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TRIP: New Report Examines Progress And Challenges In Improving Maryland’s Transportation System

TRIP: New Report Examines Progress And Challenges In Improving Maryland’s Transportation System, Identifies States Largest Bottlenecks, Evaluates Current Road And Bridge Conditions And Safety, And Notes Recent Mobility Improvements

A new report recently released by TRIP assesses recent improvements undertaken to enhance mobility in Maryland, identifies the state’s top 30 traffic bottlenecks, and evaluates road and bridge conditions and highway safety. While a 2013 state transportation funding boost and the 2015 approval of a long-term federal surface transportation program have resulted in a significant increase in state transportation investment, Maryland still faces a significant challenge in improving mobility, conditions and safety, and supporting long-term economic growth. TRIP is a Washington, DC-based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Keeping Maryland Mobile: Progress and Challenges in Providing an Efficient, Safe and Well-Maintained Transportation System,” finds that throughout Maryland, state-maintained road conditions have improved since 2012 and the number of structurally deficient state-maintained bridges has decreased during that time. While traffic congestion continues to increase, the state has made progress in completing needed projects to improve the efficiency of its transportation system.

Largely due to increased revenue as a result of the Transportation Infrastructure Investment Act of 2013, the average annual highway investment in Maryland by the State Highway Administration increased by 85 percent from an average of $810 million annually from 2010 to 2012 to an average of $1.5 billion annually from 2016 to 2018. As a result, the share of state-maintained roads and highways in Maryland in poor or mediocre condition decreased from 30 percent in 2012 (13 percent rated poor and 17 percent rated in mediocre condition) to 24 percent in 2014 (10 percent rated poor and 14 percent rated in mediocre condition). Similarly, the number of state-maintained bridges in Maryland rated structurally deficient was reduced from 97 in 2012 to 69 in 2015.

Maryland has completed a number of congestion relief projects since 2013, including construction of the final section of the Intercounty Connector (ICC), construction of two toll-lanes on eight miles of I-95 from I-895 to MD 43, widening I-70 to six lanes at South Street/Monocacy Boulevard, widening several sections of US 40, and widening and reconstruction of I-695/Wilkens Avenue. Additional mobility improvements completed in Maryland since 2013 include expanded service patrols on major highways, enhanced driver information, improved traffic signal timing, and construction of 11 miles of new sidewalks and 13 miles of marked bicycle lanes.

“From Governor Hogan’s $2 billion investment in highways and bridges to innovative projects and practical design, Maryland is committed to improving safety and reducing hours lost every day to congestion,” said Maryland Secretary of Transportation Pete K. Rahn.

Despite efforts to improve the efficiency of Maryland’s transportation system, congestion on Maryland’s roads results in 195 million hours of delays annually and the consumption of 85 million additional gallons of fuel, resulting in an annual cost of $4.1 billion in lost time and wasted fuel. Two of the nation’s 25 most congested urban areas are located in or include parts of Maryland. The Washington, DC metro area, which includes suburbs in Maryland and Virginia, is ranked first nationally in the cost of traffic congestion per commuter, with congestion costing $1,834 per commuter and causing 82 hours of delay annually. The Baltimore urban area ranked 25th in the cost of traffic congestion per commuter at $1,115, with the average Baltimore motorist losing 47 hours annually.

The TRIP report identifies Maryland’s top 30 bottleneck locations, with the top ten bottlenecks detailed below. A full list of the top 30 bottlenecks throughout the state can be found in the report.

MD 1Nearly a quarter of Maryland’s locally and state-maintained bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Six percent of Maryland’s locally and state-maintained bridges are structurally deficient, meaning there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Seventeen percent of locally and state-maintained bridges are functionally obsolete, meaning they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

“Despite overwhelming support for choices in meeting our transportation needs, some groups would deny us this choice by aggressively opposing even the most reasonable roadway projects as part of a multi-modal transportation system,” said Tom Calcagni, director of public and government affairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic. “That is why the success stories we have heard today, as well the successes of the Wilson Bridge, Mixing Bowl, ICC and other impactful projects, are so important.  They show that investments in roadways and bridges can and do make a difference.”

