Tag Archive for 'infrastructure'

ICUEE Adds New Chair and Vice-Chair for 2021

ICUEE – The Demo Expo announced that Dave Hughes, vice president of global sales for McElroy Manufacturing, Inc., has been named 2021 show chair. He will be leading the ICUEE management committee, a volunteer group of utility construction industry executives for overall show planning. 

ICUEE, or the International Construction and Utility Equipment Exposition, is the largest of its kind, known for the invaluable and numerous interactive product demonstrations that take place over the 3-day show. The biennial show last took place in 2019 and is set to reopen September 28 – 30, 2021.

“AEM is more than pleased to have Dave on board as the new chair for ICUEE 2021. His expertise and participation will be incredibly valuable to our team as we continue to work towards our goals for 2021. We know that Dave and the rest of our management committee all have a great vision of what ICUEE can and will be and we look forward to announcing some exciting changes in the coming year,” said ICUEE Show Director John Rozum.

“I am extremely pleased to accept this position for the 2021 show. I know that everyone on the committee is dedicated to best serving industry professionals by providing an interactive and valuable experience at ICUEE,” said Hughes.

Dave lives in Tulsa, OK and is married to Michele whom they have three children together. He attended the University of Oklahoma where he received his degree in Accounting and earned an MBA from Case Western Reserve University. Dave has served in many capacities at McElroy since joining in 2001. He is also the President and COO of Southern Specialties (SSC) based in Tulsa, OK.  

Hughes is returning to the ICUEE management committee as he served as the 2019 vice chair. 

He is also very active in Young President’s Organization (YPO) and has served his Tulsa Chapter in all of its major offices, including Chairman

ICUEE 2021 Also Names Show Vice Chair and Management Committee

Serving as vice chair of the ICUEE 2021 Management Committee is Julie Fuller, vice president of engineering, marketing and purchasing for Tadano Mantis Corporation. 

Here is the full roster of the ICUEE 2020 Management Committee.

  • Chris Brahler, President and CEO, TT Technologies Inc
  • Joe Caywood, Director of Marketing & Product Management, Terex Corporation
  • Andrew Christopher, Director, Corporate Business Division, John Deere Construction & Forestry
  • Mark Core, Executive Vice President & CMO, Vermeer Corporation
  • Bruce Farrar, Director – Industrial OEM Sales & Support, Cummins
  • Alessandro Ferrari, VP Sales, Prinoth
  • Jim Glazer, President, Elliott Equipment Company
  • Brian Metcalf, CEO, Ring-O-Matic
  • Sam Miceli, VP and GM, Vactor
  • Laura Ness Owens, VP Marketing, Doosan Bobcat
  • Bob Pettit, CEO, HAWE Hydraulics
  • Mike Popovich, VP Sales & Marketing – Excavators, Vacall/Gradall Industries Inc.
  • Jim Rauckman, Managing Member, Rauckman Utility Products
  • Mark Regan, Director of Sales, NA, Versalift
  • Kevin Smith, President, Hammerhead
  • Grant Williams, Marketing Campaign Manager, Altec Industries Inc.

ICUEE is the leading event for utility professionals and construction contractors seeking comprehensive insights into the latest industry technologies, innovations and trends.

TRIP’s Rocky Moretti Speaks with ATM About the Country’s Slumping Transportation Infrastructure

Listen to the 7-minute podcast

In February 2018, the White House released President Donald J. Trump’s infrastructure principles and initiative with this quote from the president: “We will build gleaming new roads, bridges, highways, railways, and waterways all across our land. And we will do it with American heart, and American hands, and American grit.”

But almost two years later, the American public, and the business and labor sectors are still waiting for these shining words to become reality.

Every day, Rocky Moretti lives why this message carries so much meaning. As Director of Policy & Research for the national transportation research nonprofit TRIP, he examines data and information and writes, edits and presents reports that illuminate the deteriorating state of regional and U.S. transportation infrastructure — all toward the goal of promoting sound public transportation policy.

