Tag Archive for 'equipment'

3 Secrets to Hiring Top Construction Talent

Attend the education session “Top 10 Secrets to Successful Hiring” on Wednesday, March 11, 2020 from 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. at CONEXPO-CON/AGG.

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Top talent looks for career opportunities differently than they did a few years ago. This is largely attributable to technology. People have more access to information about job openings. There is also an increased level of employer transparency.

Websites like Indeed and Glassdoor have become quite influential. If you have a company with more than 100 employees, you’ll have an online presence whether you want one or not. Regardless of the size of your company, your online reputation has to be positive, which requires ongoing management. Some construction firms still don’t recognize this fact.

It’s also important to recognize the fact that traditional job postings aren’t as effective as they used to be. Studies have shown that job candidates often abandon the application process if it takes more than a few minutes. Part of that is because most postings are written from the employer’s point of view as opposed to the candidate’s, and we’re all moving at lightning speed today. The other part is that many employers fail to respond to job applicants in a timely fashion. As a result, people have been conditioned to distrust the traditional job posting and application process. Also, top performers no longer need to search job postings because industry connections contact them on a regular basis about solid career opportunities.

Construction firms can still attract top talent to their companies. They just need the right mindset and hiring process that accommodates today’s changes in candidate behavior.

We have assembled a list of top secrets to hiring top talent in the construction industry. Here’s a look at a few of them.

SECRET #1 – TREAT RECRUITING LIKE MARKETING AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Think about all of the planning and effort you put into client acquisition and retention. The same should be done for your employees. This takes commitment and consistency in doing the right things, such as proper outreach and follow-up, maintaining a strong brand and company culture, and creating career paths your employees and candidates can see. Finally, treat candidates exactly like prospective clients during your interview process.

SECRET #2 – BUILD A TALENT PIPELINE

It’s not enough to just put up a job posting or help wanted sign when you have a position to fill. Construction companies should be constantly building their talent pipeline.

To build a pipeline of future candidates for general labor or trades positions, it’s important to establish relationships with local high schools, technical schools and colleges. It’s also helpful to participate in workforce development programs in your area. In non-union areas, it is wise to consider an apprenticeship program.

With respect to office and management positions, there is competition for top talent. The first thing companies should do is “mine” the contacts of their employees. For example, ask your estimators to identify who they know to be good estimators. Collect their information and enter it into an applicant tracking system, or something simpler such as a Microsoft Outlook database or Excel spreadsheet.

After the list is developed, create some sort of communication mechanism, such as a quarterly company newsletter you can email to prospective employees. Let these people know what is going on with your company and the great projects you are working on. The goal is to keep it newsworthy while also creating some excitement around your company and culture.

Another good tactic is to connect with people on social media. For construction companies, Instagram and LinkedIn seem to be the most effective. A company Facebook page is also worth considering. Establish company pages that are regularly updated with newsworthy, engaging posts. Again, this takes commitment. But once you build up a community, you can start to post job openings that generate interest from top talent.

One other good tactic is to connect with your vendors, suppliers and consultants. They likely know people with the expertise you seek and can help you spread the word when you are looking for top talent.

SECRET #3 – CREATE BETTER JOB DESCRIPTIONS

When I speak to construction company leaders, I usually tell them to ditch the traditional job description. Most are fraught with “hiring bias” and prevent companies from attracting the best candidates for a given job.

For example, we had a client who was looking for a staff accountant to handle accounts payable, as well as prepare union payroll and reporting. The person writing the job description wanted to ask for at least three years of accounting experience, as well as an accounting degree from a top university. I immediately saw a disconnect.

I talked with the client about the most important performance outcomes of this position. The client cited the ability to meet deadlines, accurately enter information into the system, create accurate reports, and obtain the necessary approvals in a timely fashion. None of those essential performance outcomes really required three years of accounting experience, much less an accounting degree. So why did we want to limit our candidate pool to that? We could be missing out on some very detail-oriented people with great clerical and time-management skills.

I always advise clients to make a list of the top five or six performance outcomes a new hire must deliver in order to be successful. This is a road map to not only making a good hire, but attracting top performers to your company in the first place.

WANT TO LEARN MORE SECRETS TO SUCCESSFUL HIRING?

Be sure to attend my session at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020, North America’s largest construction trade show. It’s being held March 10-14 in Las Vegas. Visit CONEXPO/CON-AGG for more information.

Caterpillar Celebrates 90 Years on the New York Stock Exchange

Caterpillar Celebrates 90 Years on the New York Stock Exchange

Caterpillar Inc. Chairman and CEO Jim Umpleby will ring the opening bell today on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) to mark the 90th anniversary of the company’s listing on the NYSE, which is considered the world’s foremost securities marketplace. Of the approximately 2,200 companies listed on the NYSE, Caterpillar (NYSE: CAT) is among only three percent that have been consecutively listed for 90 years or more. 

“I am proud of our entire Caterpillar team. Every day, they create solutions to help our customers build a better world,” Umpleby said.

