Tag Archive for 'jobs'

AEM Hails USMCA Senate Passage

Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) senior vice president of government and industry relations Kip Eideberg issued the following statement on the U.S. Senate passing implementing language to ratify the United States-Canada-Mexico Agreement (USMCA) today: 
“Equipment manufacturers, farmers, and hardworking families across the country are thankful for today’s full congressional ratification of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA),” said Kip Eideberg, AEM senior vice president of government and industry relations. “This new agreement updates the current, decades-old trade deal, supporting a modernized global marketplace. As members of the USMCA Coalition, we are proud to have joined more than 600 associations and business groups in advocating for a stronger trade deal that will add up to $68 billion to our economy, create 176,000 jobs, and preserve duty-free market access to our Canadian and Mexican trading partners. We applaud President Trump, Vice President Pence, Senate Majority Leader McConnell, and House Speaker Pelosi for their efforts to negotiate and ratify the agreement.” 
Since the creation of NAFTA two decades ago, equipment manufacturers have benefited greatly from duty-free market access to our industry’s two largest export markets, Canada and Mexico. Equipment manufacturers support 1.3 million jobs in the U.S. and 149,000 in Canada. The industry also contributes $188 billion to the U.S. and Canadian economies.Over the past two years, AEM has called on both the Trump Administration and Congress to deliver an updated North American trade agreement for the 21st century. USMCA fulfills many of our industry’s goals and strengthens North American equipment manufacturing. 
Efforts include co-hosting the Honorable Mike Pence, Vice President of the United States, at an equipment manufacturing facility earlier this year in support of the agreement, sending a letter in support of the USMCA to Chairman Neal (D-Mass.) and the nine members of the House Democrats’ Trade Working Group, and running an ongoing public education campaign on the various benefits of a ratified USMCA. AEM is also a member of the USMCA Coalition.

AEM is the North American-based international trade group representing off-road equipment manufacturers and suppliers, with more than 1,000 companies and more than 200 product lines in the agriculture and construction-related industry sectors worldwide. The equipment manufacturing industry supports 1.3 million jobs in the U.S. Equipment manufacturers also contribute $159 billion to the U.S. economy. AEM is celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2019.
Visit www.aem.org/advocacy for more information.   

Why Recruit Veterans

Beyond Workforce Development, Workforce Solutions

by Julie Davis,

Association of Equipment Manufacturers Director of Work Force Development.

Are you tired yet of pulling from the same employment pool? If the answer is yes, then you are ready to explore the new world of veteran recruitment. If you think that you’ve tried it, it doesn’t work for you or there is no one to recruit in your area, then you simply aren’t up to date. 

Why recruit Veterans?

Many companies find veterans to be more productive employees with lower turnover rates when compared to their nonveteran counterparts. Additionally, their past military background can give veterans distinctive capabilities and perspectives that can add insight and diversity to your team’s problem solving. Employers can also qualify for up to $10,000 in federal tax credits per veteran. 

There are multiple state and federal organizations that exist to connect employers with veterans. Many of them work with veterans before they leave active duty to ensure they have skills that can plug immediately into the workforce. Furthermore, just because you may not have a military base located near you is no longer a reason to exclude veterans from your search. Organizations looking to place veterans into employment include working to get veterans back to their home states if that is what they are looking for. Taking a few extra steps could mean providing a veteran the opportunity to truly come home.

Veteran Retainment

Approximately 40 percent of veterans leave their first job out of the military within a year of being hired. The transition can be challenging but there is some common sense, yet very real ways that you can position your company to retain your veterans. 

First, define what your motivation is to hire veterans. Then identify what skills, attitudes and experience would benefit your organization the most. (If you are not sure, simply find your best current employee in that position and identify their skills, attitudes and experiences.) 

Decide what a successful veteran hiring program for your organization looks like. Are you looking for just one or is this going to become a regular program? 

