Tag Archive for 'excavators'

Changes in Volvo CE dealer network reflect the company’s strategy to meet customers’ needs

– Volvo Construction Equipment has made several changes to its dealer network over the last year, adding new dealers, and in some cases, expanding veteran dealers’ territories.

– The moves reflect the company’s strategy to outperform the competition in three key areas: providing the highest uptime values in the industry, offering unique solutions to customer business challenges and raising the lifecycle value of its machines.

Volvo Construction Equipment’s (Volvo CE) North American dealer network has seen a number of changes over the last year. Dealerships have changed hands, territories have expanded and new players have emerged on the scene to sell the company’s premium equipment and offer its services. The moves all help deliver customer value in three key areas: uptime, unique customer solutions and machine lifecycle value.

The new dealers that have become part of the Volvo CE network are all seasoned, veteran companies with extensive histories in their regions. They know their markets and customers well and are uniquely capable of helping Volvo CE achieve its strategic goals. Several of the dealers have shown prior success in selling Mack and Volvo Trucks, for example, while others have long been tied to Volvo CE, but are now offering sales of its equipment.

The new dealers include:
Housby Heavy Equipment, in Iowa

Wise Heavy Equipment, in Nebraska

TranSource Truck & Equipment, in South Dakota

Hawaii Truck Parts, Sales and Services, in Hawaii

Alta Equipment Company, expanding territory to Illinois

Stephen Roy, president of Volvo CE North America, said the company’s strategy is a result of extensive market research to learn just what customers want and need from the industry, and that these dealers are well-positioned to deliver on the company’s goals.

“When I came on board as president in 2017, I immediately set out to hear from customers across the Americas,” he explained. “Customers need more uptime from their machines. They also need more consulting from our experts to come up with unique solutions to their business problems. And they want higher residual values from their equipment partners. With these updates to our dealer network, we are positioning Volvo CE to compete — and win — the market in these areas.”

The times they are a-changing
The dealer network updates come at a crucial time for the industry when innovation and new technologies are set to permanently alter the sector. The new dealers have all pledged to align their strategic priorities with the company, embracing the focus on uptime, unique customer solutions and maintaining machine lifecycle values. They have joined the entire Volvo CE dealer network in undergoing intense training with Volvo CE and a variety of third-party experts to become equipped for these strategic goals, as well as the changing marketplace.

To win in uptime, for example, dealers need to become experts in areas such as telematics and predictive analytics. Dealers of the future could have “uptime managers” or other roles that support the industry’s shift toward outcome-based business models (such as generating efficiencies and ensuring all downtime is planned). Dealers will shift toward offering construction companies services that are more consultative, helping them manage costs, fleets, human resources, new technology and more.

Volvo CE dealers are already thinking this way. A significant portion of them are already highly engaged with ActiveCare Direct, and as new dealers come on board, they too will become experts in using the industry-unique telematics and remote monitoring system to increase uptime for their customers on their job sites. A recent, notable example is Flagler Construction Equipment’s use of the program on more than 70 machines for Florida’s I-4 Ultimate megaproject.

“We have ActiveCare Direct on all of the excavators being used on the project. It’s very important to us,” explained Tommy Ball, senior vice president of Flagler. “Volvo monitors ActiveCare and we also actively monitor it through our field service support center in Orlando. It really works out great for us — not only does it save us time, it saves the customer downtime.”

Similarly, Volvo CE is working with its entire dealer network on programs that offer unique solutions and boost machine lifecycle values, both of which the company will soon be announcing to the public. Until then, the focus remains on enhancing the capabilities of the company’s dealer network, with an eye toward helping them become the dealers of the future.

“It’s quite an exciting time to be a part of Volvo CE, and particularly to become one of our dealers,” Roy explained. “We aim to be a company that is easy to do business with, and that means making it easy to partner with us, but also it means that we have to equip our dealers for the future. New innovations, new ways to provide services and new market dynamics are all on the horizon, and Volvo CE is ensuring that our dealers will take the lead.”

AEM Reports: 3D Printing of Construction Equipment: 3 Things You Should Know  

3D Printing of Construction Equipment: 3 Things You Should Know  

 If you were at CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2017, you may have seen the unveiling of the world’s first 3D-printed excavator at the event’s inaugural Tech Experience.

It was more than just an attention-getter.

3D printing has slowly but surely developed into a disruptive technology poised to have far-reaching effects on the equipment industry.