“Our team’s relentless focus on executing our strategy for profitable growth, including the advanced technologies that we are showcasing at the NYSE today, has given the company a strong balance sheet and the ability to return a significant part of our free cash flow to shareholders. Since 2017, we have repurchased about $7.1 billion in stock and paid about $3.5 billion in dividends.”

As part of the celebration, Caterpillar today is giving Wall Street traders the opportunity to handle an Advanced Construction Excavator Simulator System. Through a panel of video monitors and remote-control technology, traders will have the chance to take a turn at the excavator’s controls and attempt to dig virtual trenches, footings and more. There will also be a variety of Cat machines on display in front of the NYSE including a wheel loader, wheeled excavator, industrial loader and compact loader, all of which have played a part in Caterpillar’s historical success.

Listing on the NYSE is a globally recognized signal of corporate strength and leadership, reserved for companies that meet the NYSE’s stringent requirements for income, market capitalization, cash flow and ethical practice. 

Caterpillar Inc. – 90 Years on the New York Stock Exchange

  • An investor buying one share of Caterpillar Tractor Company at $56.25 in 1929 would have an investment worth about $70,000* today, accounting for share price growth, stock splits and dividends over the past 90 years. (*As calculated at close on December 2, 2019)
  • Caterpillar’s total shareholder return has sustained an annual compounded growth rate of 8 percent since the company listed in 1929.
  • On December 2, 1929, the first listing day, 1,882,240 shares were outstanding, and 400 shares of Caterpillar stock were traded. On December 2, 2019, there were more than 550 million shares outstanding, and about 3 million shares traded. 
  • Caterpillar was founded in 1925 and had its initial public offering in 1925 listed on the Pacific Stock Exchange (now NYSE Arca, Inc.). Our primary exchange listing on the NYSE began on December 2, 1929.

About Caterpillar:
For more than 90 years, Caterpillar Inc. has been making sustainable progress possible and driving positive change on every continent. Customers turn to Caterpillar to help them develop infrastructure, energy and natural resource assets. With 2018 sales and revenues of $54.722 billion, Caterpillar is the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives. The company principally operates through its three primary segments – Construction Industries, Resource Industries and Energy & Transportation – and also provides financing and related services through its Financial Products segment. For more information, visit caterpillar.com. To connect with us on social media, visit caterpillar.com/social-media

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS Certain statements in this press release relate to future events and expectations and are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “believe,” “estimate,” “will be,” “will,” “would,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “forecast,” “target,” “guide,” “project,” “intend,” “could,” “should” or other similar words or expressions often identify forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, statements regarding our outlook, projections, forecasts or trend descriptions. These statements do not guarantee future performance and speak only as of the date they are made, and we do not undertake to update our forward-looking statements.

Caterpillar’s actual results may differ materially from those described or implied in our forward-looking statements based on a number of factors, including, but not limited to: (i) global and regional economic conditions and economic conditions in the industries we serve; (ii) commodity price changes, material price increases, fluctuations in demand for our products or significant shortages of material; (iii) government monetary or fiscal policies; (iv) political and economic risks, commercial instability and events beyond our control in the countries in which we operate; (v) international trade policies and their impact on demand for our products and our competitive position, including the imposition of new tariffs or changes in existing tariff rates; (vi) our ability to develop, produce and market quality products that meet our customers’ needs; (vii) the impact of the highly competitive environment in which we operate on our sales and pricing; (viii) information technology security threats and computer crime; (ix) inventory management decisions and sourcing practices of our dealers and our OEM customers; (x) a failure to realize, or a delay in realizing, all of the anticipated benefits of our acquisitions, joint ventures or divestitures; (xi) union disputes or other employee relations issues; (xii) adverse effects of unexpected events including natural disasters; (xiii) disruptions or volatility in global financial markets limiting our sources of liquidity or the liquidity of our customers, dealers and suppliers; (xiv) failure to maintain our credit ratings and potential resulting increases to our cost of borrowing and adverse effects on our cost of funds, liquidity, competitive position and access to capital markets; (xv) our Financial Products segment’s risks associated with the financial services industry; (xvi) changes in interest rates or market liquidity conditions; (xvii) an increase in delinquencies, repossessions or net losses of Cat Financial’s customers; (xviii) currency fluctuations; (xix) our or Cat Financial’s compliance with financial and other restrictive covenants in debt agreements; (xx) increased pension plan funding obligations; (xxi) alleged or actual violations of trade or anti-corruption laws and regulations; (xxii) additional tax expense or exposure, including the impact of U.S. tax reform; (xxiii) significant legal proceedings, claims, lawsuits or government investigations; (xxiv) new regulations or changes in financial services regulations; (xxv) compliance with environmental laws and regulations; and (xxvi) other factors described in more detail in Caterpillar’s Forms 10-Q, 10-K and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Why Recruit Veterans

Beyond Workforce Development, Workforce Solutions

by Julie Davis,

Association of Equipment Manufacturers Director of Work Force Development.

Are you tired yet of pulling from the same employment pool? If the answer is yes, then you are ready to explore the new world of veteran recruitment. If you think that you’ve tried it, it doesn’t work for you or there is no one to recruit in your area, then you simply aren’t up to date. 

Why recruit Veterans?

