Tag Archive for 'equipment'

Are You Tuned In? CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio Podcasts Top 110,000 Downloads

Are You Tuned In?
CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio Podcasts Top 110,000 Downloads
Listen to Learn the Latest Construction Trends & Technologies

 Interest in staying ahead of the latest construction industry trends and technologies has propelled CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio podcast downloads to more than 110,000 since its launch prior to the 2017 exposition.

With an average of 1,200 downloads per episode, the CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio podcast is in the top 25 percent of all podcasts, according to Libsyn podcast hosting service. Downloads have come from 184 countries.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio podcasts feature discussions with world-class experts exploring innovations in the construction industry and the opportunities they create.

Topics cover construction, technology, occupational health and safety, regulations, and education, with tips and trends to help construction professionals optimize their businesses and job sites. Guests include original-equipment manufacturers (OEMs), tech companies, academia and leading industry organizations.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio is brought to you by Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM).

“Our audience has grown rapidly, and reaching over 110,000 downloads reinforces how much interest there is in the construction technology space and in exploring innovations that will change the industry in the next 20 years,” said Nicole Hallada, AEM vice president marketing, and communications. “I’m excited at the opportunity this medium brings for busy professionals to conveniently access cutting-edge information that helps them succeed.”

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio host is Peggy Smedley, an internationally known and award-winning author, radio/TV host, and speaker who focuses on educating businesses and consumers on the latest technological advances that are shaping our everyday lives.

“I’m a firm advocate in all things construction technology and the response to our interviews have been phenomenal; people want that reassurance that they’re headed in the right direction and as the host of CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio, I believe it’s doing just that,” said Smedley.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio currently airs two new episodes each month. Listeners can choose episodes via the CONEXPO-CON/AGG website or through their mobile devices (apps include iTunes, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Spotify and Google Play).

CONEXPO-CON/AGG Radio is complemented by AEM’s CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 industry-trends articles.

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CONEXPO-CON/AGG is the international gathering place every three years for the construction industries, spotlighting the latest technologies, products and best practices. The next show is set for March 10-14, 2020 in Las Vegas USA.

AEM is the Milwaukee-based international trade group representing the off-road equipment manufacturing industry. AEM’s world-class exhibitions include CONEXPO-CON/AGG and ICUEE-The Demo Expo.

Changes in Volvo CE dealer network reflect the company’s strategy to meet customers’ needs

– Volvo Construction Equipment has made several changes to its dealer network over the last year, adding new dealers, and in some cases, expanding veteran dealers’ territories.

– The moves reflect the company’s strategy to outperform the competition in three key areas: providing the highest uptime values in the industry, offering unique solutions to customer business challenges and raising the lifecycle value of its machines.

Volvo Construction Equipment’s (Volvo CE) North American dealer network has seen a number of changes over the last year. Dealerships have changed hands, territories have expanded and new players have emerged on the scene to sell the company’s premium equipment and offer its services. The moves all help deliver customer value in three key areas: uptime, unique customer solutions and machine lifecycle value.

The new dealers that have become part of the Volvo CE network are all seasoned, veteran companies with extensive histories in their regions. They know their markets and customers well and are uniquely capable of helping Volvo CE achieve its strategic goals. Several of the dealers have shown prior success in selling Mack and Volvo Trucks, for example, while others have long been tied to Volvo CE, but are now offering sales of its equipment.

The new dealers include:
Housby Heavy Equipment, in Iowa

Wise Heavy Equipment, in Nebraska

TranSource Truck & Equipment, in South Dakota

Hawaii Truck Parts, Sales and Services, in Hawaii

Alta Equipment Company, expanding territory to Illinois

Stephen Roy, president of Volvo CE North America, said the company’s strategy is a result of extensive market research to learn just what customers want and need from the industry, and that these dealers are well-positioned to deliver on the company’s goals.

