property damage and construction defects.

Another article, The Future of Construction from DEWALT — Introducing the New Age of Jobsite Connectivity, was posted on May 31, 2017 (http://www.site-kconstructionzone.com/?p=14373). This article looks at the use of IoT to help contractors with asset management on the job. 

What’s next? How about, PBA – Project Business Automation. Project Business Automation (PBA) defines a new software category that integrates the fragmented project application landscape into one system, allowing information to flow freely throughout the enterprise, which means radically better and timelier insight and business management capabilities.

Project Business Automation is changing how project business gets done. It takes companies from a disparate and cumbersome collection of manual processes and business applications to a unified, holistic approach to their business. It takes a revolutionary look at the project business and enable entirely new capabilities that drive substantial improvements in efficiency, visibility, and control that ultimately lead to better project outcomes. ( http://www.adeaca.com/    )

Watch for articles on PBA in future issues of the ACP magazines. Meanwhile, to get caught up and/or keep current with changes in the industry take in some of the 203 educational session at the upcoming CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020, March 7-10, LasVegas NE.

This editorial appeared in the 2020 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & Engineer, Construction, Construction Digest, Construction News, Constructioneer, Dixie Contractor, Michigan Contractor & Builder, Midwest Contractor, New England Construction, Pacific Builder & Engineer, Rocky Mountain Construction, Texas Contractor, Western Builder

GPS Tracking of Light/Medium Duty Fleets Increases Profitability Through Driver Accountability

By Carlo Chatman, Power PR

For any company with a fleet of light or medium duty vehicles, from service contractors to vendors and those in the transportation industry, increasing profitability often comes down to fostering an environment of greater employee accountability.

The concept of accountability is defined as “the obligation of an individual to account for his/her activities, accept responsibility for them and to disclose the results in a transparent manner.” Implied in this definition is the ability to verify tasks are completed as expected, on time, efficiently and per company policy. For fleet managers, this can only be accomplished through real-time GPS tracking devices on all vehicles.

After all, it is an established fact that drivers that know they are being monitored by such systems are less likely to make unnecessary detours or stops for personal reasons, may avoid spending unnecessary time at job sites or avoid idling the engine while filling out paperwork in the vehicle.

But accountability is not about discovering what a driver is doing “wrong,” it is actually more about what the driver is doing right. Through GPS tracking, drivers can take more ownership for their jobs, have more clarity of tasks and results, can self-correct, improve and do not have to be micromanaged. 

Advanced Tracking Technologies’ GPS tracking systems are used in the construction industry to provide employees and owners accountability and peace of mind. 

Even well intentioned drivers may discover that there are areas of improvement and efficiencies that could make them more productive. 

There are also indirect benefits as well. When all drivers are monitored, those not pulling their weight are more easily identified so faster, more productive employees do not have to pick up the slack with extra deliveries or service visits.

Finally, with greater accountability, higher performing employees are more likely to be recognized and rewarded based on verifiable performance.

So, with a host of benefits for the employee, fleet managers that have avoided the “leap” to GPS tracking are missing out on a win-win scenario. After all, more accountable drivers lead to greater efficiency overall, which means increased profits. It’s an argument that is hard to deny, particularly as GPS tracking continues to improve while the cost of entry plummets.

Holding Drivers to a Higher Standard

Although GPS trackers have been around for some time, advances in the technology allows for more real-time tracking and simplified reporting. Fleet managers, after all, don’t want to spend all day on their computers sifting through complex analytical data. Instead, they want simplified, easy to read reports that summarize what they need to know. Fortunately, such systems exist today and at rates less than $20 per vehicle.

The advanced units today allow real-time and historical tracking of each vehicle in a fleet. This allows dispatchers to assign the closest vehicle to a job, which expedites the service work or delivery and saves gas, labor, and vehicle wear-and-tear. It also allows historical routing analysis, which enables even greater routing efficiencies to be determined on an individual or fleet-wide basis.

Through GPS tracking, drivers can take more ownership for their jobs, have more clarity of tasks and results, can self-correct, improve and do not have to be micromanaged.  
 SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

However, the greatest improvements in fleet management occur when GPS tracking devices are used to hold drivers to a clear, unbiased standard to encourage better performance for the company and themselves.