Traffic crashes in Maryland claimed the lives of 2,404 people between 2010 and 2014. Maryland’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.78 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is lower than the national average of 1.08. Maryland’s non-Interstate rural roads have a traffic fatality rate of 1.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel, approximately three times higher than the fatality rate of 0.61 on all other roads.

The efficiency and condition of Maryland’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $445 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Maryland with 75 percent of the freight tonnage being shipped by trucks.

“While Maryland has been able to use increased state transportation funds to improve road and bridge conditions in recent years, congestion continues to mount and a significant amount of additional local, state and federal funding is still needed,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without additional transportation funding, Maryland’s transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and congested, the state will miss out on opportunities for economic growth, and quality of life will suffer.”

KEEPING MARYLAND MOBILE:

Progress and Challenges in Providing an Efficient, Safe and

Well-Maintained Transportation System

Executive Summary

Eight years after the nation suffered a significant economic downturn, Maryland’s economy continues to rebound. The rate of economic growth in Maryland, which will be greatly impacted by the reliability and condition of the state’s transportation system, continues to have a significant impact on quality of life in the Free State.

An efficient, safe and well-maintained transportation system provides economic and social benefits by affording individuals access to employment, housing, healthcare, education, goods and services, recreation, entertainment, family, and social activities. It also provides businesses with access to suppliers, markets and employees, all critical to a business’ level of productivity and ability to expand. Reduced accessibility and mobility – as a result of traffic congestion, a lack of adequate capacity, or deteriorated roads, highways, bridges and transit facilities – diminishes a region’s quality of life by reducing economic productivity and limiting opportunities for economic, health or social transactions and activities.

With the state’s population and employment continuing to grow, Maryland must continue to improve its transportation system to foster economic growth and keep and attract business. In addition to economic growth, transportation improvements are needed to ensure safe, reliable mobility. Meeting Maryland’s need to further modernize its transportation system will require significant local, state and federal funding.

Maryland has undertaken a sustained commitment to upgrade the condition and efficiency of its roads, highways, bridges, transit systems and pedestrian and bicycling facilities. The Maryland General Assembly’s approval of the Transportation Infrastructure Investment Act of 2013 has allowed the state to significantly boost its investment in Maryland’s transportation system.

In December 2015 the president signed into law a long-term federal surface transportation program that includes modest funding increases and allows state and local governments to plan and finance projects with greater certainty through 2020.

This significant boost in state transportation funding, as well as the modest increase in federal surface transportation funding, is supporting increased investment in road, highway and bridge repairs in Maryland and allowing the state to move forward with numerous projects to expand the capacity and/or efficient operations of its transportation system. This increase in transportation capacity and efficient operations will further economic development opportunities and improve quality of life.

Population and economic growth have placed increased demands on Maryland’s major roads and highways, leading to mounting wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • From 2000 to 2015, Maryland’s population increased by 13 percent, from approximately 5.3 million residents to approximately 6 million.
  • Maryland’s population is projected to increase to approximately 6.9 million in 2040, with the state expected to add an additional 800,000 jobs between 2010 and 2040.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Maryland increased 12 percent from 2000 to 2014 – from 50.1 billion VMT in 2000 to 56.4 billion VMT in 2014.
  • Vehicle miles of travel in Maryland in 2015 were 2 percent higher than in 2014.
  • From 2000 to 2014, Maryland’s gross state product (GSP), a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 31 percent, when adjusted for inflation.
  • Based on population and other lifestyle trends, TRIP estimates that travel on Maryland’s roads and highways will increase by another 20 percent by 2030.

Traffic congestion places a significant burden on Marylanders, including lost time, reduced economic productivity and wasted fuel. Maryland’s roadways are among the most congested in the nation.

  • Congestion on Maryland’s roads and highways results in 195 million hours of delay annually and the consumption of an extra 85 million gallons of fuel, resulting in an annual cost in lost time and wasted fuel of $4.1 billion.
  • The share of Maryland’s freeways and expressways that experience heavy to severe congestion is increasing. In 2014, 16 percent of the state’s freeways and expressways experienced heavy to severe congestion during the morning peak commuting hours while 24 percent experienced heavy to severe congestion during the afternoon peak commuting hours. This is up from 16 and 22 percent, respectively, in 2013.
  • Two of the nation’s 25 most congested urban areas are located in or include parts of Maryland. The Washington, DC metro area, which includes suburbs in Maryland and Virginia, is ranked first nationally in the cost of traffic congestion per commuter, with congestion costing $1,834 per commuter and causing 82 hours of delay annually. The Baltimore urban area ranked 25th in the cost of traffic congestion per commuter at $1,115, with the average Baltimore motorist losing 47 hours annually.
  • The Maryland State Highway Administration identified the top 30 traffic bottleneck locations in Maryland in 2014 by ranking segments of roadway based on the duration, intensity, frequency and average queue length of congestion. The following chart details the top 30 roadway bottlenecks in Maryland in 2014.

