Tag Archive for 'Highway Bill'

Page 2 of 73

Wells Fargo Construction Quarterly Report

Wells Fargo Equipment Finance

From the corner office

John Crum, National Sales Manager
Wells Fargo Equipment Finance — Construction Group

Well into the second quarter of 2017, the industry is moving along at a very brisk pace. How brisk depends on the particular sector that your business is focused, but on the whole, sales trends are positive for most companies.

Read more about construction activity

 

Business sense

Peter Gregory, Senior Vice President and Group Leader,
Inventory Finance and Manufacturer Programs

I wrote an article last fall for our Construction Quarterly newsletter with some comments on the construction market’s recovery since the great recession. Nine months later, and with a new administration in place, we thought it might be a good opportunity to look back on where we saw things then and where we see them now, with a look forward over the next 9 to 12 months.

Read more about recession recovery

Customer spotlight

Rock Road, a customer of Wells Fargo Equipment Finance

Founded in 1913, by William James Kennedy and his brother, the company now known as Rock Road Companies, Inc., began with a wagon and a team of horses, rented out to haul commodities along developing railroads in Kentucky and Indiana. During the Great Depression, with a farm located in Footville, Wisconsin, the company evolved to being a sand and gravel provider for public works projects at the federal and state level, while also boarding workers at the farm.

Read more about the Rock Road and WFEF relationship

2017 Construction Industry Forecast

The 2017 Construction Industry Forecast report shows contractors and equipment distributors have a positive outlook for 2017. View the full report to find out when they expect construction activity — from equipment purchase intentions to rental trends — to pickup.

View the full report

TRIP Reports: Mississippi Motorists Lose $2.9 Billion Per Year On Roads That Are Rough, Congested & Lack Some Desirable Safety Features

Mississippi Motorists Lose $2.9 Billion Per Year On Roads That Are Rough, Congested & Lack Some Desirable Safety Features – As Much As $2,000 Per Driver. Costs Will Rise And Conditions Will Worsen Without Increased Funding

Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost Mississippi motorists a total of $2.9 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,046 per driver in some urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local and state levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Mississippi, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Mississippi Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Mississippi, nearly two-thirds of major locally and state-maintained urban roads are in poor or mediocre condition and 12 percent of Mississippi’s locally and state-maintained bridges are structurally deficient. The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year. And, more than 3,100 people were killed on the state’s roads from 2011 to 2015. Mississippi had the third highest traffic fatality rate in the nation in 2015.

Driving on Jackson area roads costs Mississippi drivers a total of $2.9 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which the lack of adequate roadway safety features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculates the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Hattiesburg, Jackson and Southaven-DeSoto County urban areas. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area along with a statewide total is below.

The TRIP report finds that 43 percent of Mississippi’s major locally and state-maintained urban roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 21 percent are rated in mediocre condition. Twelve percent of major urban roads are in fair condition and the remaining 24 percent are rated in good condition. Driving on deficient roads costs Mississippi motorists an additional $1.4 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

“Municipalities in Mississippi are responsible for more than 23,000 street miles,” said Jimmy Clyde, mayor of Magee and president of the Mississippi Municipal League.  “As a mayor, I can confirm that one of most requested services from my citizens is better and safer streets. More than half of Mississippi citizens live in municipalities, and they expect and deserve safe, well-maintained streets. The cost of providing and maintaining streets and bridges continues to outpace current municipal revenue streams.  Raising property taxes should not be the only recoursefor generating new revenue. If cities and towns can improve their street infrastructure, the climate for economic development will continue to improve and more jobs can be created for all Mississippians.”

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Mississippi, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion costs Mississippi drivers $530 annually in the form of lost time and wasted fuel.

Twelve percent of Mississippi’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components.

Traffic crashes in Mississippi claimed the lives of 3,109 people between 2011 and 2015, an average of 622 fatalities per year. Mississippi’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.70 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is significantly higher than the national average of 1.13 and the third highest rate in the nation. The state’s rural roads have a traffic fatality rate that is more than four times the fatality rate on all other roads in the state.

The efficiency and condition of Mississippi’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $277 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Mississippi, mostly by truck. Seventy-seven percent of the goods shipped annually to and from sites in Mississippi are carried by trucks and another eight percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.