The newest “ATM Podcast,” for the Americans for Transportation Mobility Coalition, features Moretti’s take on topics like quality of life and economic productivity, safety and congestion, bettering mobility, and America’s substantial transportation infrastructure funding gap. He also provides some insight into current transportation infrastructure challenges in Arizona, Ohio and Wisconsin.

In the last few years, Moretti has gone to Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Carolina and Texas to release reports on their transportation systems.

Sign our petition at http://bit.ly/2rk7EZl and share this story with your friends on social media.

The Role of Volumetric Concrete in the Future of US Infrastructure

By Mark Rinehart and Kris Moorman, Cemen Tech Inc.

When the U.S. gets an infrastructure report card rating of a D+, that’s a wake-up call. At this point, everyone knows that our nation’s infrastructure is failing, and working every day in markets like roads and bridges, water systems and airports, it becomes even more obvious. We are involved in several associations that are out there banging on representatives’ doors trying to get a plan put together, and it seems like things have been slowly moving along, but it’s time to move forward and get a comprehensive infrastructure bill approved.  

Every moment that infrastructure projects sit stalled and unfunded creates a larger and larger backlog of work that needs to be done every single day, and the longer we wait, the bigger the task is going to be to actually fix all this stuff. And as far as politics goes, one would think that this would be a completely bipartisan issue, but any real reaching across the aisle remains to be seen. 

People don’t seem to realize that our infrastructure systems need maintenance just like a car, house or piece of construction equipment. It seems obvious, but you can’t just let something go for 10 or 20 years and think that it’s not going to have problems and issues and will need to be fixed.

Spencer at work site

Unfortunately, we’ve never had an official long-term funding program in place. We’ve decided to look the other way and kick it down the road, and now that inventory of repairs is enormous and needs to be addressed before more major accidents happen. It’s important that we do something now, especially while the economy’s hot. We do have more money coming in, so it’s time to put something in place.

Over 200,000 of our bridges in the U.S. are more than 50 years old. Knowing that a typical paving mix has an average lifespan of about 30 years – and many of these bridges have been out in the elements for 50-plus years with minimal maintenance – should be enough to worry anyone. This is especially true in the Midwest and other regions where you have to deal with salt, sand, and fluctuating temperatures each year. 

One of the many upsides to concrete is that it does have a lower maintenance cost over its lifetime than other types of materials, but it does tend to cost a little bit more in the beginning to put it in place. This can lead to slightly higher bids, which can be bad news for government contracts. With that in mind, let’s take a closer look at what’s actually happening to these ailing roads and bridges.

Things Fall Apart

On a long enough timeline, concrete will always crack, but it’s important to know that there are a number of factors that cause it to do so. Corroding reinforcement materials, subgrade settling/erosion, the type of mix, the way it was poured, quality of finish work – all of these factors affect the durability and lifespan of any concrete project. 

Joe DiMaggio NorthBeach Playground

There’s concrete that’s been around for a hundred years all across the world, but from an infrastructure perspective it ultimately comes down to a cost benefit analysis. If you want 100-year concrete, we can make 100-year concrete, but the question then becomes are you willing to pay for it, and do the necessary maintenance to make it last? Are you willing to pay that higher price for longevity? This becomes a challenge, especially in the public arena where a majority of the time the lowest bid wins. 

The Role of Volumetric Concrete Technology 

A recent study showed that up to 22.3 million cubic yards of ready mix concrete poured today in the U.S. goes back to the plant as wasted. That is a tremendous, and ultimately unsustainable, amount of wasted time and money, all due to outmoded methods of concrete placement. 

Cemen Tech in the process of working with DOTs across the country to educate them on the value of volumetric technology, and how it can speed up projects and essentially save them money using technology for different types of infrastructure repairs.