“When I came on board as president in 2017, I immediately set out to hear from customers across the Americas,” he explained. “Customers need more uptime from their machines. They also need more consulting from our experts to come up with unique solutions to their business problems. And they want higher residual values from their equipment partners. With these updates to our dealer network, we are positioning Volvo CE to compete — and win — the market in these areas.”

The times they are a-changing
The dealer network updates come at a crucial time for the industry when innovation and new technologies are set to permanently alter the sector. The new dealers have all pledged to align their strategic priorities with the company, embracing the focus on uptime, unique customer solutions and maintaining machine lifecycle values. They have joined the entire Volvo CE dealer network in undergoing intense training with Volvo CE and a variety of third-party experts to become equipped for these strategic goals, as well as the changing marketplace.

To win in uptime, for example, dealers need to become experts in areas such as telematics and predictive analytics. Dealers of the future could have “uptime managers” or other roles that support the industry’s shift toward outcome-based business models (such as generating efficiencies and ensuring all downtime is planned). Dealers will shift toward offering construction companies services that are more consultative, helping them manage costs, fleets, human resources, new technology and more.

Volvo CE dealers are already thinking this way. A significant portion of them are already highly engaged with ActiveCare Direct, and as new dealers come on board, they too will become experts in using the industry-unique telematics and remote monitoring system to increase uptime for their customers on their job sites. A recent, notable example is Flagler Construction Equipment’s use of the program on more than 70 machines for Florida’s I-4 Ultimate megaproject.

“We have ActiveCare Direct on all of the excavators being used on the project. It’s very important to us,” explained Tommy Ball, senior vice president of Flagler. “Volvo monitors ActiveCare and we also actively monitor it through our field service support center in Orlando. It really works out great for us — not only does it save us time, it saves the customer downtime.”

Similarly, Volvo CE is working with its entire dealer network on programs that offer unique solutions and boost machine lifecycle values, both of which the company will soon be announcing to the public. Until then, the focus remains on enhancing the capabilities of the company’s dealer network, with an eye toward helping them become the dealers of the future.

“It’s quite an exciting time to be a part of Volvo CE, and particularly to become one of our dealers,” Roy explained. “We aim to be a company that is easy to do business with, and that means making it easy to partner with us, but also it means that we have to equip our dealers for the future. New innovations, new ways to provide services and new market dynamics are all on the horizon, and Volvo CE is ensuring that our dealers will take the lead.”

DEWALT® Expands Battery and Charger Offerings

DEWALT® announces the continued expansion of the FLEXVOLT® System with the dual-voltage 20V/60V MAX* FLEXVOLT® 12.0Ah Battery (DCB612). In addition, DEWALT announces the new 4-Port Fast Charger (DCB104) which simultaneously charges four FLEXVOLT® 12.0Ah Batteries (sold separately) in 120 minutes. By combining long runtime with fast charge time, DEWALT reduces downtime on the job site.

The 20V/60V MAX* FLEXVOLT® 12.0Ah Battery (DCB612) is optimized for use in new and existing DEWALT tools designed for high-power applications. These tools include the new 2,100 Max Watts Out (MWO) 9 in. 60V MAX* Cut-Off Saw (DCS690) as well as the existing 2,400 MWO 60V MAX* 7-1/4 in. Worm Drive Style Saw (DCS577), the 1,700 MWO 60V MAX* 4.5 in. to 6 in. Grinder (DCG414), and the 2,100 MWO 120V MAX* 12 in. Double Bevel Compound Sliding Miter Saw (DHS790). DEWALT FLEXVOLT® batteries are also backward compatible with most DEWALT 20V MAX* tools.

The 4-Port Fast Charger (DCB104) not only charges the new 20V/60V MAX* FLEXVOLT® 12.0Ah Battery (DCB612), but it also offers multi-platform versatility for use with 12V MAX* and 20V MAX* DEWALT batteries. The Fast Charger is compatible with the ToughSystem® storage system allowing for convenient transport and storage. Including through-hole wall mounts, a cord wrap, and transport handles, the Fast Charger can be conveniently carried from truck to tool crib. In addition, the 4-Port Fast Charger is Tool Connect™ Tag Ready™, providing a flat surface where the Tag (sold separately) can be attached. Tool Connect™ is a 3-part inventory management solution that encompasses the Tool Connect™ Inventory Manager web portal, the Tool Connect™ mobile app, and connected products.