“The condition of Mississippi’s transportation system will worsen in the future without additional funding, leading to even higher costs for drivers,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “In order to promote economic growth, foster quality of life and get drivers safety and efficiently to their destination, Mississippi will need to make transportation funding a top priority.”

Ten Key Transportation Numbers in Mississippi

 

$2.9 billion

Driving on deficient roads costs Mississippi motorists a total of $2.9 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula – $1,267

Hattiesburg – $1,293

Jackson – $2,046

Southaven-DeSoto County- $1,870

TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional VOC, congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. Drivers in the state’s largest urban areas incur annual costs as a result of driving on deficient roads as follows: Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula – $1,267; Hattiesburg- $1,293; Jackson – $2,046, Southaven-DeSoto County- $1,870.
 

2 of 3 miles

Nearly two of every three miles of Mississippi’s major urban roads are in either poor or mediocre condition, with 43 percent rated in poor condition and 21 percent rated in mediocre condition.
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula – 41%

Hattiesburg – 51%

Jackson – 63%

Southaven-DeSoto County-44%

The share of major urban roads in poor or mediocre condition in the state’s largest urban areas is as follows: Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, 41 percent; Hattiesburg, 51 percent; Jackson, 63 percent; and Southaven-DeSoto County 44 percent.
 

4X

The fatality rate on Mississippi’s rural roads is more than four times the fatality rate on all other roads in the state (2.93 fatalities per 100 million VMT vs. 0.70).
12%

2,098 bridges

Twelve percent of Mississippi’s bridges (2,098 out of 17,068) are structurally deficient, the 12th highest rate in the nation. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.
3rd Mississippi’s traffic fatality rate of 1.70 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is the third highest in the nation.
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula – 19 hours

Hattiesburg – 13 hours

Jackson – 38 hours

Southaven-DeSoto County-43 hours

Increasing congestion, particularly in the state’s urban areas, is causing significant delays for residents and businesses. The average Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula driver loses 19 hours annually to congestion, Hattiesburg drivers lose 13 hours each year, Jackson drivers lose 38 hours, and Southaven-DeSoto County drivers lose 43 hours.
$1 = $4 to $5 Every $1 of deferred maintenance on roads and bridges has been found to cost an additional $4 to $5 in needed future repairs.
 

$1.00 = $5.20

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

MISSISSIPPI TRANSPORTATION BY THE NUMBERS:

Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility
Executive Summary

Quality of life and economic progress are riding on Mississippi’s transportation system. The rate of economic growth in Mississippi, which is greatly impacted by the reliability and condition of the state’s transportation system, has a significant impact on quality of life in the Magnolia State.

An efficient, safe and well-maintained transportation system provides economic and social benefits by affording individuals access to employment, housing, healthcare, education, goods and services, recreation, entertainment, family, and social activities. It also provides businesses access to suppliers, markets and employees, all critical to a business’ level of productivity and ability to expand. Reduced accessibility and mobility – as a result of traffic congestion, a lack of adequate capacity, or deteriorated roads, highways, bridges and transit facilities – diminishes a region’s quality of life by reducing economic productivity and limiting opportunities for economic, health or social transactions and activities.

With an economy based largely on agriculture, tourism and manufacturing, the quality of Mississippi’s transportation system plays a vital role in the state’s economic growth and quality of life.

In this report, TRIP looks at the top transportation numbers in Mississippi as the state addresses modernizing and maintaining its system of roads, highways, bridges and transit.

COST TO MISSISSIPPI MOTORISTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

An inadequate transportation system costs Mississippi motorists a total of $2.9 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • Driving on rough roads costs Mississippi motorists a total of $1.4 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Traffic crashes in which roadway design was likely a contributing factor cost Mississippi motorists a total of $1 billion each year in the form of lost household and workplace productivity, insurance and other financial costs.
  • Traffic congestion costs Mississippi motorists a total of $530 million each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel.
  • The chart below details the average cost per driver in the state’s largest urban areas and statewide.

