Tag Archive for 'economy'

NAPA Reports: Use of Recycled Asphalt Reaches New High

New Asphalt Pavements Contain, on Average, 21.1 Percent
Material Reclaimed From Old Roads and Parking Lots

Asphalt pavements are the most consistently recycled material in the United States. Every day as part of maintenance and improvement projects, old asphalt pavement material is reclaimed from roads and parking lots and then put back to use in new pavements.

In fact, according to the latest industry survey by the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) in partnership with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) more than 100 million tons of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) was collected for re-use in the United States during 2018, saving some 61.4 million cubic yards of landfill space. This survey has been conducted for each construction season since 2009 by NAPA, and it has consistently found that nearly 100 percent of RAP is put to beneficial uses, primarily new asphalt pavements.

“Over the years, we’ve seen steady advancement in the amount of RAP being used across the country. This has been the result of concerted engineering efforts by industry and road owners to research and apply best practices to ensure we maintain or improve performance while increasing the use of recycled materials,” stated NAPA President & CEO Audrey Copeland, Ph.D., P.E. “As interest grows in incorporating other recycled materials into pavements, we must continue to gain a solid understanding of how new materials affect pavement performance before we move to widespread deployment.”

Nationally, the average amount of RAP in new asphalt pavements during 2018 was 21.1 percent, which is the highest level reported since the survey began in 2009. The survey found that 82.2 million tons of RAP, along with 1.05 million tons of recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) were used in 389.3 million tons of new asphalt pavement mixes in the United States during 2018.

An additional 8.8 million tons of RAP and RAS were used as aggregate, in cold-mix asphalt, and other road-building activities. The survey also found that at year-end 2018 about 111.7 million tons of RAP and RAS was stockpiled for future use across the country.

Although national usage estimates were not calculated, respondents to the survey reported recycling some 1.8 million tons of recycled tire rubber, steel, and blast furnace slags, cellulose fiber, and other reclaimed and waste materials into nearly 12.3 million tons of asphalt paving mixtures during 2018.

In total, more than 85 million tons of recycled materials — primarily RAP and RAS — were used in new asphalt pavement mixtures during the 2018 construction season, a 7.6 percent increase from the number of recycled materials used in 2017. The use of RAP and RAS alone resulted in cost savings of more than $2.9 billion compared to the use of virgin materials.

The asphalt pavement industry also continues to make significant use of energy-saving warm-mix asphalt (WMA) technologies. In 2018, 157.4 million tons of asphalt pavement mixture was produced using WMA technologies. More than half of this tonnage was produced at reduced temperatures, meaning less energy was required in manufacturing. The most common WMA technology used is plant-based foaming, which injects a small amount of water into the asphalt during production. A number of environmental, worker safety and construction benefits have been realized through the adoption of WMA technologies.

“A decade ago, WMA technologies were a novel idea. In 2018, though, more than half the asphalt pavement mixture tonnage produced in 23 states used WMA technologies, and in six of those states, it was more than 75 percent of the tonnage,” stated John Harper, 2019 NAPA Chairman and Senior Vice President of Construction Partners Inc. in Dothan, Alabama. “While there remains room to grow their use, WMA technologies have become just another tool we can use to produce the best asphalt mixture to meet a given project or agency need.”

The survey was conducted in the first quarter of 2019. Results from 272 companies with 1,329 plants in 49 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and two U.S. territories, along with data from state asphalt pavement associations for 33 states, were used to compile the report. A copy of the full survey report, including a state-by-state breakdown of data, is available at www.asphaltpavement.org/recycling.

About the National Asphalt Pavement Association

The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) is the only trade association that exclusively represents the interests of the asphalt producer/contractor on the national level with Congress, government agencies, and other national trade and business organizations. NAPA supports an active research program designed to improve the quality of asphalt pavements and paving techniques used in the construction of roads, streets, highways, parking lots, airports, and environmental and recreational facilities. The association provides technical, educational, and marketing materials and information to its members; supplies product information to users and specifiers of paving materials; and conducts training courses. The association, which counts more than 1,100 companies as members, was founded in 1955.

