Tag Archive for 'Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)'

Tom Ewing’s Environmental Update

*  Price points.  French gas prices during the Yellow Vest chaos were about $1.53/liter on the day I checked; a US equivalent of $5.78/gallon.  Gas in my area dropped to $1.98/gallon, about 52¢/liter.  Around the same time, Yahoo! News reported that an Exxon, Hess, and NCOOC off-shore exploration project confirmed the discovery of 5 billion barrels of recoverable oil, with exploration continuing.  Estimated recovery cost: $35/barrel (in the ocean!).  In other words, cheap oil, just about forever.  I like how Hamlet said it: “There are more hydrocarbons recoverable on Earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”  Value is frequently judged by how much people will pay for something, and then they won’t.  Value is hard to assess with grand, singular cultural creations and monuments; you know, maybe like what’s the value of the Arc de Triomphe, damaged during the French protests?  Now it’s clear: The treasures of France are not worth $5.78/gallon.  If gas costs less, they stay.  If it costs more, the Arc and all that old stuff va être brûlé au sol!
*  On Friday, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) announced the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for “the Construction and Operation Plan (COP) submitted by Vineyard Wind LLC (Vineyard Wind).” The Draft analyzes potential environmental impacts of the proposed Vineyard Wind project and reasonable alternatives. The Notice starts the public review and comment period and it presents the dates and locations of public hearings.  The project would install up to 100 wind turbine generators, each with a capacity of between 8 and 10 MW in an area approximately 12 nautical miles from the southeast corner of Martha’s Vineyard and a similar distance from the southwest side of Nantucket.  The comment period ends January 22, 2019.
*  Update: I asked the MA’s Governor’s office about The Commission on the Future of Transportation in the Commonwealth Report, noted last week to be late; it was due by December 1.  “No specific date can be conveyed today,” a staff person wrote back, “please feel free to check back with me next week.”  This really isn’t about one more state transportation report.  I mean, you could rebuild the Taj Mahal with state transportation reports printed and filed over the last decades.  There are two bigger issues: one, missed deadlines devalue the work.  “It’s just not that important” is the signal from the top, about issues supposedly undertaken in the public’s interest.  Second, although apparently not likely with this work, what about the people who need the report so they can make next-step decisions?  Isn’t their time worth anything?  A web page note would be thoughtful, e.g., “Sorry, the report’s delayed!  Late comments deserve a careful review!  Thanks for understanding!”  The message now? “Get over it, peons, you’re just so not worth it.”
Tom Ewing
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Tom Ewing’s Environmental Update

* It’s a big country I: A new Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for transport is available from the US Forest Service: “Pack and Saddle Stock Outfitter-Guide Special Use Permit Issuance.” Topic: protection of wilderness from commercial tour and guide services in the Pasayten and Lake Chelan Sawtooth Wilderness areas in Washington state. USFS writes that “pack and saddle stock use is an appropriate mode of transportation in wilderness, since it does not include any mechanized or motorized equipment.” Tourists and others (e.g., research groups) are not skilled in stock handling, do not own stock and equipment, do not have the knowledge of stock handling techniques that minimize resource damage, and would be endangering their lives and the lives of others because of the hazards associated with stock. The comment period ends January 9, 2017.

* It’s a big country II: A Superconducting Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) (SCMAGLEV) Project is being developed by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) and Maryland DOT to run between Washington, DC, and Baltimore, MD, with an intermediate stop at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall (BWI) Airport. FRA announced an EIS on this project last week. FRA writes that the “Proposed Action consists of the construction and operation of a high-speed SCMAGLEV train system.” Written comments on the scope of the EIS are due by December 27. FRA plans two public scoping meetings: December, 2016 and January, 2017. I’ll try to update.

* Office of Management and Budget is preparing to rule in December that companies selling to the federal government must disclose whether or not they publicly report greenhouse gas emissions and reduction targets. The reporting doesn’t have to be to the government, the numbers just have to be publicly available somewhere. This would be mandatory for vendors who received $7.5 million or more in Federal contract awards in the preceding Federal fiscal year; it’s voluntary for all other vendors. OMB writes that “an annual representation will promote transparency and demonstrate the Federal Government’s commitment to reducing supply chain emissions.” Furthermore, the government will “have accurate, up-to-date information on its suppliers.” This idea was first proposed last May. OMB didn’t receive any public comments. But apparently a comment period remains open because if you want to make comments they are due on or before December 22, 2016.

Tom Ewing