Real Life Results

As an example, when Reilly Construction & Development implemented their first GPS tracking system last year, the Vero Beach, Florida-based residential and commercial construction company benefited from significant productivity gains and operational efficiencies.

The construction company has installed Shadow Tracker Vision III GPS tracking devices from Advanced Tracking Technologies (ATTI), a Houston, Texas-based designer and manufacturer of GPS tracking products, on two of their construction trucks. 

Compared with typical GPS tracking devices that may only update every few minutes,

the device provides real-time location updates every 10-seconds, as well as location, speed and idle time alerts if something is amiss. This data is transmitted via satellite and cellular networks to a smartphone or PC on a 24/7 basis.

With such accountability for how every minute of each day is spent, employees know they are always “on the clock”. This helps to eliminate frivolous or unnecessary stops during the workday, and decreases wasted time during a stop. 

“Now we know exactly where our vehicles and drivers are in real time,” says Sharon Arnold, Office and Assistant Project Manager at Reilly Construction & Development. “We can spot check our drivers to make sure they are where they are supposed to be and not at unauthorized places because some people will take advantage. That has saved us a few thousand dollars in salary alone. The system more than pays for itself in enhanced productivity.”

On the plus side for employees, the use of such GPS tracking systems helps verify on-time arrival at customer sites. And automated reporting such as that provided by the ATTI system can virtually eliminate the reporting burden for employee and employer in regard to driving logs. Automated exception reporting can also flag potential issues that need to be corrected, such as excess vehicle mileage or idling.

“We are trying to work smarter, not harder,” says Arnold. “We are trying to make things simple and straight forward. With everything out in the open, people know what to expect.”

Increased Productivity, Reduced Fuel

Once drivers and the work crew know they are accountable for their actions, it is amazing how much more they will accomplish. Using such an approach with advanced GPS tracking commonly improves productivity 10 to 20 percent while reducing fuel costs 10 to 15 percent, as drivers start to pay attention to their driving and work habits throughout the day.

Indiana-based Gordon Plumbing Inc., which offers services ranging from small fixes to remodeling and construction, currently uses ATTI’s GPS tracking system on 54 vehicles, and has used three different tracking systems over the last decade.

“The ATTI system not only expedites job dispatching but also enhances accountability and profitability while reducing costs,” says Shannon Allen, Gordon Plumbing Service Coordinator. 

Allen points out that being able to access a vehicle’s position in real time means “our vehicles can reach customers very quickly when there are emergencies.” She adds, “If our drivers on the job need help from a tech specialist, we can immediately find one in their area and dispatch them to that address.”

According to Allen, the system provides one link for all the covered vehicles. “The GPS tracking system puts our vehicles on a map, so I can see all of them at once,” she says, noting that the view can be narrowed to any department or geographic area, as desired. “It is so accurate that it lets me see exactly where a vehicle is parked.”

Because the GPS system is automated, reports are delivered without anyone having to open software. In addition to the real time views of the activity taking place, next day reports are delivered by email, documenting everything that happened the day before. The reports can be customized, for example, to show how many drivers idled for more than 30 minutes or how many miles were put on a vehicle.

Allen emphasizes that the system can quickly spot driver habits that need correction, such as a driver stopping for five or 10 minutes between jobs several times a day. 

“With the GPS system, we are able to notice and point out that even five to 10 minutes stops between jobs each day adds up to a lot of lost productivity,” says Allen. She concludes, however, that her drivers are quite used to the system and even appreciate it when it proves that they are getting to and doing their jobs as required.

For a free demo, visit https://www.advantrack.com/free-demo/. For more information contact Advanced Tracking Technologies, 6001 Savoy Drive, Suite 301, Houston, TX 77036; visit www.advantrack.com; call 800-279-0035; email sales@advantrack.com. 

This feature appeared in the January 2020 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & Engineer, Construction, Construction Digest, Construction News, Constructioneer, Dixie Contractor, Michigan Contractor & Builder, Midwest Contractor, New England Construction, Pacific Builder & Engineer, Rocky Mountain Construction, Texas Contractor, Western Builder