POPULATION, TRAVEL AND ECONOMIC TRENDS IN MISSISSIPPI

Population and economic growth result in increased demands on major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Mississippi’s population reached approximately 3 million residents in 2016, a five percent increase since 2000. Mississippi had approximately 2 million licensed drivers in 2015.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Mississippi increased by 19 percent from 2000 to 2016 –from 35.5 billion VMT in 2000 to 42.3 billion VMT in 2016. VMT in the state increased nine percent just in the last three years (2013-2016).
  • From 2000 to 2015, Mississippi’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 14 percent, when adjusted for inflation. U.S. GDP increased 27 percent during this time.

MISSISSIPPI ROAD CONDITIONS

A lack of adequate state and local funding has resulted in nearly two of every three miles of major urban roads and highways in Mississippi having pavement surfaces in poor or mediocre condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorists in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • The pavement data in this report, which is for all arterial and collector roads and highways, is provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), based on data submitted annually by the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways.
  • Pavement data for Interstate highways and other principal arterials is collected for all system mileage, whereas pavement data for minor arterial and all collector roads and highways is based on sampling portions of roadways as prescribed by FHWA to insure that the data collected is adequate to provide an accurate assessment of pavement conditions on these roads and highways.
  • Overall, 28 percent of Mississippi’s major locally and state-maintained roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 27 percent are in mediocre condition. Fifteen percent of the state’s major roads are rated in fair condition and the remaining 30 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Forty-three percent of Mississippi’s major locally and state-maintained urban roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 21 percent are rated in mediocre condition. Twelve percent of major urban roads are in fair condition and the remaining 24 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Twenty-five percent of Mississippi’s major locally and state-maintained rural roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 28 percent are rated in mediocre condition. Fifteen percent of major rural roads are in fair condition and the remaining 32 percent are rated in good condition.
  • The chart below details the share of pavement in poor, mediocre, fair and good condition in the state’s largest urban areas.

  • Roads rated in mediocre to poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes. In some cases, these roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • Driving on rough roads costs Mississippi motorists a total of $1.4 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Long-term repair costs increase significantly when road and bridge maintenance is deferred, as road and bridge deterioration accelerates later in the service life of a transportation facility and requires more costly repairs. A report on maintaining pavements found that every $1 of deferred maintenance on roads and bridges costs an additional $4 to $5 in needed future repairs.

MISSISSIPPI BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Twelve percent of locally and state-maintained bridges in Mississippi show significant deterioration. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Twelve percent of Mississippi’s bridges (2,098 out of 17,068) are structurally deficient, the twelfth highest share in the nation. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles. 
  • The chart below details the share of structurally deficient bridges in the state’s largest urban areas.

HIGHWAY SAFETY AND FATALITY RATES IN MISSISSIPPI

Improving safety features on Mississippi’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • A total of 3,109 people were killed in Mississippi traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015, an average of 622 fatalities per year.
  • Mississippi’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.70 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2015 was significantly higher than the national average of 1.13 and the third highest rate in the nation.
  • The fatality rate on Mississippi’s non-interstate rural roads in 2015 was more than four times that on all other roads in the state (2.93 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.70).
  • The chart below details the average number of people killed in traffic crashes from 2013 to 2015 in the state’s largest urban areas, as well as the cost per motorist of traffic crashes.

  • Traffic crashes in Mississippi imposed a total of $3.1 billion in economic costs in 2015. TRIP estimates that traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $1 billion in economic costs in 2015.
  • According to a 2015 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) report, the economic costs of traffic crashes includes work and household productivity losses, property damage, medical costs, rehabilitation costs, legal and court costs, congestion costs and emergency services.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over 20 years.

MISSISSIPPI TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Mississippi, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

  • Based on Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) estimates, the value of lost time and wasted fuel in Mississippi is approximately $530 million per year.
  • The chart below details the number of hours lost to congestion by the average driver in the state’s largest urban areas, as well as the annual cost of traffic congestion per driver in the form of lost time and wasted fuel.

  • Increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers and can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company when considering expansion or where to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for drivers and employees, and higher consumer costs.