Many companies find veterans to be more productive employees with lower turnover rates when compared to their nonveteran counterparts. Additionally, their past military background can give veterans distinctive capabilities and perspectives that can add insight and diversity to your team’s problem solving. Employers can also qualify for up to $10,000 in federal tax credits per veteran. 

There are multiple state and federal organizations that exist to connect employers with veterans. Many of them work with veterans before they leave active duty to ensure they have skills that can plug immediately into the workforce. Furthermore, just because you may not have a military base located near you is no longer a reason to exclude veterans from your search. Organizations looking to place veterans into employment include working to get veterans back to their home states if that is what they are looking for. Taking a few extra steps could mean providing a veteran the opportunity to truly come home.

Veteran Retainment

Approximately 40 percent of veterans leave their first job out of the military within a year of being hired. The transition can be challenging but there is some common sense, yet very real ways that you can position your company to retain your veterans. 

First, define what your motivation is to hire veterans. Then identify what skills, attitudes and experience would benefit your organization the most. (If you are not sure, simply find your best current employee in that position and identify their skills, attitudes and experiences.) 

Decide what a successful veteran hiring program for your organization looks like. Are you looking for just one or is this going to become a regular program? 

Identify the service branches, ranks and occupational specialties you might like to target. Don’t know? That’s okay because there’s multiple ways to connect. You could reach out to your state or local Veteran’ office and talk with someone or here are some great website you can connect with:

Understand the basics
https://content.iospress.com/articles/work/wor01987
(A brief introduction to military workplace culture)  
https://www.va.gov/VETSINWORKPLACE/docs/em_termsLingo.asp 
(Common Terms) 

Difference between the branches 
https://www.va.gov/VETSINWORKPLACE/mil_structure.asp

Difference between officer and enlisted ranks 
https://www.va.gov/VETSINWORKPLACE/docs/em_rank.asp

Civilian to Military Occupation Translator
https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/civilian-to-military-translator.aspx?frd=true

While building your veteran’s program, don’t forget to tap into your secret weapon – any veterans you are currently employing. Get their thoughts about skills and areas of service that might be a good fit. Don’t forget to ask them what about working for your organization might appeal to a veteran. After all, they have stayed with you! 

There are multiple employment organizations that will connect you with veterans. A few of my favorite include:

Hero’s MAKE America (Provides 10 weeks accelerated skills training for manufacturing)http://www.themanufacturinginstitute.org/Initiatives/Military-and-Veterans/Heroes-MAKE-America/Heroes-MAKE-America.aspx 

Hire a Hero
https://www.hireheroesusa.org/hire-a-veteran/ 

Bradley-Morris, Inc. (Specifically for Skilled Technicians)
https://www.bradley-morris.com/military-recruiting-firms/field-service-technician/

Orian Talent
https://www.oriontalent.com/military-job-seekers/enlisted-technicians/

Lastly, don’t forget that to retain your veteran, you may want to consider having some supports in place to make their transition smooth. Connect them to existing veterans in your workplace, let them know about opportunities for professional growth and advancement, and consider engaging current veterans in creating the program to ensure its effectiveness. 

Veterans who are coming out of service where they have worked with heavy equipment may be a perfect fit for the construction, agriculture, mining, utility or forestry industry sectors. Don’t let taking a few extra steps keep you from your next best hire.

Miller-Bradford & Risberg Supports Team Rubicon in Response to Severe Storm Damage in Northeast Wisconsin

CASE Construction Equipment dealer Miller-Bradford & Risberg supported Team Rubicon’s second wave of response to severe storms that originally hit the area in July 2019, including five tornadoes, that caused severe damage across Langlade and Oconto Counties in northeast Wisconsin.
The severe storms and tornadoes uprooted or snapped tens of thousands of trees, devastating wide swaths of forest land. Areas sustaining significant damage included recreational areas such as ATV and snowmobile trails that are important to the tourism economy in the area — especially throughout the winter. During the 10-day operation, 76 Team Rubicon volunteers worked to clear dozens of miles of recreational trails, many of which were completely unpassable.
On some trails, including the Crocker Hills Glacier Trail in Lily, Wisconsin, trees and limbs formed walls across the trail taller than 20 feet. To clear the trails, Team Rubicon sawyers partnered with heavy equipment teams that operated CASE compact track loaders and excavators provided by Miller-Bradford. As the sawyer teams would cut trees into movable sizes, the CASE CTLs and excavators pushed the debris to the side of the trail, making it passable and usable once again for ATVs and snowmobiles.
“We were keenly aware of the impacts that the storms and tornadoes had on the state and the communities that were hit,” said Dan Soley, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Miller-Bradford & Risberg. “We know the financial and long-term economic impacts that these natural disasters have on local communities – especially those dependent on tourism – so providing equipment for the clean-up efforts was our way of letting those people know that we have their backs.”

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According to estimates, hundreds of thousands of trees were downed during the mid-July storms, which produced winds of greater than 100 miles-per-hour.

For more information or to donate to Team Rubicon, visit TeamRubiconUSA.org. For more information on the partnership between CASE and Team Rubicon, visit CaseCE.com/TeamRubicon.

The 2020 HCEA Calendar is Available