MD 2Since the Maryland General Assembly’s passage of the Transportation Infrastructure Investment Act of 2013 the state has been able to increase investment in repairing roads, highways and bridges and move forward with numerous transportation projects to improve mobility in Maryland.  

  • Since passage of the Transportation Infrastructure Investment Act of 2013, the average annual highway investment in Maryland by the State Highway Administration increased by 85 percent from an average of $810 million annually from 2010 to 2012 to an average of $1.5 billion annually from 2016 to 2018.
  • The share of state-maintained roads and highways in Maryland in poor or mediocre condition decreased from 30 percent in 2012 (13 percent rated poor and 17 percent rated in mediocre condition) to 24 percent in 2014 (10 percent rated poor and 14 percent rated in mediocre condition).
  • The number of state-maintained bridges in Maryland rated structurally deficient has been reduced from 97 in 2012 to 69 in 2015.
  • Since 2013, Maryland has been able to complete a number of highway projects to increase the capacity of many of the state’s most heavily traveled routes. The following table provides information on some of the key congestion relief projects completed in Maryland since 2013.
  • MD 3Maryland has also made significant progress since 2013 in improving the efficiency of its transportation system and expanding facilities for non-motorized transportation. These mobility improvements include:
  • Expanding the state’s highway service patrols serving the Baltimore, Washington, Frederick and Annapolis areas to 24 hours a day seven days a week in 2014, which resulted in the patrols responding to 23,000 incidents and assisting nearly 37,000 stranded motorists in 2014.
  • Improving driver information services, including upgrading the state’s 511 traveler information service and expanding the state’s travel time information, with nearly 100 message signs in operation throughout the state.
  • Improving signal timing on 225 traffic signals.
  • Installing 11 miles of new sidewalks and 13 miles of marked bicycle lanes.

Nearly a quarter – 23 percent — of locally and state-maintained bridges in Maryland show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment with the adjoining roadway.

  • Six percent of Maryland’s locally and state-maintained bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • A bridge is considered structurally deficient if: 1) any of its significant load carrying elements are found to be in a poor condition due to deterioration and/or damage; 2) it has a low weight restriction; or 3) the adequacy of the waterway opening provided by the bridge is determined to be extremely insufficient to the point that roadway flooding causes intolerable traffic interruptions.
  • Seventeen percent of Maryland’s locally and state-maintained bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Improving safety features on the state’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in traffic fatalities and serious crashes.

  • Between 2010 and 2014, 2,404 people were killed in traffic crashes in Maryland, an average of 481 fatalities per year.
  • Maryland’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.78 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2014 is lower than the national average of 1.08.
  • The traffic fatality rate on Maryland’s non-Interstate rural roads in 2014 was approximately three times higher than on all other roads and highways in the state – 1.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel compared to 0.61, compared to a national average of 2.14 and 0.77, respectively.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

The efficiency of Maryland’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the state’s economy. Businesses are increasingly reliant on an efficient and reliable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $445 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Maryland, with 75 percent of the freight tonnage being shipped by trucks.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2013 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

According to a 2012 national report, improved access as a result of capacity expansions provides numerous regional economic benefits. Those benefits include higher employment rates, higher land value, additional tax revenue, increased intensity of economic activity, increased land prices and additional construction as a result of the intensified use.