ARTBA Safety Certification Program Reaches Milestone

Home to the Industry’s Only Internationally-Accredited Safety Program puttingsafetyfirst.org

Bradley Middleton, a safety manager at Drill Tech Drilling and Shoring Inc., of Antioch, Calif., is the 400th industry professional to earn the Safety Certification for Transportation Project Professionals™ (SCTPP) credential, marking a major milestone in the program.

“I am excited to be able to use my training to pass the certification process and hold a Safety Certification for Transportation Project Professionals,” said Middleton. “The credential serves as a reaffirmation of my dedication to safety, and I hope more and more construction professionals continue to earn it.”

The SCTPP credential continues to gain traction within the transportation construction sector, with professionals from nearly 100 companies and agencies in 37 states and Washington, D.C. passing the exam.

Launched in fall 2016 by top industry executives and safety advocates via the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) Foundation, the SCTPP is designed to reduce or ideally eliminate the nearly 50,000 deaths and injuries each year on or near U.S. transportation infrastructure construction projects. It is aimed at workers, supervisors, foremen, inspectors, designers, planners, equipment operators, manufacturers, materials suppliers and owners who impact safety–ensuring they know the core competencies necessary to identify and mitigate potentially life-threatening on-site risks.

In May 2018, the SCTPP earned the “seal of approval” from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). It is the only internationally-accredited safety program in the transportation construction industry.

The milestone comes as major transportation construction contractors are calling on their industry peers to commit at least 25 employees annually to earn the SCTPP credential before the end of 2019, in 2020, and beyond. ARTBA Chairman Bob Alger, chairman of The Lane Construction Corporation; Ross Myers, chairman, and CEO of Allan Myers; and David Walls, president, and CEO of Austin Industries, together recently issued the challenge.  Myers and Walls co-chair the commission overseeing the program’s operations.

A complete list of the 415 entries, companies and public agencies with employees who have become “safety certified,” can be found here.

To learn more about the certification exam and eligibility requirements, visit puttingsafetyfirst.org.

The ARTBA Foundation’s Safety Certification for Transportation Project Professionals™ Safety Certification Program (SCTPP) program was established in 2016:

Its vision:

“To ensure the safety and well-being of construction workers, motorists, truck drivers, pedestrians and their families by making transportation project sites worldwide zero-incident zones.”

The program was developed by the senior executives from America’s leading transportation design and construction firms, senior federal and state transportation agency officials, and top labor union officials.

Its mission:

“To make safety top-of-mind for all professionals involved in the planning, design, management, materials delivery and construction of transportation projects from inception through completion.”

This is achieved by providing and encouraging an accredited certification program to the International Organization for Standardization and the International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC 17024) Conformity Assessment—General Requirements for Bodies Operating Certification of Persons as administered by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

SCTPP is the transportation construction industry’s only internationally-accredited safety program.

To learn more, watch this video and download our two program brochures.

https://youtu.be/kJ_X5LiYbPU

https://youtu.be/87nSmNJMYF0

 

Getting Started

  1. Read the Candidate HandbookFAQs (test dates, topics, costs, etc.) and eligibility requirements.
  2. Complete the application.  You will pay for your exam at the end of the application. If you are eligible, the ARTBA certification department will email you within 15 business days, with an approval of your application and instructions to on how to schedule your exam.
  3. Schedule your exam with a Pearson VUE test center. Find the nearest test center.

Forms:

The Exam & Certification

Candidates must check into a Pearson VUE test center using one form of primary identification with a photo and signature, and a second form of identification.  The name on the ID must match exactly the name submitted on the application.

The following forms are accepted as primary ID:

  • government-issued driver’s license
  • state/national identification card
  • U.S. Passport or alien registration card (green card, permanent resident visa)

The following forms are accepted as secondary ID: any ID on the primary list, Social Security card or credit/bank ATM card (signature required), employer I.D. card.

Score reports shall be issued onsite following completion of the examination. Candidates who fail the exam may request diagnostic feedback regarding their performance on the exam.

Only candidates who are successful in passing the written examination for the certification, meet all criteria for certification, and remain in good standing are considered certified.