Volumetric concrete is batching based on volume rather than weight. All volumetric equipment is calibrated by weight, and the material is delivered to the mix auger by volume. This produces the precise amount of fresh concrete with every pour. Mix designs can be changed on the fly at the job site without compromising the quality of the concrete. Specialty concretes like fiber-reinforced, colored or slurry can be quickly and easily produced from the same load of materials.

With volumetric equipment, companies have the ability to limit the amount of time a road or bridge must be shut down, because of how fast they can get in, pour and get out. This allows the general public to utilize that repaired structure in hours instead of days. The key advantage of volumetric concrete is that it allows the exact type of concrete that’s needed to be poured directly onsite in the exact quantity that’s needed for that repair.  

Helen Dillar Playground

Typical repair projects like overlays, hinge repairs, etc. usually require smaller pours that can be hard to estimate when working with traditional concrete placement. Volumetric technology allows contractors to pour the exact amount of concrete, and the exact mix design, with zero waste.

A volumetric concrete mixer is a concrete mixer mounted on a truck or trailer that contains separate compartments for sand, stone, cement and water. Materials are mixed on a job site to produce the exact amount of concrete needed. The process and equipment has been in use for 50 years. 

As opposed to rotary drum mixers, mobile volumetric concrete mixers allow for an efficient and more environmentally friendly method of producing and pouring concrete. Volumetric solutions produce the exact amount of concrete needed at the precise time, eliminating the possibility of under or over-ordering concrete that will ultimately be wasted. Also, as a result of mixing on-site, volumetric solutions generate less waste and consume less fossil fuels. 

Volumetric concrete also allows contractors to use the minimal amount of water needed to achieve the acquired strength for project requirements. When working with concrete, the more water you add to a mix, the less strength it will have when it finally hardens, so you want to use as little water as possible. 

Volumetric mixing has been around for 50 years, and it’s evolved incredibly in the past five to 10 years. Extremely high-quality concrete can be produced, placed, tracked and monitored, which allows contractors to get their projects done faster and have full control over the concrete production process. What that means for a DOT, is that ultimately, they can get more repairs done faster, at a lower cost, and with less impact to the public. 

GG Bridge

If we are going to find our way out of the mess we’re in, volumetric concrete technology will have a huge role in fixing the massive backlog of infrastructure repairs that are currently haunting every state, city and county in the United States. 

Next-Gen Volumetric Mixing Technology Pours the Infrastructure Backbone of the Golden City

Bauman Landscape and Construction, Inc. has helped build some of San Francisco’s most complex and iconic cityscapes. From the Palace of Fine Arts to Dolores Park to the city’s Embarcadero, Bauman Landscape and Construction has been pouring concrete in the city for more than four decades. 

The company’s success in the Bay Area has been built on a foundation of obsessive quality, efficiency, and a willingness to trust new innovations and technology. One of the most significant innovations Bauman has embraced is volumetric concrete mixing technology. When Bauman started using volumetric mixing technology, the trend was still in its infancy, but the city of San Francisco quickly realized the company was able to deliver concrete faster and more reasonable than their competitors who were still using traditional barrel mixers.

In addition to being high quality, quick, and on budget, Bauman boasted another feature that set them apart: being green. San Francisco, well known as a hub for sustainability, appreciated Bauman’s ability to take any unused concrete, take it back to their yard, crush it and re-use it as concrete aggregate.

“That was huge in the city,” said Mike Bauman, Chief Executive Officer of Bauman Landscape and Construction. “They require everything to be recycled and we are pretty green as far as recycling and reusing the concrete.

“We are the first company in San Francisco to use 100 percent recycled aggregate in our mix. The barrel mix guys use about 50 percent.”

But the company’s success didn’t set-in overnight. The city, which hires Bauman’s company to pour streetscapes, curbs, gutters, as well as structural walls and building slabs, required the company to do test pours before each load out of the mixer, Bauman said. After some test runs and some solid test results, the city gave Bauman the full green light.