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) was part of the team effort that developed that 3D-printed excavator.

AEM relays three things to keep in mind when looking at 3D printing and its potential for equipment manufacturing.

3D printing has enormous potential, but it is still growing and evolving.

The consensus right now among leading additive manufacturing experts is that the technology’s immediate potential can be most readily found in smaller-scale deployments, according to Dr. Lonnie Love, a corporate research fellow at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

“(3D printing) is not going to change all of manufacturing overnight,” says Love. “It’s not going to displace casting. It’s not going to displace welding.”

One key hurdle to adoption is that 3D printing is not yet fast enough, says Love.

“When you make these great parts at low volumes, you don’t care that it takes a week or a month… but we’ve got to go faster because it drives the productivity up and the costs down (for manufacturers).”

3D printing can help manufacturers do things they’ve never done before.

Love and his colleagues at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can attest to both the technology’s incredible capabilities and its value proposition for manufacturers.

They were involved in building the world’s first operational 3D-printed excavator unveiled at the Tech Experience at CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2017.

Known as Project AME (Additive Manufactured Excavator), the excavator was 3D printed using a variety of machines to create and assemble three components: a cab, a boom and a heat exchanger. The excavator’s boom was fabricated using a cutting-edge free-form additive manufacturing technique to print large-scale metal components.

It was an incredible undertaking, and the success of Project AME proved the sky’s really the limit in terms of what 3D-printing technology can do.

Play video of Project AME’s creation. Learn more about industry trends through AEM’s CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 initiative (https://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe/).

3D printing can help manufacturers create efficiencies and save money.

The costly and time-consuming process of tooling is a prime example of an opportunity for manufacturers to leverage 3D printing to create efficiencies.

According to Love, the production of molds, jigs, and fixtures used in the mass production of heavy equipment can take months, run six-figure costs and very often involve tooling companies based overseas. However, Love believes that the widespread adoption of additive manufacturing could change all that.

“This may be a mechanism to rapidly get tooling back in the U.S.,” Love says, “To make it take days and not months. It costs thousands instead of hundreds of thousands. We’ve already proven this on the automotive and aerospace sides. Now it’s time to take a look at construction and see where it fits.”

The equipment industry has earned a well-deserved reputation for designing and building machinery that stays in use for decades. But manufacturers spend heavily to keep massive inventories of spare parts on hand to meet customer needs.

According to Love, companies are now combating that challenge by cutting back on the overhead costs of warehouse space through 3D printing.

“The advantage of this technology is you could actually print a replacement part without having to have that inventory,” Love says. “That, to me, has tremendous potential.”

The Tech Experience returns to the next CONEXPO-AGG and IFPE, in 2020. Learn more about industry trends through AEM’s CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 initiative (https://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe

 

 

View photos of 3D excavator development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View photos of 3D excavator in action at CONEXPO-CON/AGG and IFPE 2017

 

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National Equipment Dealers, LLC Acquires Three Independent Equipment Dealers in Fastest Growing Regions in the USA

National Equipment Dealers, LLC Acquires Three Independent Equipment Dealers in Fastest Growing Regions in the USA

In a multi-faceted transaction that closed on Friday, January 5, National Equipment Dealers acquired Four Seasons Equipment, May Heavy Equipment, and Earthmovers Equipment, as well as some assets of International Iron.

This is a truly exceptional opportunity for NED to expand in what is recognized as the three fastest growing economic areas in the US: Texas (Houston and Dallas), the Carolinas (Raleigh, Lexington, Charlotte, Columbia, Greenville/Spartanburg, Charleston) and Florida (Orlando).

Financing for the merger and ongoing operations was supplied by a syndication of four banks led by BOK Financial. The other participating banks are Fifth Third Bank, Bank of the West and First Tennessee Bank.

Mitch Nevins, CEO, and Kerry Vickar, Chairman, state that employees of each company are expected to continue their respective jobs in the same previous manner as no operational changes will be made upon bringing these businesses together. They believe collective success will be realized by all employees working together, sharing best business practices and equipment fleets, and benefitting from the synergies of a larger company footprint.

Collectively NED represents 10 major manufacturers across a three-state territory, each embracing the combined operations in NED. It is expected that there will be a significant growth in size, both in terms of the number of locations and employees, as well as by geographic diversification, that will provide substantially enhanced opportunities for them as well as NED.