  • The projects analyzed in the report were completed no later than 2005 and included a wide variety of urban and rural projects, including the expansion or addition of major highways, beltways, connectors, bypasses, bridges, interchanges, industrial access roads, intermodal freight terminals and intermodal passenger terminals.
  • The expanded capacity provided by the projects resulted in improved access, which resulted in reduced travel-related costs, faster and more reliable travel, greater travel speeds, improved reliability, and increased travel volume.
  • The report found that improved transportation access benefits a region by: enhancing the desirability of an area for living, working or recreating, thus increasing its land value; increasing building construction in a region due to increased desirability for homes and businesses; increasing employment as a result of increased private and commercial land use; and increasing tax revenue as a result of increased property taxes, increased employment and increased consumption, which increases sales tax collection.
  • The report found that benefits of a transportation capacity expansion unfolded over several years and that the extent of the benefits were impacted by other factors including: the presence of complementary infrastructure such as water, sewer and telecommunications; local land use policy; the local economic and business climate; and whether the expanded capacity was integrated with other public investment and development efforts.
  • For every $1 million spent on urban highway or intermodal expansion, the report estimated that an average of 7.2 local, long-term jobs were created at nearby locations as a result of improved access. An additional 4.4 jobs were created outside the local area, including businesses that supplied local businesses or otherwise benefited from the increased regional economic activity.
  • For every $1 million spent on rural highway or intermodal expansion, the report estimated that an average of 2.9 local, long-term jobs were created at nearby locations as a result of improved access. An additional 1.6 jobs were created outside the local area, including businesses that supplied local businesses or otherwise benefited from the increased regional economic activity.
  • The report found that highway and intermodal capacity projects in urban areas created a greater number of long-term jobs than in rural areas, largely due to the more robust economic environment and greater density in urban communities.

The recently approved five-year federal surface transportation program includes modest funding increases and provides states with greater funding certainty, but falls far short of providing the level of funding needed to meet the nation’s highway and transit needs. The bill does not include a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • According to the 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report a significant boost in investment in the nation’s roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems is needed to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs.
  • AASHTO’s report found that annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges needs to increase 36 percent, from $88 billion to $120 billion, to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs, based on an annual one percent rate of vehicle travel growth. Investment in the nation’s public transit system needs to increase from $17 billion to $43 billion.
  • AASHTO’s Bottom Line Report found that if the national rate of vehicle travel increased by 1.4 percent per year, the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 64 percent to $144 billion. If vehicle travel grows by 1.6 percent annually the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 77 percent to $156 billion.

Sources of information for this report include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U. S. Census Bureau, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO),the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). All data used in the report are the most recent available.

Trip Report Identifies 125 California Transportation Projects Needed To Support Economic Growth

TRIPTrip Report Identifies 125 California Transportation Projects Needed To Support Economic Growth,But Many Face A Funding “Red” Or “Yellow” Light; State Needs To Complete Critical Transportation Projects To Improve Highway And Transit Network

Forty-two of the 125 transportation improvements identified by TRIP as being the most needed in California have Trip Report Identifies 125 California Transportation Projects Needed To Support Economic Growth, received a red light because they are unfunded and 69 of the projects have earned a yellow light because they only have partial funding available, jeopardizing the region’s future quality of life due to an inadequate transportation system.   These transportation projects would support the state’s future development by improving access, safety and conditions according to a new report released recently by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

TRIP rated each needed transportation improvement as either having a green light, a yellow light or a red light in terms of the availability of funding, with a green light indicating that adequate funding was available. The report finds that more than one-third of the 125 most needed transportation projects in California have earned a red light because funding is not currently available and, under current funding, is not anticipated to be available through 2020. More than half of needed transportation projects in the state have earned a yellow light because only a portion of needed funding is anticipated to be available by 2020 or the funding is uncertain. Only 14 of the state’s most needed transportation projects have a green light, to signify that full funding is likely to be available or is anticipated to be available by 2020.

“The TRIP Report highlighting important unfunded transportation projects in the San Francisco Bay area underscores the vital need for legislative action on a transportation revenue package to support a growing population and a robust economy,” said Will Kempton, executive director of Transportation California.

TRIP has identified needed projects in the Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco urban areas, as well as projects outside those urban areas. The transportation improvements outside the state’s largest urban areas, as determined by TRIP, which are the most needed to support quality of life and development goals, and their funding status are listed in the following table. Information on projects can be found in the report’s appendices: Appendix A – Los Angeles, Appendix B – San Diego, Appendix C – San Francisco, Appendix D – Sacramento and Appendix E – projects outside largest urban areas .