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING IN MISSISSIPPI

Investment in Mississippi’s roads, highways and bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. The current five-year federal surface transportation program includes modest funding increases and provides states with greater funding certainty, but falls far short of providing the level of funding needed to meet the nation’s highway and transit needs. The bill does not include a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • According to the 2015 Status of the Nation’s Highways, Bridges and Transit: Conditions and Performance report submitted by the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) to Congress, the nation faces an $836 billion backlog in needed repairs and improvements to the nation’s roads, highways and bridges.
  • The USDOT report found that the nation’s current $105 billion investment in roads, highways and bridges by all levels of government should be increased by 35 percent to $142.5 billion annually to improve the conditions of roads, highways and bridges, relieve traffic congestion and improve traffic safety.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MISSISSIPPI

The efficiency of Mississippi’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses rely on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $277 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Mississippi, mostly by truck.
  • Seventy-seven percent of the goods shipped annually to and from sites in Mississippi are carried by trucks and another eight percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2015 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Sources of information for this report include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

 

 

 

ARTBA Reports: Federal Highway Administration Backtracks on Obama-Era “Greenhouse Gas” Tracking Measure

The Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) May 19 decision to suspend a controversial Obama Administration proposal requiring the tracking of “greenhouse gas” (GHG) emissions from transportation improvements will help save taxpayer dollars and prevent those projects from additional unnecessary delays, the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) says.

The proposal was part of larger performance measures required under the July 2012 “Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century” (MAP-21) surface transportation law. ARTBA had previously argued the measure exceeded “both the authority of the FHWA and the intent of MAP-21.”

The association first raised objections to the measure back in August 2016 comments, noting that neither Congress nor the administration sought emission measurements in the MAP-21 performance management process, and that such a proposal was subsequently not included in the “Fixing America’s Surface Transportation” (FAST) Act reauthorization law passed in December 2015.

ARTBA then followed up the comments by meeting with House and Senate staff, as well as Office of Management and Budget (OMB) officials, to express its concerns.  The association also convened a group of nearly 40 trade associations on a letter to FHWA stating, “The simple fact is that MAP-21 was approved with broad bipartisan majorities in the House and Senate and the inclusion of an unrelated GHG proposal violates this bipartisan spirit.  It is hard to see this proposal as anything other than a maneuver to achieve a policy objective the prior administration failed to advance in the appropriate legislative arena.”

On a related note, ARTBA also warned the agency not to exceed its authority three years ago, when it urged the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) not to jeopardize the broad bipartisan congressional support for MAP-21 by including extraneous issues—such as climate change— in the law’s implementation. Specifically, a 2013 ARTBA task force cautioned:

“Focus on the goals enumerated in the law. The authors of MAP-21 had the opportunity to include a host of external goals such as livability, reduction of transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions, reduction of reliance on foreign oil, adaptation to the effects of climate change, public health, housing, land-use patterns and air quality in the planning and performance process….the U.S. Department of Transportation should focus on implementing the goals and standards as spelled out in MAP-21.”
Established in 1902 and headquartered by Capitol Hill, ARTBA represents the U.S. transportation construction industry before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, the courts and news media.

TRIP Report: Connecticut Motorists Lose $6.1 Billion Per Year On Roads That Are Rough, Congested & Lack Some Safety Features

Connecticut Motorists Lose $6.1 Billion Per Year On Roads That Are Rough, Congested & Lack Some Safety Features – Up To $2,378 Per Driver. Costs Will Rise And Conditions Will Worsen Without Increased Funding

Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost Connecticut motorists a total of $6.1 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,378 per driver in some urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local and state levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Connecticut, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Connecticut Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Connecticut, nearly four-fifths of major, locally and state-maintained roads are in poor or mediocre condition and eight percent of Connecticut’s locally and state-maintained bridges are structurally deficient. The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year. And, more than 1,200 people were killed on the state’s roads from 2011 to 2015.

Driving deficient Connecticut roads costs the state’s drivers $6.1 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which the lack of adequate roadway safety features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculates the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Bridgeport-Stamford, Hartford and New Haven urban areas. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area along with a statewide total is below.

Overall, 57 percent of Connecticut’s major locally and state-maintained roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 22 percent are in mediocre condition. Ten percent of the state’s major roads are rated in fair condition and the remaining 11 percent are rated in good condition. Driving on deteriorated roads costs Connecticut drivers an additional $2.2 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

“A generation ago, shortsighted and sporadic decisions were made that grossly underfunded our infrastructure and crippled our current transportation system,” said Representative Chris Perone, chief transportation financial officer for Connecticut House Democrats. “A strong economy is fueled by an efficient transportation system and making that happen needs to remain a priority.”

