Tag Archive for 'excavators'

TRIP Reports: Driving on deficient roads costs Colorado motorists a total of $6.8 billion annually

COLORADO TRANSPORTATION BY THE NUMBERS:

 Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility

Ten Key Transportation Numbers in Colorado

 

$6.8 billion

Driving on deficient roads costs Colorado motorists a total of $6.8 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.
$1,954 – Co. Springs

$2,162–Denver

$1,396 –Northern Colorado

$1,264-Grand Junction

$1,553 – Pueblo

TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional VOC, congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. Drivers in the state’s largest urban areas incur annual costs as a result of driving on deficient roads as follows: Colorado Springs, $1,954; Denver, $2,162; Northern Colorado, $1,396; Grand Junction, $1,264; and Pueblo, $1,553.
2,434

487

A total of 2,434 people were killed in Colorado traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015, an average of 487 fatalities annually.
 

22%

10th

20%

Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Colorado increased by 22 percent from 2000 to 2015 –from 41.8 billion VMT in 2000 to 51.1 billion VMT in 2015 – the tenth largest increase in the nation during that time. By 2030, vehicle travel in Colorado is projected to increase by another 20 percent.
2 1/2 X The fatality rate on Colorado’s rural roads is two-and-a-half times greater than the fatality rate on all other roads in the state (2.09 fatalities per 100 million VMT vs. 0.83).
 

41%

Forty-one percent of Colorado’s major urban roads are in poor condition. Forty-three percent are in mediocre or fair condition and the remaining 15 percent are in good condition.
$323 Billion Annually, $323 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Colorado, mostly by truck.
 

6%

Six percent of Colorado’s bridges are structurally deficient, meaning they have significant deterioration to the major components of the bridge.
Co. Springs: 35 hrs.

Denver: 49 hrs.

Northern Colorado:

17 hrs.

Grand Junction: 11 hrs.

Pueblo: 10 hrs.

Mounting congestion robs drivers of time and fuel. Annual time wasted in congestion for drivers in the state’s largest urban areas is as follows: Colorado Springs, 35 hours; Denver, 49 hours; Northern Colorado, 17 hours; Grand Junction, 11 hours; Pueblo, 10 hours.
 

$1.00 = $5.20

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Executive Summary

Nine years after the nation suffered a significant economic downturn, Colorado’s economy continues to rebound. The rate of economic growth in Colorado, which is greatly impacted by the reliability and condition of the state’s transportation system, has a significant impact on quality of life in the Centennial State.

An efficient, safe and well-maintained transportation system provides economic and social benefits by affording individuals access to employment, housing, healthcare, education, goods and services, recreation, entertainment, family, and social activities. It also provides businesses access to suppliers, markets and employees, all critical to a business’ level of productivity and ability to expand. Reduced accessibility and mobility – as a result of traffic congestion, a lack of adequate capacity, or deteriorated roads, highways, bridges and transit facilities – diminishes a region’s quality of life by reducing economic productivity and limiting opportunities for economic, health or social transactions and activities.

With an economy based largely on manufacturing, agriculture, natural resource extraction and tourism, the quality of Colorado’s transportation system plays a vital role in the state’s economic growth and quality of life.

In this report, TRIP looks at the top transportation numbers in Colorado as the state addresses modernizing and maintaining its system of roads, highways, bridges and transit.

COST TO COLORADO MOTORISTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

An inadequate transportation system costs Colorado motorists a total of $6.8 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • Driving on rough roads costs Colorado motorists a total of $2.3 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Traffic crashes in which roadway design was likely a contributing factor costs Colorado motorists a total of $1.6 billion each year in the form of lost household and workplace productivity, insurance and other financial costs.
  • Traffic congestion costs Colorado motorists a total of $2.9 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel.
  • The chart below details the average cost per driver in the state’s largest urban areas and statewide.

POPULATION, TRAVEL AND ECONOMIC TRENDS IN COLORADO

The rate of population and economic growth in Colorado has resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Colorado’s population reached approximately 5.5 million residents in 2015, a 27 increase since 2000 and the sixth largest increase in the nation during that time. Colorado had approximately 4 million licensed drivers in 2015.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Colorado increased by 22 percent from 2000 to 2015 –from 41.8 billion VMT in 2000 to 51.1 billion VMT in 2015 – the tenth largest increase in the nation during that time.
  • From 2000 to 2015, Colorado’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 32 percent, when adjusted for inflation. U.S. GDP increased 27 percent during this time.
  • During the first nine months of 2016, VMT in Colorado was up 3.2 percent from the first nine months of 2015, ahead of the national rate of VMT growth of three percent during that time.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Colorado is projected to increase by another 20 percent.

COLORADO ROAD CONDITIONS

A lack of adequate state and local funding has resulted in 41 percent of major urban roads and highways in Colorado having pavement surfaces in poor condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorists in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • The pavement data in this report, which is for all arterial and collector roads and highways, is provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), based on data submitted annually by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways.
  • Pavement data for Interstate highways and other principal arterials is collected for all system mileage, whereas pavement data for minor arterial and all collector roads and highways is based on sampling portions of roadways as prescribed by FHWA to insure that the data collected is adequate to provide an accurate assessment of pavement conditions on these roads and highways.
  • Forty-one percent of Colorado’s major locally and state-maintained urban roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, 43 percent are rated in mediocre or fair condition, and the remaining 15 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Twelve percent of Colorado’s major locally and state-maintained rural roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, 48 percent are rated in mediocre or fair condition, and the remaining 40 percent are rated in good condition.
  • The chart below details the share of pavement in poor, mediocre, fair and good condition in the state’s largest urban areas.