CA1

The TRIP report also found that California continues to experience significant growth, with the state’s population increasing by 16 percent since 2000 to 39 million, Gross State Product increasing by 27 percent since 2000, when adjusted for inflation, and statewide vehicle miles of travel increasing by 5.3 percent from 2014 to 2015. More than half – 51 percent – of major urban roads in California have pavements in poor condition, eight percent of bridges in California are rated structurally deficient and the traffic fatality rate on California’s rural non-interstate roadways is nearly four-and-a-half times higher than on all other roads and highways in the state, the report found.

Turning the red and yellow lights, which many of the region’s most critically needed transportation improvements currently face, to green lights, will require increased transportation investment at the local, state and federal levels.

Signed into law in December 2015, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, provides modest increases in federal highway and transit spending available to states, allows states greater long-term funding certainty and streamlines the federal project approval process. But the FAST Act does not provide adequate funding to meet the nation’s need for highway and transit improvements and does not include a long-term and sustainable funding source.

“Giving a green light to critically needed transportation projects in the Los Angeles area and throughout the state is going to require increased funding from all levels of government,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Unfortunately, too many of these transportation projects are facing yellow or red lights and potential state funding cuts could slow their progress even more.”
To review the entire TRIP California report or the various segments visit http://www.tripnet.org

Or scan:
TRIPCA qrcode-98

TRIP Report: Deficient, Congested Roadways Cost Wisconsin Drivers $2,072 Annually, $6 Billion Statewide

Deficient, Congested Roadways Cost Wisconsin Drivers As Much As $2,072 Annually, A Total Of $6 Billion Statewide. Costs Will Rise And Transportation Woes Will Worsen Without Increased Funding

 Roads and bridges that are deficient, congested or lack desirable safety features cost Wisconsin motorists a total of $6 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,072 per driver in the state’s larger urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Wisconsin, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Wisconsin Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Wisconsin, 42 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads are in mediocre to poor condition and another 39 percent are in fair condition. Fourteen percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year. And 2,743 people were killed annually in crashes on Wisconsin’s roads from 2011 to 2015, with traffic fatalities increasing 13 percent in 2015 to 556 from 494 in 2014.

Driving on deficient roads costs each Milwaukee area driver $2,060 per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. Drivers in the Madison urban lose an average of $2,072 annually as a result of driving on deficient roads. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area along with a statewide total is below.

WI 1The TRIP report finds that 56 percent of major roads in the Milwaukee urban area are in poor to mediocre condition, costing the average motorist an additional $861 each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear. Sixty-eight percent of major roads in Madison are in poor to mediocre condition, costing each driver $974 each year.

“An efficient transportation infrastructure with adequate capacity is the circulatory system of a healthy economy,” said Steve Baas, senior vice president for governmental affairs and public policy at the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce (MMAC).   “Road congestion throughout our region clogs the arteries of commerce and threatens the life and health of our business climate.”

Traffic congestion in the Milwaukee area is worsening, causing 38 hours of delay a year for the average motorist and costing each driver $987 annually in lost time and wasted fuel. The average Madison driver loses 36 hours annually as a result of congestion, while the annual cost of lost time and wasted fuel for each Madison driver is $911.

A total of 14 percent of Wisconsin’s bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Nine percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional five percent of the state’s bridges are functionally obsolete, which means they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. In the Milwaukee urban area, six percent of bridges are structurally deficient and 24 percent are functionally obsolete. Nine percent of Madison area bridges are structurally deficient, while nine percent are functionally obsolete.

Wisconsin’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is lower than the national average of 1.08. The state’s rural roads have a traffic fatality rate that is more than double than the rate on all other roads in the state (1.24 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel versus 0.54). TRIP estimates that roadway features may be a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.

The efficiency and condition of Wisconsin’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $264 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Wisconsin and another $236 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Wisconsin, mostly by truck.

“These conditions are only going to get worse if greater funding is not made available at the local, state and federal levels,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without additional transportation funding Wisconsin transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and congested, the state will miss WI_TRIP_Infographics_May_2016out on opportunities for economic growth and quality of life will suffer.”

WISCONSIN TRANSPORTATION

BY THE NUMBERS:

Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and

Efficient Mobility

Ten Key Transportation Numbers in Wisconsin

 

$6 billion

Driving on deficient roads costs Wisconsin motorists a total of $6 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.
 