“They were so used to barrel mixers,” Bauman said. “Since we were the first ones out here with the volumetric mixers, now we have a great reputation with the city. They like our mixers and they like the mix better than the barrel mixers.”

Time for an Upgrade

In 2017, Bauman identified a few soft spots in his equipment and was ready to make some serious upgrades. His previous volumetric mixers required skilled concrete operators, who were becoming harder and harder to come by, and experienced recurring issues with bent, broken or faulty chutes, which caused downtime. 

So, Bauman turned to Cemen Tech to deliver four initial C60 mobile concrete mixers to help streamline their operation, increase efficiencies on-site and in their driver hiring, while also minimizing downtime. With the Cemen Tech C Series mixers, Bauman’s team was able to batch, measure, mix, pour, record and analyze each job with just the onboard equipment of the machine itself. Additionally, the ability to load a variety of different mix composites made toggling back-and-forth between jobs or within the same job a breeze.

“The C60s we have equipped with the liquid color, which is great because everything we do out here is color, even the simple sidewalks have color in them,” Bauman said. “We probably have 25 mix designs pre-loaded because of all the different type of work that we do out here. They pretty much run themselves.”

Unrivaled Quality

You don’t hold a reputation for excellent, reliable work for more than 40 years without taking quality control seriously. That’s where Angela Bauman comes in, the company’s lead Project Manager who has a passion for process improvement, quality control and efficiency.

In addition to Angela, the company also has a full-time quality control person on staff, who is responsible for running in-house testing before mixes go out for pouring. With the Cemen Tech mixers, once the mixes are tested and approved, Bauman’s team is able to make a single run and knock-out a multi-mix job.

“One huge benefit for us is in the city there is the streetscapes. We do a lot of streetscapes and the curb, gutter and sidewalks are all different mixes,” Angela said. “We used to have to get three short loads just to pour a curb ramp, so now with the Cemen Tech mixers we can just change the mix three different times in one truck and pour the entire thing.

“That has been absolutely awesome for us because we do streetscapes everywhere and that has just been an incredible advantage.”

The speed with which Bauman is able to complete jobs nearly rivals the quality of their work. On a recent job on Chestnut Street in the northern tip of the city, Bauman Landscape and Construction was responsible for completing the entire baseline of the project. When they quoted the city with their proposed timeline, the city was skeptical.

“They said, ‘We don’t think you can do it that quick,’” Angela said. “We were beating the schedule by almost a year. And, sure enough, we did, and it was awesome.”

Curbing Driver Shortages

Across the country, companies of all types, sizes and geographic location are struggling to hire and retain professional drivers, much less good ones. It’s a trend not expected to subside, and many analysts believe the shortage could as much as triple by 2026.

With Bauman’s original equipment, which was tricky to operate and resulted in more downtime than the company could swallow, highly skilled operators became even harder to come by. Now, Mike Bauman said, the Cemen Tech machines have made that hurdle much easier to clear.

“It is incredible because now we can take a UPS driver and put them in a C60 and they could run it,” he said. “It’s a real benefit for us. It is tough to find good quality people, so we have to pay over scale, but we are able to lure away good quality drivers from other companies to work for us now.”

Part of what makes the vehicles so easy to operate are their electronic control panel that gives the user total control over how much is poured and which mixture is being used. The Cemen Tech C60 units also come equipped with Auto-Washout and Auto-Stow features for easy transportation and clean up as well as the ACCU-POUR options.

ACCU-POUR is a suite of cloud-based, wireless productivity solutions that allows Bauman to blend the everyday details from dispatch to completed jobs to a holistic view of their business operations. 

Cemen Tech also provides on-site training for both mechanical and maintenance training, as well as driver training. Now, the drivers who went through the initial round of training are able to train any new drivers who join the Bauman team.

A Smooth Partnership

The relationship between Cemen Tech and Bauman has been mutually-beneficial. As one pours foundational elements to one of America’s most iconic cities, the other continues to press-forward with innovative technology and customer support that keeps their customers running on all cylinders.