Identify the service branches, ranks and occupational specialties you might like to target. Don’t know? That’s okay because there’s multiple ways to connect. You could reach out to your state or local Veteran’ office and talk with someone or here are some great website you can connect with:

Understand the basics
https://content.iospress.com/articles/work/wor01987
(A brief introduction to military workplace culture)  
https://www.va.gov/VETSINWORKPLACE/docs/em_termsLingo.asp 
(Common Terms) 

Difference between the branches 
https://www.va.gov/VETSINWORKPLACE/mil_structure.asp

Difference between officer and enlisted ranks 
https://www.va.gov/VETSINWORKPLACE/docs/em_rank.asp

Civilian to Military Occupation Translator
https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/civilian-to-military-translator.aspx?frd=true

While building your veteran’s program, don’t forget to tap into your secret weapon – any veterans you are currently employing. Get their thoughts about skills and areas of service that might be a good fit. Don’t forget to ask them what about working for your organization might appeal to a veteran. After all, they have stayed with you! 

There are multiple employment organizations that will connect you with veterans. A few of my favorite include:

Hero’s MAKE America (Provides 10 weeks accelerated skills training for manufacturing)http://www.themanufacturinginstitute.org/Initiatives/Military-and-Veterans/Heroes-MAKE-America/Heroes-MAKE-America.aspx 

Hire a Hero
https://www.hireheroesusa.org/hire-a-veteran/ 

Bradley-Morris, Inc. (Specifically for Skilled Technicians)
https://www.bradley-morris.com/military-recruiting-firms/field-service-technician/

Orian Talent
https://www.oriontalent.com/military-job-seekers/enlisted-technicians/

Lastly, don’t forget that to retain your veteran, you may want to consider having some supports in place to make their transition smooth. Connect them to existing veterans in your workplace, let them know about opportunities for professional growth and advancement, and consider engaging current veterans in creating the program to ensure its effectiveness. 

Veterans who are coming out of service where they have worked with heavy equipment may be a perfect fit for the construction, agriculture, mining, utility or forestry industry sectors. Don’t let taking a few extra steps keep you from your next best hire.

ARTBA Reports: Voters Approve Nearly 90 Percent of Transportation Investment Ballot Measures

Voters in 19 states Nov. 5 sent a decisive message of support for transportation investment, approving almost 90 percent of 305 state and local transportation ballot measures.
 
In total, the 270 approved initiatives are expected to generate over $9.6 billion in one-time and recurring revenue, according to the analysis conducted by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s Transportation Investment Advocacy Center™ (ARTBA-TIAC). Two measures in Texas are still pending.
 
“The ballot results are a great reminder infrastructure investment remains one of the few areas where red states, blue states, Republicans and Democrats can all come together,” ARTBA President Dave Bauer said.  “It should also demonstrate to lawmakers on Capitol Hill that the public will be on board for the passage of a long-term bill that significantly boosts highway and transit investment at the federal level.”
 
A complete report and an all-new interactive dashboard that filters results by state, mode, year and type of initiative are available at the Center’s flagship website: www.transportationinvestment.org.
 
The preliminary results reaffirm a decade-long trend of voters strongly supporting investments to maintain and improve their state or local transportation networks. Voters have approved 81 percent of nearly 2,000 transportation investment ballot measures tracked by ARTBA-TIAC since 2010, including this year’s results.
 
“Public support for increasing infrastructure investment continues to help local governments and the transportation construction community improve safety, mobility and overall quality of life for residents as projects get underway,” said Carolyn Kramer, ARTBA-TIAC director. 
 
Voters in Maine overwhelmingly approved, by a 76 percent to 24 percent margin, a $105 million bond measure to support transportation infrastructure projects. The vote was Maine’s seventh successful transportation bond in eight years.
 
While transportation investment fared well nationwide, Washington state voters endorsed by a 56 percent to 44 percent margin a measure that reduces or repeals certain motor vehicle taxes and fees and removes the authority to impose certain new fees without their approval. This decision will cost the state nearly $4.3 billion in state and local transportation revenue over the next six years. 
 
Voters in Colorado rejected by a 55 percent to 45 percent vote a measure that would have permitted the state to retain excess tax collections in order to fund education and transportation.
 
The 305 measures tracked by ARTBA-TIAC is the largest number ever for an odd-numbered, off-year election. Although historically most transportation measures are put on the ballot in even-numbered years when congressional or presidential elections drive higher turnout, an increasing number of measures are being considered by voters during odd-numbered years and primary elections.
 