Certificates shall be issued generally within 30 days of receipt of examination results.

Renew your credentials by meeting our recertification requirements and submitting documentation to maintain certification every 36 months after your exam date.

 If you have additional questions, please email certificationteam@sctpp.org.

 

 

 

American Rental Association Survey Results: Contractors expect to increase rental activity

Survey: Contractors expect to increase rental activity

ARA commissions “Rental Customer Needs Study”

 Among professional construction contractors who rented equipment in the past year, a majority expects to increase reliance on rental in the year ahead, according to a comprehensive survey of contractors released by the American Rental Association (ARA).

The “Rental Customer Needs Study,” conducted by RSG, an independent research firm for ARA, found that 93 percent of professional contractors surveyed rented equipment in the last year. Of those who rented, 92 percent planned to rent as least as much as last year and 52 percent expected to increase renting over the next year.

Portable toilets, lifts and scaffolding, backhoes, dump trucks, and mini excavators are the most popular rental items among contractors, the study found. Reasons contractors rented included: it made more financial sense than buying equipment (45 percent); they needed equipment for immediate use and did not want to purchase (43 percent), and they needed to use the equipment infrequently or only for a short time period (43 percent).

Earth Digger Driver at construction site

Contractors who expect to rent more next year will do so because they plan to use what they currently rent more frequently or they plan to take on more quick-turnaround projects, the study concluded.

More than 90 percent of survey participants said rental locations are doing an excellent job of providing their customers with satisfying rental experiences. According to the study, there are five key things that professional contractors want from their local rental company:

  • Attentive customer service
  • Reliable, well-maintained and varied equipment
  • Online engagement
  • Clear communication
  • Rewards

Tony Conant, ARA CEO, said the research findings will help guide ARA members in their mission to deliver a premier rental experience.

“We invested in this study to better understand the evolving needs and preferences of contractors,” Conant said. “It’s exciting that so many professional contractors are thinking of rental first for their equipment needs.   With these new research insights, our rental members will have information and knowledge to better serve the needs of this segment.”

Data for the study came from surveys of various types of contractors including residential building, specialty, non-residential and commercial building, landscape, utility, road and highway construction, site development/earthmoving, and more.

Full survey results are available to ARA members on the ARA website, www.ararental.org. Nonmembers can download a free white paper at www.ararental.org. ARA offers a rental store locator at www.RentalHQ.com for association members.

About ARA: (www.ARArental.org) The American Rental Association, Moline, Ill., is an international trade association for owners of equipment and event rental businesses and the manufacturers and suppliers of construction/industrial, general tool and party/event rental equipment. ARA members, which include more than 10,500 rental businesses and more than 1,000 manufacturers and suppliers, are located in every U.S. state, every Canadian province and more than 30 countries worldwide. Founded in 1955, ARA is the source for information, advocacy, education, networking and marketplace opportunities for the equipment and event rental industry throughout the world.

A Little Road Work

A Little Road Work

By Greg Sitek

Greg Sitek

What’s going to happen on September 30, 2020? The FAST Act — Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act — is scheduled to expire?

Will it?

If it does will it make a difference?

The American Road and Transportation Builders Association is working overtime to develop information and materials that can be used to guide the committees and congressional overseeing the reauthorization program and has taken a leadership role in informing the  industry and public as well.

Mark Holan, editorial director, ARTBA reports,ARTBA’s “Project 2019 Reauthorization Task Force,” comprised of 26 volunteer leaders from all eight-membership divisions, developed the industry’s legislative blueprint for the next highway and transit bill. The ARTBA Board unanimously approved the thoughtful and comprehensive policy report in May.

Visit ARTBA at artba.org to view a digital copy of the 32-page report, “The Road to the Next Federal Highway & Public Transit Investment Bill.”

Dean Franks, senior vice president, congressional relations, ARTBA says that ARTBA President and CEO Dave Bauer July 11 told members of the House Democratic Caucus to include a Highway Trust Fund revenue solution as part of any infrastructure legislation this year. Bauer reminded the members of Congress of the reliance states have on the federal transportation programs for highway construction spending.