Madison: $2,072 Milwaukee: $2,060

 

TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in Wisconsin’s largest urban areas in the form of additional VOC, congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. The average Madison area driver loses $2,072 annually, while each Milwaukee area driver loses $2,060.
2,743

13 %

62

A total of 2,743 people were killed in Wisconsin traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015. The number of traffic fatalities increased by approximately 13 percent between 2014 and 2015, increasing by 62 deaths from 494 to 556.
2 X The fatality rate on Wisconsin’s non-interstate rural roads is more than double that on all other roads in the state (1.24 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.54).
42% Statewide

68% Madison

56% Milwaukee

Statewide, 42 percent of Wisconsin’s major roads are in mediocre to poor condition. Sixty-eight percent of major roads in the Madison urban area are in mediocre to poor condition, while in the Milwaukee urban area 56 percent of major roads are in mediocre to poor condition.
$264 B

$236 B

Annually, $264 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Wisconsin and another $236 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Wisconsin, mostly by truck.
 

14%

A total of 14 percent of Wisconsin bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards. Nine percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient and five percent are functionally obsolete.
36 hours

38 hours

 

The average driver in the Madison area loses 36 hours to congestion annually, while each driver in the Milwaukee urban area loses 38 hours annually.
 

$274

33

A recent analysis by WisDOT found that the average Wisconsin motorists pays $274 annually in state and local registration-related fees and gas taxes, a level ranked 33rd nationally among states.
 

 

1,393,428

$54.8 B

$10 B

1,393,428 full-time jobs in Wisconsin in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation infrastructure network. These workers earn $54.8 billion in wages and contribute an estimated $10 billion in state and local income, corporate and unemployment insurance taxes and the federal payroll tax.

 

 

Eight years after the nation suffered a significant economic downturn, Wisconsin’s economy continues to rebound. The rate of economic growth in Wisconsin, which will be greatly impacted by the reliability and condition of the state’s transportation system, continues to have a significant impact on quality of life in the Badger State.

An efficient, safe and well-maintained transportation system provides economic and social benefits by affording individuals access to employment, housing, healthcare, education, goods and services, recreation, entertainment, family, and social activities. It also provides businesses with access to suppliers, markets and employees, all critical to a business’ level of productivity and ability to expand. Reduced accessibility and mobility – as a result of traffic congestion, a lack of adequate capacity, or deteriorated roads, highways, bridges and transit facilities – diminishes a region’s quality of life by reducing economic productivity and limiting opportunities for economic, health or social transactions and activities.

With an economy based largely on agriculture, food, paper and beverage production, manufacturing, health care, education and tourism, the quality of Wisconsin’s transportation system plays a vital role in the state’s economic growth and quality of life.

In this report, TRIP looks at the top transportation numbers in Wisconsin as the state addresses its need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways, bridges and transit.

In December 2015 the president signed into law a long-term federal surface transportation program that includes modest funding increases and allows state and local governments to plan and finance projects with greater certainty through 2020. The Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act) provides approximately $305 billion for surface transportation with highway and transit funding slated to increase by approximately 15 and 18 percent, respectively, over the five-year duration of the program. While the modest funding increase and certainty provided by the FAST Act are a step in the right direction, the funding falls far short of the level needed to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs and fails to deliver a

COST TO WISCONSIN MOTORISTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

An inadequate transportation system costs Wisconsin motorists a total of $6 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • TRIP estimates that Wisconsin roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have deteriorated pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $6 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear), the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.
  • TRIP has calculated the average cost to drivers in the state’s largest urban areas as a result of driving on roads that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features. The chart below details the costs to drivers statewide and in the Madison and Milwaukee urban areas.

WI 2POPULATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN WISCONSIN

The rate of population and economic growth in Wisconsin have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Wisconsin’s population reached approximately 5.8 million residents in 2015, an eight percent increase since 2000.
  • Wisconsin had 4.2 million licensed drivers in 2014.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Wisconsin increased by five percent from 2000 to 2014 –from 57.3 billion VMT in 2000 to 60.1 billion VMT in 2014.
  • Vehicle miles of travel in Wisconsin in 2015 were 4.2 percent higher than in 2014. U.S. vehicle miles of travel in 2015 were 3.5 percent higher than in 2014.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Wisconsin is projected to increase by another 25 percent.
  • From 2000 to 2014, Wisconsin’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 18 percent, when adjusted for inflation. U.S. GDP increased 24 percent during this time.