From 1.5Ah to 3.0Ah compact batteries, 4.0Ah to 6.0Ah XR® batteries, and 6.0Ah to 12.0Ah FLEXVOLT® batteries, DEWALT offers the right combination of ergonomics and runtime for just about any application, while innovative charging solutions keep batteries ready for use. Coming in summer 2018, the 20V/60V MAX* FLEXVOLT® 12.0Ah Battery (DCB612) will be available where DEWALT products are sold and will come standard with a three-year limited warranty, three-year free service contract and 90-day money-back guarantee. The 4-Port Fast Charger (DCB104) will be available where DEWALT products are sold  and will come standard with a three-year limited warranty, one-year free service contract and 90-day money-back guarantee.

With respect to 12V MAX* – Maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 12 volts. Nominal voltage is 10.6.

With respect to 20V MAX* – Maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 20 volts. Nominal voltage is 18.

With respect to 60V MAX* – Maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 60 volts. Nominal voltage is 54.

With respect to 120V MAX* – Based on using 2 DEWALT 60V MAX* li-ion batteries, combined having a maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) of 120 volts and a nominal voltage of 108.

AEM Reports: 3D Printing of Construction Equipment: 3 Things You Should Know  

3D Printing of Construction Equipment: 3 Things You Should Know  

 If you were at CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2017, you may have seen the unveiling of the world’s first 3D-printed excavator at the event’s inaugural Tech Experience.

It was more than just an attention-getter.

3D printing has slowly but surely developed into a disruptive technology poised to have far-reaching effects on the equipment industry.

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) was part of the team effort that developed that 3D-printed excavator.

AEM relays three things to keep in mind when looking at 3D printing and its potential for equipment manufacturing.

3D printing has enormous potential, but it is still growing and evolving.

The consensus right now among leading additive manufacturing experts is that the technology’s immediate potential can be most readily found in smaller-scale deployments, according to Dr. Lonnie Love, a corporate research fellow at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

“(3D printing) is not going to change all of manufacturing overnight,” says Love. “It’s not going to displace casting. It’s not going to displace welding.”

One key hurdle to adoption is that 3D printing is not yet fast enough, says Love.

“When you make these great parts at low volumes, you don’t care that it takes a week or a month… but we’ve got to go faster because it drives the productivity up and the costs down (for manufacturers).”

3D printing can help manufacturers do things they’ve never done before.

Love and his colleagues at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can attest to both the technology’s incredible capabilities and its value proposition for manufacturers.

They were involved in building the world’s first operational 3D-printed excavator unveiled at the Tech Experience at CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2017.

Known as Project AME (Additive Manufactured Excavator), the excavator was 3D printed using a variety of machines to create and assemble three components: a cab, a boom and a heat exchanger. The excavator’s boom was fabricated using a cutting-edge free-form additive manufacturing technique to print large-scale metal components.

It was an incredible undertaking, and the success of Project AME proved the sky’s really the limit in terms of what 3D-printing technology can do.

Play video of Project AME’s creation. Learn more about industry trends through AEM’s CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 initiative (https://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe/).

3D printing can help manufacturers create efficiencies and save money.

The costly and time-consuming process of tooling is a prime example of an opportunity for manufacturers to leverage 3D printing to create efficiencies.

According to Love, the production of molds, jigs, and fixtures used in the mass production of heavy equipment can take months, run six-figure costs and very often involve tooling companies based overseas. However, Love believes that the widespread adoption of additive manufacturing could change all that.

“This may be a mechanism to rapidly get tooling back in the U.S.,” Love says, “To make it take days and not months. It costs thousands instead of hundreds of thousands. We’ve already proven this on the automotive and aerospace sides. Now it’s time to take a look at construction and see where it fits.”