The map above, created by ARTBA staff using Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) data, was distributed to the members. It shows states, on average, depend on the federal government for 51 percent of their highway construction programs.

The closed-door session featured other business and labor executives who also emphasized the need to address the long-term solvency of the trust fund. Members of Congress who spoke touched on the need to get a robust infrastructure package completed, as well as the various options for funding and financing transportation investments. Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) organized the meeting.

A comprehensive infrastructure bill in the House of Representatives has yet to materialize, though discussions between the White House and the Congress are reportedly ongoing. The Senate Environment & Public Works Committee is pushing ahead on the reauthorization of a surface transportation bill, with a mark-up of a bill scheduled for Aug. 1.

Again, ARTBA’s Dean Franks adds,The bipartisan leaders of the Senate Environment & Public Works (EPW) Committee traded priorities for an upcoming surface reauthorization bill during a July 10 hearing.  Chairman John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) was the first to reference those users of the system should be the ones to pay for the infrastructure investments and particularly mentioned the need for electric vehicle drivers to begin paying into the system. Ranking Democrat Tom Carper (D-Del.) said, “I have always believed that a long-term focus on national needs must include identifying new source of sustainable, user-fee base revenues to support investments in transportation.”

Barrasso also publicly announced for the first time that the legislation the committee is drafting would be a five-year bill. The two committee leaders said they want to pass a bipartisan bill out of committee before the Senate adjourns for the annual summer work period. An Aug. 1 target has been set for consideration in the committee.

This will be the first action on a surface transportation law since enactment of the FAST Act in December of 2015. That law, which expires in September 2020, required $70 billion in General Fund transfers and unrelated offsets to help pay for the bill.

The EPW committee has jurisdiction over the highway policy provisions of a surface transportation authorization process, while three other committees will need to weigh in on public transportation, trucking, rail and tax issues.

ARTBA will continue working with Barrasso, Carper and all committee members to get a bill with increased and growing investment levels approved out of committee as soon as possible.

In the “summer driving season” editorial by The Washington Post, it points out,‘States Are Doing It. So Why Hasn’t Congress Increased the Federal Gas Tax?’
On July 1, gas taxes went up in 13 states, not only blue ones such as California and Illinois, but also red ones such as Indiana, Nebraska, South Carolina and Tennessee.

Roads, the importance of roads and transportation goes back to The Appian Way or Via Appia Antica in Rome, one of the most famous ancient roads. It was built in 312 B.C. by Appius Claudius Caecus. … Roman roads and especially the Appian Way were extremely important to Rome. It allowed trade and access to the east, specifically Greece. The importance of roads hasn’t changed; it’s become paramount to our way of life.

Maintaining our transportation infrastructure isn’t an expense it’s an investment.

ARTBA Reports: A Big Week for Regulatory Reform

By Mark Holan, editorial director, ARTBA

The Trump administration this week announced three regulatory measures with significant impact for ARTBA members:

  • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration published a request for information asking the regulated community to help clarify various aspects of the crystalline silica rule.
  • The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) released proposed changes to the federal Hours of Service (HOS) rules, which govern the amount of time truck drivers can spend on the road.
  • An overhaul of the Endangered Species Act includes new limits to where the government can block development by declaring land as “critical habitat.”

“These three developments highlight the administration’s continued focus on removing unnecessary regulatory burdens from the project delivery process,” said ARTBA Vice President of Regulatory & Legal Issues Nick Goldstein. “ARTBA will continue to work with federal agencies to keep advancing beneficial regulatory reforms.”

ARTBA also expects in the coming weeks to hear from the U.S. Department of Transportation about the potential repeal of a federal regulation that prohibits state and local governments from using patented or proprietary products on highway and bridge projects that receive federal funding unless those products qualify for limited exceptions. The rule was adopted in 1916 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which then managed the emerging federal-aid highway program.

Additionally, the administration is expected to continue to move forward on the repeal and replacement of the “waters of the United States” rule.

Click the links in the three bullet points above to read more detailed stories about this week’s regulatory developments.