WISCONSIN ROAD CONDITIONS

A lack of adequate state and local funding has resulted in more than two-fifths of major locally and state-maintained roads and highways in Wisconsin having pavement surfaces in mediocre to poor condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorists in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • The pavement data in this report, which is for all arterial and collector roads and highways, is provided by the Federal Highway Administration, based on data submitted annually by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways in the state.
  • Pavement data for Interstate highways and other principal arterials is collected for all system mileage, whereas pavement data for minor arterial and all collector roads and highways is based on sampling portions of roadways as prescribed by FHWA to insure that the data collected is adequate to provide an accurate assessment of pavement conditions on these roads and highways.
  • Statewide, 42 percent of Wisconsin’s major locally and state-maintained roads and highways are in mediocre to poor condition, while 39 percent are in fair condition and 19 percent are in good to excellent condition.
  • Roads rated in mediocre to poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes. In some cases, these roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • The chart below details pavement conditions on major locally and state-maintained urban roads in the Madison and Milwaukee urban areas:
  • WI 3Driving on rough roads costs Wisconsin motorists a total of $3.2 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. The average driver in the Madison urban area loses $974 annually, while in the Milwaukee urban area the average driver loses $861 each year as a result of driving on deteriorated roads. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

WISCONSIN BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Fourteen percent of locally and state-maintained bridges in Wisconsin show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Nine percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Five percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • The chart below details bridge conditions statewide and in the Madison and Milwaukee urban areas:

WI 4HIGHWAY SAFETY AND FATALITY RATES IN WISCONSIN

Improving safety features on Wisconsin’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • A total of 2,743 people were killed in Wisconsin traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015.
  • The number of traffic fatalities in Wisconsin increased by approximately 13 percent between 2014 and 2015, increasing by 62 deaths from 494 to 556.
  • Wisconsin’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2014 was lower than the national average of 1.08.
  • The fatality rate on Wisconsin’s non-interstate rural roads in 2014 was more than double that on all other roads in the state (1.24 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.54).
  • The chart below details the average number of fatalities from 2012 to 2014 in the Madison and Milwaukee areas, and the average cost per driver as a result of traffic crashes.
  • WI 5Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

WISCONSIN TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Wisconsin, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

  • Based on Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) estimates, the value of lost time and wasted fuel in Wisconsin is approximately $1.7 billion per year.
  • According to TTI, the average driver in the Madison urban area loses $911 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion. The average Madison commuter wastes 36 hours each year stuck in traffic.
  • According to TTI, the average driver in the Milwaukee urban area loses $987 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion. The average Milwaukee commuter wastes 38 hours each year stuck in traffic.
  • Increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers and can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company when considering expansion or where to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for drivers and employees, and higher consumer costs.

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING IN WISCONSIN

Investment in Wisconsin’s roads, highways and bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. The recently approved five-year federal surface transportation program includes modest funding increases and provides states with greater funding certainty, but falls far short of providing the level of funding needed to meet the nation’s highway and transit needs. The bill does not include a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • According to the 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report, a significant boost in investment in the nation’s roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems is needed to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs.
  • AASHTO’s report found that based on an annual one percent increase in VMT annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges needs to increase 36 percent, from $88 billion to $120 billion, to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs, based on an annual one percent rate of vehicle travel growth. Investment in the nation’s public transit system needs to increase from $17 billion to $43 billion.
  • The Bottom Line Report found that if the national rate of vehicle travel increased by 1.4 percent per year, the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 64 percent to $144 billion. If vehicle travel grows by 1.6 percent annually the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 77 percent to $156 billion.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN WISCONSIN

The efficiency of Wisconsin’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses rely on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • 1,393,428 full-time jobs in Wisconsin in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation infrastructure network. These workers earn $54.8 billion in wages and contribute an estimated $10 billion in state and local income, corporate and unemployment insurance taxes and the federal payroll tax.
  • Annually, $264 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Wisconsin and another $236 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Wisconsin, mostly by truck.
  • Eighty-two percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Wisconsin are carried by trucks and another 14 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2015 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Sources of information for this report include the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTS

ABC Reports: Nonresidential Spending Slip in February No Cause for Alarm

NRNonresidential construction spending dipped in February, falling 1.4 percent on a monthly basis according to analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). Spending in the nonresidential sector totaled $690.3 billion on a seasonally adjusted, annualized basis in February. While this represents a step back from January’s figure of $700.3 billion (revised down from $701.9 billion), it is still 1.5 percent higher than the level of spending registered in December 2015 and 10.1 percent higher than February 2015.