Traffic congestion in the state’s largest urban areas is worsening, causing as much as 49 annual hours of delay for some motorists and costing drivers as much as $1,174 annually in lost time and wasted fuel.

“Our roads and bridges are decaying and the money in the state’s Special Transportation Fund (STF) is drying up. We are standing on the precipice of tragedy,” said Representative Tony Guerrera, house chair of the Connecticut Legislature’s Transportation Committee. “According to the TRIP report, a majority of our roads are in poor or mediocre condition. With electronic tolls we could have a dedicated revenue stream to lock away in the STF and ensure funding for our roads and bridges for decades to come.”

Eight percent of Connecticut’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components.

Traffic crashes in Connecticut claimed the lives of 1,246 people between 2011 and 2015, an average of 249 fatalities per year. While Connecticut’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is lower than the national average of 1.13, the state’s rural roads have a traffic fatality rate that is nearly double the fatality rate on all other roads in the state.

The efficiency and condition of Connecticut’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $489 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Connecticut, mostly by truck. Eighty-six percent of the goods shipped annually to and from sites in Connecticut are carried by trucks and another 11 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.

“The condition of Connecticut’s transportation system will worsen in the future without additional funding, leading to even higher costs for drivers,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “In order to promote economic growth, foster quality of life and get drivers safety and efficiently to their destination, Connecticut will need to make transportation funding a top priority.”

CONNECTICUT TRANSPORTATION BY THE NUMBERS:

Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility

Ten Key Transportation Numbers in Connecticut

 

$6.1 billion

Driving on deficient roads costs Connecticut motorists a total of $6.1 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.
Bridgeport-Stamford – $2,378

Hartford – $2,355

New Haven – $2,190

TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional VOC, congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. Drivers in the state’s largest urban areas incur annual costs as a result of driving on deficient roads as follows: Bridgeport-Stamford – $2,378; Hartford- $2,355; New Haven – $2,190.
 

4 of 5 miles

Nearly four of five miles of Connecticut’s major roads are in either poor or mediocre condition, with 57 percent rated in poor condition and 22 percent rated in mediocre condition.
Bridgeport-Stamford – 49 hours

Hartford – 45 hours

New Haven – 40 hours

Mounting congestion robs drivers of time and fuel. Annual time wasted in congestion for drivers in the state’s largest urban areas is as follows: Bridgeport-Stamford, 49 hours; Hartford, 45 hours; and, New Haven, 40 hours.
2X The fatality rate on Connecticut’s rural roads is nearly double the fatality rate on all other roads in the state (1.45 fatalities per 100 million VMT vs. 0.79).
8%

338 bridges

Eight percent of Connecticut’s bridges (338 out of 4,214) are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.
$489 Annually, $489 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Connecticut, mostly by truck.
 

$4.4 Billion

$1.5 Billion

Traffic crashes in Connecticut imposed a total of $4.4 billion in economic costs in 2015. TRIP estimates that traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $1.5 billion in economic costs in 2015.
$1 = $4 to $5 Every $1 of deferred maintenance on roads and bridges has been found to cost an additional $4 to $5 in needed future repairs.
 

$1.00 = $5.20

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Executive Summary

Quality of life and economic progress are literally riding on Connecticut’s transportation system. The rate of economic growth in Connecticut, which is greatly impacted by the reliability and condition of the state’s transportation system, has a significant impact on quality of life in the Constitution State.

An efficient, safe and well-maintained transportation system provides economic and social benefits by affording individuals access to employment, housing, healthcare, education, goods and services, recreation, entertainment, family, and social activities. It also provides businesses access to suppliers, markets and employees, all critical to a business’ level of productivity and ability to expand. Reduced accessibility and mobility – as a result of traffic congestion, a lack of adequate capacity, or deteriorated roads, highways, bridges and transit facilities – diminishes a region’s quality of life by reducing economic productivity and limiting opportunities for economic, health or social transactions and activities.

With an economy based largely on business and financial services, tourism, manufacturing, and agriculture, the quality of Connecticut’s transportation system plays a vital role in the state’s economic growth and quality of life.

In this report, TRIP looks at the top transportation numbers in Connecticut as the state addresses modernizing and maintaining its system of roads, highways, bridges and transit.