The equipment industry has earned a well-deserved reputation for designing and building machinery that stays in use for decades. But manufacturers spend heavily to keep massive inventories of spare parts on hand to meet customer needs.

According to Love, companies are now combating that challenge by cutting back on the overhead costs of warehouse space through 3D printing.

“The advantage of this technology is you could actually print a replacement part without having to have that inventory,” Love says. “That, to me, has tremendous potential.”

The Tech Experience returns to the next CONEXPO-AGG and IFPE, in 2020. Learn more about industry trends through AEM’s CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 initiative (https://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe

 

 

View photos of 3D excavator development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View photos of 3D excavator in action at CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2017

 

VOLVO CE MOVES INTO 3D PARTS PRINTING

Volvo Construction Equipment moves into a new dimension to assist customers in supplying spare parts and as part of its commitment to the research and development of new products.

A workshop tool for mounting parts on an axle has been made by 3D printing.

As the construction industry looks to new methods for efficient production, equipment manufacturers are likewise exploring additional ways to boost productivity. Volvo CE has introduced 3D printing in order to deliver spare parts to customers more quickly and efficiently. The company is also investing in 3D printing methods in the research and development of its prototype machinery.

“We are supporting customers through the life cycle of their equipment,” says Jasenko Lagumdzija, Manager of Business Support at Volvo CE. “It’s especially good for older machines where the parts that have worn out are no longer made efficiently in traditional production methods. Producing new parts by 3D printing cuts down on time and costs, so it’s an efficient way of helping customers.”

ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING BENEFITS CUSTOMERS

Additive manufacturing – as 3D printing is commonly known – is the process of repeatedly layering a molten material or liquid in a specific pattern that is set by the printer’s software, until it solidifies into the required three-dimensional shape. For its aftermarket service, Volvo CE commissions the creation of spare parts made of thermoplastics to send to customers who require the replacement of a part that has worn out through natural usage.
Parts can be made of any shape and size, and for any unit in Volvo CE’s range of off-road machinery. Typical parts made by 3D printing so far include parts of a cabin, plastic coverings, and sections of air conditioning units. The company uses its own archive of drawings, 3D models and product information to feed into the printer to produce the correct new part.
“The customer is getting exactly the same part in replacing plastic with plastic,” says Annika Fries, Aftermarket Branding Manager at Volvo CE. “We do a lot of quality assurance – the 3D parts have the same specifications and go through the same process as the original, and get the same warranty, so customers can be confident they are getting a genuine Volvo approved part.”

QUICK AND EFFICIENT RESPONSE

The creation of new parts via the 3D printing process can take as little as one week. Fast delivery of required components maximizes the uptime of customers’ equipment, and the ability to supply new parts to replace those that have gone out of normal production may also extend the lifetime of the machine as a whole. Parts made of metals through additive manufacturing may also be offered in future.
“Lead-times are significantly reduced with 3D printing and since there are no minimum order quantity requirements, we benefit from quicker delivery of parts, lower inventory levels in our warehouses and an improved ability to balance supply and demand,” says Daniel Kalfholm, Project Leader for Aftermarket Purchasing for Volvo CE’s EMEA region. “And it can all be carried out a purchase price that is comparable to that of a traditionally manufactured component.”

MOVING FORWARD WITH PROTOTYPING

In addition to 3D printing being an increasingly desirable element in the production of aftermarket parts, the process is also being used by Volvo CE in building new components for prototype machinery. The company has several 3D printers for this purpose at its research and development premises.
“As we only need to produce low volumes of parts for prototyping, it’s a good way to see what works,” says Fredrick Andersson, Development Engineer for Wheel Loaders Powertrain Installation at Volvo CE. “We have a lot of knowledge and we can make changes quickly and easily with 3D printing. And because of this, it means that the time to market for a new product is quicker, so it’s of great benefit to our company.”