Volumetric concrete mixing technology has given Bauman Landscape and Construction a distinct advantage on their home turf. It’s an advantage they don’t expect to be relinquished soon.

“Even though it was hard to get the city to open their eyes to volumetric mixers…we took a leap of faith and they did,” Angela said. “The city, ever since then is convinced.”

During every step of the way, both organizations have worked together to guarantee success.

“The immediate customer service, you need that support, especially when you are new to a product,” Angela said. “You want to be able to call someone and have them make you feel good about what you are purchasing and make sure they are going to be on board if something were to happen, or if you need the additional support or training.

“Cemen Tech has done that, and have followed-through in more ways that we could have ever thought.”

Senate Considers FY2020 Transportation Appropriations

By John Schneidawind, vice president of public affairs, ARTBA

The Senate the week of Oct. 21 began debating the Fiscal Year 2020 Transportation Appropriations bill that, if enacted, would provide over $65 billion for highway, transit, and airport capital spending. The legislation would fully fund highway programs at FAST Act authorized levels, though fall short on transit spending.

In addition to the spending authorized as part of surface transportation and aviation bills, legislators include $4.7 billion in additional funding for highway, transit and airport programs, due to a bipartisan budget agreement earlier in the year. Here’s the complete spending breakdown on these programs:

The Senate is expected to conclude debate and pass the legislation the week of Oct. 28. The House and Senate bills would then enter a process known as a “conference”, where the two chambers negotiate the differences and agree on final legislative text for each to vote on again before heading to the president for his signature.

All federal government programs subject to the annual appropriations process are currently running at FY 2019 levels via a temporary extension of spending authority through Nov. 21.  While the differences in the House and Senate transportation spending bills are relatively minor, macro issues related to overall funding levels and controversial policies in other spending bills may prevent the sides from reaching an agreement on the transportation bill before another extension is needed.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) said it would be “optimistic” to expect any of the annual spending bills to become law before the current stopgap expires Nov. 21 and another temporary spending extension may delay the final measure into early spring.

Busy Week at ARTBA — Check It Out

ARTBA & Other Groups Urge Senate Vote on Highway Bill

October 18, 2019 

By John Schneidawind, vice president of public affairs, ARTBA

ARTBA and a cross section of nearly 40 national organizations representing business and organized labor are urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to bring S. 2302, the America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act (ATIA), to a floor vote by the end of the year.

The Senate’s Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee July 29 unanimously passed the ATIA, but “it is up to the rest of the Senate to take the next steps,” the groups wrote in an Oct. 17 letter to McConnell. (see below)

Those steps include consideration by the Senate’s Commerce, Banking and Finance committees. The Finance Committee is tasked with developing a way to pay spending called for by the legislation, which represents the first surface transportation program reauthorization bill in nearly 15 years that would significantly increase federal investment in highway safety and mobility improvements.

In urging McConnell to bring the bill to the Senate floor for consideration, the letter notes that “history has demonstrated that delaying action on such measures until their deadline leads to two outcomes: short-term extensions; and the disruption of state highway improvement plans.”

The letter praises McConnell for moving the last highway program reauthorization through the Senate after the EPW Committee passed it in June 2015, which “with your personal support, spurred action from other Senate Committees and the House of Representatives. This culminated in the enactment of the “Fixing America’s Transportation (FAST) Act six months later.”

The House of Representatives has yet to take any action to introduce similar highway program reauthorization legislation.

Summer Transportation Construction Work Hits Record $45.6 Billion

October 17, 2019

By Mark Holan, editorial director, ARTBA

Transportation contractors were busy this summer, with the value of work up across all modes in June, July, and August compared to the same three-month period in 2018.