COST TO CONNECTICUT MOTORISTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

An inadequate transportation system costs Connecticut motorists a total of $6.1 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • Driving on rough roads costs Connecticut motorists a total of $2.2 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Traffic crashes in which roadway design was likely a contributing factor cost Connecticut motorists a total of $1.5 billion each year in the form of lost household and workplace productivity, insurance and other financial costs.
  • Traffic congestion costs Connecticut motorists a total of $2.4 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. 
  • The chart below details the average cost per driver in the state’s largest urban areas and statewide.

POPULATION, TRAVEL AND ECONOMIC TRENDS IN CONNECTICUT

Population and economic growth in Connecticut have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Connecticut’s population reached approximately 3.6 million residents in 2016, a five percent increase since 2000. Connecticut had approximately 2.6 million licensed drivers in 2015.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Connecticut increased by four percent from 2000 to 2016 –from 30.8 billion VMT in 2000 to 32 billion VMT in 2016. VMT in the state increased three percent just in the last three years (2013-2016).
  • From 2000 to 2015, Connecticut’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 11 percent, when adjusted for inflation. U.S. GDP increased 27 percent during this time.

CONNECTICUT ROAD CONDITIONS

A lack of adequate state and local funding has resulted in four of five miles of major roads and highways in Connecticut having pavement surfaces in poor or mediocre condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorists in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • The pavement data in this report, which is for all arterial and collector roads and highways, is provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), based on data submitted annually by the Connecticut Department of Transportation (CTDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways.
  • Pavement data for Interstate highways and other principal arterials is collected for all system mileage, whereas pavement data for minor arterial and all collector roads and highways is based on sampling portions of roadways as prescribed by FHWA to insure that the data collected is adequate to provide an accurate assessment of pavement conditions on these roads and highways.
  • Overall, 57 percent of Connecticut’s major locally and state-maintained roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 22 percent are in mediocre condition. Ten percent of the state’s major roads are rated in fair condition and the remaining 11 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Sixty-one percent of Connecticut’s major locally and state-maintained urban roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 19 percent are rated in mediocre condition. Nine percent of major urban roads are in fair condition and the remaining 11 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Thirty-nine percent of Connecticut’s major locally and state-maintained rural roads and highways have pavements in poor condition and 34 percent are rated in mediocre condition. Seventeen percent of major rural roads are in fair condition and the remaining 11 percent are rated in good condition.
  • The chart below details the share of pavement in poor, mediocre, fair and good condition in the state’s largest urban areas.

  • Roads rated in mediocre to poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes.       In some cases, these roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • Driving on rough roads costs Connecticut motorists a total of $2.2 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Long-term repair costs increase significantly when road and bridge maintenance is deferred, as road and bridge deterioration accelerates later in the service life of a transportation facility and requires more costly repairs. A report on maintaining pavements found that every $1 of deferred maintenance on roads and bridges costs an additional $4 to $5 in needed future repairs.

CONNECTICUT BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Eight percent of locally and state-maintained bridges in Connecticut show significant deterioration. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Eight percent of Connecticut’s bridges (338 out of 4,214) are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • The chart below details the share of structurally deficient bridges in the Bridgeport-Stamford, Hartford and New Haven areas.

HIGHWAY SAFETY AND FATALITY RATES IN CONNECTICUT

Improving safety features on Connecticut’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • A total of 1,246 people were killed in Connecticut traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015, an average of 249 fatalities per year.
  • Connecticut’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2015 was lower than the national average of 1.13.
  • The fatality rate on Connecticut’s non-interstate rural roads in 2015 was nearly double that on all other roads in the state (1.45 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.79).
  • The chart below details the average number of people killed in traffic crashes from 2013 to 2015 in the state’s largest urban areas, as well as the cost per motorist of traffic crashes.

  • Traffic crashes in Connecticut imposed a total of $4.4 billion in economic costs in 2015. TRIP estimates that traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $1.5 billion in economic costs in 2015.
  • According to a 2015 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) report, the economic costs of traffic crashes includes work and household productivity losses, property damage, medical costs, rehabilitation costs, legal and court costs, congestion costs and emergency services.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over 20 years.