“February’s weather was particularly harsh in certain parts of the country, including in the economic activity-rich Mid-Atlantic region, and that appears to have had an undue effect on construction spending data,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.  “February data are always difficult to interpret, and the latest nonresidential construction spending figures are no different. Seasonal factors have also made state-level data very difficult to interpret.

“Beyond meteorological considerations, there are other reasons not to be alarmed by February’s decline in nonresidential construction spending,” said Basu. ”Today’s positive construction employment report indicates continued economic growth. Moreover, much of the decline in volume was attributable to manufacturing, but the ISM manufacturing index recently crossed the threshold 50 level, indicating that domestic manufacturing is now expanding for the first time in seven months.”

Eight of the sixteen nonresidential subsectors experienced spending decreases in February, though almost half of the total decline in spending is attributable to the 5.9 percent decline in manufacturing-related spending.

The following 16 nonresidential construction sectors experienced spending increases in February on a monthly basis:

  • Spending in the amusement and recreation category climbed 0.4 percent from January and is up 13.7 percent from February 2015.
  • Lodging-related spending is up 0.4 percent for the month and is up 30.1 percent on a year-ago basis.
  • Water supply-related spending expanded 1.9 percent on a monthly basis and 3.2 percent on a yearly basis.
  • Spending in the office category grew 3.8 percent from January and is up 25.3 percent on a year-ago basis.
  • Transportation-related spending expanded 0.5 percent month-over-month and 5.8 percent year-over-year.
  • Health care-related spending expanded 2 percent from January and is up 3.3 percent from February 2015.
  • Public safety-related spending is up 1.8 percent for the month, but is down 5.3 percent for the year.
  • Commercial-related construction spending inched 0.1 percent higher for the month and grew 11 percent for the year.

Spending in eight of the nonresidential construction subsectors fell in February on a monthly basis:

  • Educational-related construction spending fell 2.4 percent from January, but has expanded 8.5 percent on a yearly basis.
  • Communication-related spending fell 15 percent month-over-month, but expanded 11.8 percent year-over-year.
  • Spending in the highway and street category fell 2 percent from January, but is 24.5 higher than one year ago.
  • Sewage and waste disposal-related spending fell 2.4 percent for the month, but is up 2.3 percent for the year.
  • Conservation and development-related spending is 4.6 percent lower on a monthly basis and 16.8 percent lower on a year-over-year basis.
  • Spending in the religious category fell 4 percent for the month and is up just 0.7 percent for the year.
  • Manufacturing-related spending fell 5.9 percent on a monthly basis and is up only 0.8 percent on a yearly basis.

Spending in the power category fell 0.6 percent from January, but is 4.8 percent higher than one year ago.

Spending_4_1_16

Mississippi Local Technical Assistance Program March 28, 2016

MS LTAP TRAINING March 28th
The location for this training is MDOT Administration Building, 6th Floor Conference Room, 401 N West Street, Jackson, MS.
The class is from 8:30 to 4:30. Sign up below!

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Get back to the basics:

ASPHALT PAVEMENT RECYCLING

Recycling is defined as “the reuse, usually after some processing, of a material that already has served its first-intended purpose”. Relative to asphalt pavement recycling, there are several methods available. Therefore, each project being considered for re- cycling must be carefully evaluated to determine the method most appropriate. The factors should include:

1. Existing pavement condition (PCI)
2. Existing pavement material types and thickness
3. Recycled pavement structural requirements
4. Availability of recycling additives.
Come join us to learn the latest techniques in the industry.
SIGN UP HERE
IPMA Academy 1635 Old Highway 41 Suite 112-248 Kennesaw, Georgia 30152 United States (404) 316-9792 Copyright 2015. All rights reserved