Contractors performed a record $45.6 billion in transportation and transportation-related construction work, up 12 percent compared to the $40.8 billion put in place June through August 2018, according to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

“Highway and street pavement work has shown continued strength, with $21.7 billion in work between June and August 2019, compared to $19.6 billion in market activity through the same time period in 2018,” said ARTBA Chief Economist, Dr. Alison Black. “Work is also up for bridge, airport, transit, rail and port/waterway construction.”

ARTBA contractor members can have their say about what was going on by taking a few minutes to answer our third quarter industry conditions survey. The deadline is Oct. 28.

State and local government highway and bridge contract awards continue to show strength in some of the nation’s largest markets, Black said, including California, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, Texas, and Virginia. Year to date, market activity is up 10 percent across all transportation modes.

Dr. Black will take a deeper dive into market conditions and federal, state, and local funding trends at ARTBA’s four upcoming regional meetings. Learn more and register here.

ATIA Group Letter to Senate Leader McConnell

October 17, 2019 

The Honorable Mitch McConnell 

Majority Leader 

U.S. Senate 

Washington, D.C. 20510 

 Dear Leader McConnell: 

The Senate Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee’s America’s Transportation 

Infrastructure Act (ATIA), S. 2302, provides a rare opportunity to benefit all states and continue the nation’s longest economic expansion in history. While the EPW Committee has unanimously approved a critical federal infrastructure initiative, it is up to the rest of the Senate to take the next steps. 

We applaud EPW Committee Chairman Barrasso, Ranking Member Carper and all committee 

members for proactively moving forward with a reauthorization of the federal highway program more than a year before it expires. History has demonstrated that delaying action on such measures until their deadline leads to two outcomes: short-term extensions; and disruption of state highway improvement plans. 

The ATIA is not only timely, but it would also deliver meaningful enhancement to the nation’s 

highway and bridge infrastructure network. It would provide historic investment levels, deliver 

beneficial projects faster by cutting red tape, tap private sector capital and innovations, prioritize safety, and improve the quality of life for rural and urban communities. The ATIA is an important foundation to begin addressing the critical need to modernize America’s infrastructure. 

The ATIA earned unanimous endorsement of EPW Committee members and supportive comments from President Trump. This unique show of broad, bipartisan cooperation speaks not only to the merits of the legislation, but also to its prospects for passage. The EPW Committee approved a highway program reauthorization in June 2015 that, with your personal support, spurred action from other Senate committees and the House of Representatives. This culminated in the enactment of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act six months later. 

We urge you to ensure the progress made on the ATIA continues by committing to schedule a 

reauthorization of the federal surface transportation programs for floor consideration this year. 

Such a pledge would be an unequivocal signal to the other relevant Senate committees to begin developing their respective components of the final bill. 

Sincerely,

American Road & Transportation Builders Association 

Associated General Contractors of America 

U.S. Chamber of Commerce 

American Society of Civil Engineers 

Associated Equipment Manufacturers 

The National Industrial Transportation League 

American Public Works Association 

Transportation Intermediaries Association 

National Association of Chemical Distributors 

North America’s Building Trades Unions 

International Union of Operating Engineers 

Laborers International Union of North America 

American Public Transportation Association 

Equipment Dealers Association 

Associated Equipment Distributors 

National Tank Truck Carriers, Inc. 

American Highway Users Alliance 

National Stone, Sand & Gravel Association 

American Council of Engineering Companies 

American Concrete Pipe Association 

Coalition for America’s Gateway & Trade Corridors 

Energy Equipment & Infrastructure Alliance 

National Ready Mixed Concrete Association 

National Steel Bridge Alliance 

Portland Cement Association 

Industrial Minerals Association – North America 

American Concrete Pavement Association 

Construction & Demolition Recycling Association 

American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 

International Warehouse Logistics Association 

National Parking Association 

Foodservice Equipment Distributors Association (FEDA) 

National Association of Trailer Manufacturers 

Food Marketing Institute 

CCIM Institute 

Independent Lubricant Manufacturers Association 

Associated Wire Rope Fabricators 

Building Owners and Managers Association 

Cc: All U.S. Senators