 CONNECTICUT TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Connecticut, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

  • Based on Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) estimates, the value of lost time and wasted fuel in Connecticut is approximately $2.4 billion per year.
  • The chart below details the number of hours lost to congestion by the average driver in the state’s largest urban areas, as well as the annual cost of traffic congestion per driver in the form of lost time and wasted fuel.

 

  • Increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers and can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company when considering expansion or where to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for drivers and employees, and higher consumer costs.

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING IN CONNECTICUT

Investment in Connecticut’s roads, highways and bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. The current five-year federal surface transportation program includes modest funding increases and provides states with greater funding certainty, but falls far short of providing the level of funding needed to meet the nation’s highway and transit needs. The bill does not include a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • According to the 2015 Status of the Nation’s Highways, Bridges and Transit: Conditions and Performance report submitted by the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) to Congress, the nation faces an $836 billion backlog in needed repairs and improvements to the nation’s roads, highways and bridges.
  • The USDOT report found that the nation’s current $105 billion investment in roads, highways and bridges by all levels of government should be increased by 35 percent to $142.5 billion annually to improve the conditions of roads, highways and bridges, relieve traffic congestion and improve traffic safety.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN CONNECTICUT

The efficiency of Connecticut’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses rely on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $489 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Connecticut, mostly by truck.
  • Eighty-six percent of the goods shipped annually to and from sites in Connecticut are carried by trucks and another 11 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2015 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Sources of information for this report include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

 

 

ARTBA & NAPA Endorse Transportation Project Safety Certification Program

 

ARTBA–NAPA Partnership Features Joint Development of Online Asphalt Paving-Milling Safety Training Courses

The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) today endorsed the Safety Certification for Transportation Project Professionals (SCTPP) program and plans to urge its member firms and their employees to earn the credential beginning this year.

Launched in late 2016 and administered by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s Transportation Development Foundation (ARTBA-TDF), the SCTTP’s vision is to “ensure the safety and well-being of construction workers, motorists, truck drivers, pedestrians and cyclists and their families by making transportation project sites world-wide zero safety incident zones.”

As part of a strategic partnership, ARTBA and NAPA will jointly develop and implement online asphalt paving-/milling-specific safety training modules that industry professionals can use to prepare for the certification exam or to earn Professional Development Hours and build their skill sets. NAPA will also help recruit asphalt paving/milling professionals to join the SCTPP “Subject Matter Experts” team that plays a critical role in developing exam questions.

“We are excited to partner with ARTBA to develop and promote training tools that will aid companies in implementing best practices proven to help eliminate work zone incidents,” said NAPA President Mike Acott. “Because of the unique nature of asphalt road construction work, there was a clear need for asphalt paving-/milling-specific modules within the SCTPP.  We look forward to working with ARTBA and our nationally recognized experts to create the modules needed to address safe work zone and asphalt road construction practices.”

“The goal with the certification program is to help cause a demonstrable reduction in the number of deaths and injuries that occur on and around transportation project sites each year,” ARTBA President Pete Ruane said. “Our partnership with NAPA moves us closer toward that goal because it allows us to reach a wider audience of key decision makers who are in the position to improve jobsite safety.”

The SCTPP program is aimed at the thousands of transportation project workers, supervisors, foremen, inspectors, managers, manufacturers and materials suppliers, designers, equipment operators and owners who could make a huge, industry-wide safety impact by learning core competencies necessary to identify and mitigate potentially life-threatening on-site risks.

The two-and-a-half hour exam contains up to 120 multiple-choice questions that probe knowledge in: assessing project risks; creating project safety plans; implementing and conducting on-going evaluation of a site-specific operational safety plan; and conducting incident investigations. It’s designed to meet the rigorous protocols required for accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization ISO/IEC 17024: “Conformity Assessment: “General Requirements for Bodies Operating Certification of Persons.”

An independent, nine-member Certification Commission established the program’s governing and operational policies, and provides on-going oversight. It is co-chaired by national safety advocates, David Walls, president & CEO of Austin Industries, based in Dallas, Texas; and Ross Myers, chairman & CEO of Allan Myers, based in Worcester, Pennsylvania. Top leaders from the transportation project planning, design and materials sectors, government, organized labor, and the trucking and insurance industries also serve as commissioners.

Additional information about the certification program can be found on its comprehensive website: www.puttingsafetyfirst.org.