There were 57 measures in 12 states that would raise over $20 million each, compared to 21 measures in 2017.  Of that total, 89 percent were approved.  Of 25 measures that would raise over $100 million, voters approved 92 percent.  This included a bond measure in Harris County, Texas to support transit expansions in Houston under the “Moving Forward Plan.”    
 
Of the local ballot measures, most (302 of 305) were property tax increases, primarily in Ohio (154) and Michigan (15), where many municipalities consistently ask voters to renew such assessments to pay for local roads and infrastructure repairs.
 
Additionally, local bond measures in Texas appeared on 25 ballots and received 96 percent approval, which will generate nearly $6 billion. Most of these measures established municipal utility districts.
 
The approved measures will support $7.7 billion in new transportation investment revenue and $1.9 billion in continued funding through tax extensions, renewals or protections. The timing of the market impact of these actions is difficult to project as revenue approved will last up to 25 years.
 
The Transportation Investment Advocacy Center ™ (TIAC) is a first-of-its kind, dynamic education program and Internet-based information resource designed to help private citizens, legislators, organizations and businesses successfully grow transportation investment at the state and local levels through the legislative and ballot initiative processes.

Senate Considers FY2020 Transportation Appropriations

By John Schneidawind, vice president of public affairs, ARTBA

The Senate the week of Oct. 21 began debating the Fiscal Year 2020 Transportation Appropriations bill that, if enacted, would provide over $65 billion for highway, transit, and airport capital spending. The legislation would fully fund highway programs at FAST Act authorized levels, though fall short on transit spending.

In addition to the spending authorized as part of surface transportation and aviation bills, legislators include $4.7 billion in additional funding for highway, transit and airport programs, due to a bipartisan budget agreement earlier in the year. Here’s the complete spending breakdown on these programs:

The Senate is expected to conclude debate and pass the legislation the week of Oct. 28. The House and Senate bills would then enter a process known as a “conference”, where the two chambers negotiate the differences and agree on final legislative text for each to vote on again before heading to the president for his signature.

All federal government programs subject to the annual appropriations process are currently running at FY 2019 levels via a temporary extension of spending authority through Nov. 21.  While the differences in the House and Senate transportation spending bills are relatively minor, macro issues related to overall funding levels and controversial policies in other spending bills may prevent the sides from reaching an agreement on the transportation bill before another extension is needed.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) said it would be “optimistic” to expect any of the annual spending bills to become law before the current stopgap expires Nov. 21 and another temporary spending extension may delay the final measure into early spring.

TRIP Reports: LOUISIANA MOTORISTS LOSE $6.9 BILLION ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES

  LOUISIANA MOTORISTS LOSE $6.9 BILLION ANNUALLY —AS MUCH AS $2,300 PER DRIVER – ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES. LACK OF FUNDING WILL LEAD TO FURTHER DETERIORATION, INCREASED CONGESTION AND HIGHER COSTS TO MOTORISTS

Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost Louisiana motorists a total of $6.9 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,291 per driver in some urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Louisiana, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research nonprofit.

The TRIP report, Louisiana Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Louisiana, nearly half of major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor or mediocre condition, 13 percent of locally and state-maintained bridges (20 feet or more in length) are rated poor/structurally deficient, and the state’s roads have the fifth highest fatality rate in the nation. The report also finds that Louisiana’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, causing significant delays and choking commuting and commerce.

Driving on deficient Louisiana roads costs the state’s drivers $6.9 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculates the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Baton Rouge, Lafayette, New Orleans and Shreveport urban areas.  A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area, along with a statewide total, is below.

The TRIP report finds that 25 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads in Louisiana are in poor condition and another 22 percent are in mediocre condition, costing the state’s motorists a total of $2.1 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

Thirteen percent of Louisiana’s bridges are rated poor/structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Thirty-seven percent of the state’s bridges are rated in fair condition and the remaining 50 percent are in good condition.

“The strength of Louisiana’s manufacturing economy relies in a large part on reliable, accessible infrastructure. It is getting harder to find a funding solution for new highways and bridges that does not include new revenue and we support that,” said Dow Chemical Southeast U.S. State Government Affairs Director Tommy Faucheux. “We not only have to address the poor condition of our existing roads and bridges, we also need to look to the future and the new projects, like a new bridge in the Baton Rouge area, that the Capital Region and the state desperately need.”