  • Roads rated in mediocre to poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes.       In some cases, these roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • Driving on rough roads costs Colorado motorists a total of $2.3 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

COLORADO BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Six percent of locally and state-maintained bridges in Colorado show significant deterioration. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Six percent of Colorado’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • The chart below details the share of structurally deficient bridges in Colorado Springs, Denver, Northern Colorado and statewide.

HIGHWAY SAFETY AND FATALITY RATES IN COLORADO

Improving safety features on Colorado’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • A total of 2,434 people were killed in Colorado traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015, an average of 487 fatalities per year.
  • Colorado’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.08 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2015 was lower than the national average of 1.13.
  • The fatality rate on Colorado’s non-interstate rural roads in 2015 was two-and-a-half times greater than on all other roads in the state (2.09 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.83).
  • The chart below details the average number of people killed in traffic crashes from 2013 to 2015 in the state’s largest urban areas, as well as the cost per motorist of traffic crashes.

  • Traffic crashes in Colorado imposed a total of $4.9 billion in economic costs in 2015. TRIP estimates that traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $1.6 billion in economic costs in 2015.
  • According to a 2015 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) report, the economic costs of traffic crashes includes work and household productivity losses, property damage, medical costs, rehabilitation costs, legal and court costs, congestion costs and emergency services.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over 20 years.

COLORADO TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Colorado, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

  • The chart below details the number of hours lost to congestion by the average driver in the state’s largest urban areas, as well as the annual cost of traffic congestion per driver in the form of lost time and wasted fuel.

  • Increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers and can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company when considering expansion or where to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for drivers and employees, and higher consumer costs.

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING IN COLORADO

Investment in Colorado’s roads, highways and bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. The five-year federal surface transportation program includes modest funding increases and provides states with greater funding certainty, but falls far short of providing the level of funding needed to meet the nation’s highway and transit needs. The bill does not include a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • According to the 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report, a significant boost in investment in the nation’s roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems is needed to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs.
  • AASHTO’s report found that based on an annual one percent increase in VMT annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges needs to increase 36 percent, from $88 billion to $120 billion, to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs,. Investment in the nation’s public transit system needs to increase from $17 billion to $43 billion.
  • The Bottom Line Report found that if the national rate of vehicle travel increased by 1.4 percent per year, the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 64 percent to $144 billion. If vehicle travel grows by 1.6 percent annually the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 77 percent to $156 billion.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN COLORADO

The efficiency of Colorado’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses rely on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $323 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Colorado, mostly by truck.
  • Seventy-five percent of the goods shipped annually to and from sites in Colorado are carried by trucks and another 21 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2015 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Sources of information for this report include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

JWH Equipment Supports Team Rubicon on Operation Iron Bird

Team Rubicon uses trained heavy equipment operators to demolish 17 houses and clear an additional 13 properties of debris created by an EF3 tornado that hit the region in January    

 

Veteran-led disaster relief organization Team Rubicon deployed its heavy equipment operators to Hattiesburg, Mississippi February 2-10, 2017 to assist in demolishing damaged houses and

From left to right, Team Rubicon Heavy Equipment Operators Patrick Smith, Brian Foy, Emiliano Sanchez and Victor Civitillo

clearing debris caused by the EF3 tornado that hit the city on January 21, 2017. CASE dealer JWH Equipment (Jackson, Mississippi) supplied an excavator and compact track loader for Team Rubicon’s http://Operation Iron Bird, which demolished 17 houses and cleared an additional 13 properties of tornado debris for free.

“Our goal while we’re out here as volunteers is to help as many people as we can, to get them to the point where they can rebuild their properties,” says Victor Civitillo, a certified heavy equipment instructor and operator with Team Rubicon who managed the heavy equipment deployment. “Having the CASE heavy equipment here means we can accomplish in two hours what would normally take a full day for a crew working with hand tools. So together we can help families get back on their feet faster, and then the whole community and the local economy recover faster.”

Operation Iron Bird is the most extensive heavy equipment deployment conducted by Team Rubicon in a disaster zone. The heavy equipment competency within the organization was created with training support from The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and equipment and training support through an ongoing partnership between CASE Construction Equipment and its dealers.

“Helping real people and communities rebuild with nothing but determination and a sense of service was what drew us to Team Rubicon and the work they do – this was a perfect execution of what this partnership was intended to be,” says Scott Harris, vice president – North America, CASE Construction Equipment. “JWH Equipment stepped up and saw an opportunity to help people in their own community, and we’re proud of the work all partners accomplished in Mississippi.”

Team Rubicon and CASE continue to work on additional heavy equipment operator training sessions throughout the U.S. For more on Team Rubicon, and to volunteer or donate, visit TeamRubiconUSA.org.

CASE Construction Equipment sells and supports a full line of construction equipment around the world, including the No. 1 backhoe loaders, excavators, motor graders, wheel loaders, vibratory compaction rollers, crawler dozers, skid steers, compact track loaders and rough-terrain forklifts. Through CASE dealers, customers have access to a true professional partner with world-class equipment and aftermarket support, industry-leading warranties and flexible financing. More information is available at www.CaseCE.com.

About Team Rubicon

Team Rubicon unites the skills and experiences of military veterans with first responders to rapidly deploy emergency response teams. Team Rubicon is a nonprofit organization offering veterans a chance to continue their service by helping and empowering those afflicted by disasters, and also themselves. Programs and services are made possible by the support of individual donors, corporate partners, and the dedication of volunteers across the country. To join or support Team Rubicon’s mission, visit http://www.TeamRubiconUSA.org.

Staying Ahead of the Competition – 7 Tips for Estimating & Bidding Earthmoving Jobs

Wells Fargo 2017 Economic Outlook

Managing Planned Maintenance Contracts With Telematics Systems