Traffic crashes in Louisiana claimed the lives 3,683 people between 2013 and 2017. Louisiana’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.54 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2017 is significantly higher than the national average of 1.16 and the fifth highest in the nation.  Traffic crashes in which the lack of adequate roadway safety features were likely a contributing factor cost Louisiana drivers $2.3 billion annually.

Traffic congestion in Louisiana is worsening, causing up to 58 annual hours of delay for drivers in the most congested areas and costing the state’s drivers a total of $2.5 billion annually in lost time and wasted fuel.

“The TRIP data confirms that Louisiana must invest heavily in improving and expanding transportation infrastructure,” said Johnny Milazzo, owner of Lard Oil Company, and member of Capital Region Industry for Sustainable Infrastructure Solutions. “Our bridges and roadways are not only unsafe and in poor shape, the level of traffic congestion in the Capital Region and the hidden costs of time and wasted fuel are striking, and felt very keenly by area businesses.”

The efficiency and condition of Louisiana’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy.  Annually, $503 billion in goods are shipped to and from Louisiana, relying heavily on the state’s network of roads and bridges. Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system. Approximately one million full-time jobs in Louisiana in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are dependent on the quality, safety and reliability of the state’s transportation infrastructure network.

“These conditions are only going to get worse, increasing the additional costs to motorists, if greater investment is not made available at the federal, state and local levels of government,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without adequate funding, Louisiana’s transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and congested, hampering economic growth, safety and quality of life.

Louisiana Transportation

by the Numbers

MEETING THE STATE’S NEED FOR

SAFE, SMOOTH AND EFFICIENT MOBILITY

LOUISIANA KEY TRANSPORTATION FACTS

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

Driving on Louisiana roads that are deteriorated, congested and that lack some desirable safety features costs Louisiana drivers a total of $6.9 billion each year. TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on rough roads, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes. The chart below details the cost of deficient roads statewide and for the average driver in the state’s largest urban areas.

LOUISIANA ROADS PROVIDE A ROUGH RIDE

Due to inadequate state and local funding, 47 percent of major roads and highways in Louisiana are in poor or mediocre condition. Driving on rough roads costs the average Louisiana driver $625 annually in additional vehicle operating costs – a total of $2.1 billion statewide.  The chart below details pavement conditions on major urban roads in the state’s largest urban areas and statewide.

LOUISIANA BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Thirteen percent of Louisiana’s bridges are rated in poor/structurally deficient condition, meaning there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Thirty-seven percent of the state’s bridges are rated in fair condition and the remaining 50 percent are in good condition. Most bridges are designed to last 50 years before major overhaul or replacement, although many newer bridges are being designed to last 75 years or longer. In Louisiana, 33 percent of the state’s bridges were built in 1969 or earlier. The chart below details bridge conditions statewide and in the state’s largest urban areas.

LOUISIANA ROADS ARE INCREASINGLY CONGESTED

Congested roads choke commuting and commerce and cost Louisiana drivers $2.5 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. In the most congested urban areas, drivers lose up to $1,103 and as many as 58 hours per year sitting in congestion.

LOUISIANA TRAFFIC SAFETY AND FATALITIES

From 2013 to 2017, 3,683 people were killed in traffic crashes in Louisiana.   In 2017, Louisiana had 1.54 traffic fatalities for every 100 million miles traveled, the fifth highest rate in the nation.

Traffic crashes imposed a total of $6.8 billion in economic costs in Louisiana in 2017 and traffic crashes in which a lack of adequate roadway safety features were likely a contributing factor imposed $2.3 billion in economic costs.   The chart below details the number of people killed in traffic crashes in the state’s largest urban areas between 2015 and 2017, and the cost of traffic crashes per driver.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of Louisiana’s economy is riding on its transportation system. Each year, $503 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Louisiana.  Increases in passenger and freight movement will place further burdens on the state’s already deteriorated and congested network of roads and bridges.

According to a report by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association, the design, construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Louisiana support approximately 78,000 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $3.2 billion annually. Approximately one million full-time jobs in Louisiana in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation network.

 

For full report visit https://tripnet.org