Tag Archive for 'jobsite'

Capturing the Past – Historic Livermore Winery Building Lives on in a 3-D Point Cloud

 

DEWALT announces the new FLEXVOLT™ 60V MAX* Dust Extractor (DCV585)

DEWALT  FLEXVOLT™ 60V MAX* DUST EXTRACTOR

DEWALT announces the new FLEXVOLT™ 60V MAX* Dust Extractor (DCV585), adding to its system of more than 120 Table 1 Compliant** Solutions of drilling, cutting, and grinding tools, dust extractors, accessories, and shrouds intended to limit workers’ exposure to respirable crystalline silica.

The 60V MAX* Dust Extractor runs off of DEWALT FLEXVOLT Batteries and is an efficient and portable way to be OSHA Table 1 compliant** on the job site. For concrete drilling and grinding/cutting up to 5-inch wheels, the 60V MAX* Dust Extractor achieves 125 CFM. Featuring Wireless Tool Control that gives the user the option to activate the extractor from a few feet away using the included remote. Additionally, the 60V MAX* Dust Extractor offers an automatic filter cleaning mechanism.

The 60V MAX* Dust Extractor is part of the DEWALT PERFORM & PROTECT™ line of tools designed to provide a high level of one or more of the following: control, dust containment or low vibration, without sacrificing performance. For a list of the DEWALT PERFORM & PROTECT™ drilling and grinding solutions that adhere to the new OSHA ruling on protections for workers exposed to respirable silica dust, go to DEWALT.com.

Available where DEWALT products are sold in November 2018, the 60V MAX* Dust Extractor will come kitted with two HEPA Filters and two Batteries for $549 MSRP (DCV585T2). It will also come bare for $349 MSRP (DCV585B). The 60V MAX* Dust Extractor will come standard with a three-year limited warranty, one-year free service contract and 90-day money-back guarantee.

With respect to 60V MAX* – Maximum initial battery voltage (measured without a workload) is 60 volts. Nominal voltage is 54.

**Compliant to the Exposure Control Methods described in Table 1 of 29 CFR 1926.1153 when outlined components are operated and maintained in accordance to manufacturer’s instructions, assuming that airflow is measured in accordance with the motor/fan system test. OSHA is reviewing the exact requirements for dust extraction in these applications.

FEATURES

  • 125 CFM provides OSHA Table 1 Compliant Solutions for up to 5″ Tuckpointing and Surfacing Applications when paired with an appropriate dust shroud
  • Automatic Filter Cleaning, with Dual Filters
  • HEPA Filter Included with Unit
  • Wireless Tool Control™ Allows for wireless ON/OFF capability when paired with the included Remote or a Wireless Tool Control™ Enabled Tool
  • T-Stak Compatibility Allows Unit to be Stacked and Combined with other DEWALT® T-Stak Storage Systems
  • 8 Foot Long Anti Static Hose with DEWALT® AIRLOCK™ system.
  • Built-in hose wrap offers convenient hose storage when not in use
  • Meets the EPA Lead Related Renovations, Repair, and Painting (RRP) rule for HEPA vacuums when used with the included HEPA filter.
  • Can be used with Wet or Dry applications

SPECIFICATIONS

  • HOSE LENGTH          8.0 F
  • MAX CFM                          125.0 CFM
  • SYSTEM                        60V MAX*
  • TANK SIZE                   2.0 GAL
  • TOOL HEIGHT           13.0 IN
  • TOOL LENGTH           21.5 IN
  • TOOL WEIGHT         17.6 LBS

INCLUDES

  • DCV585 60V MAX Dust Extractor
  • Wireless Tool Control™ Remote
  • (1) Fleece Bag
  • (2) HEPA Filters

For more information visit FLEXVOLT™ 60V MAX* Dust Extractor

 

On The Right Track

AGC Innovation Awards

AEM Recommends — Build a Strong Construction Safety Culture

Commit to Ongoing Training, Take Advantage of Technology

 Safety is improving in the construction industry, according to the National Safety Council, but serious injuries and fatalities still occur.

“I think it’s fair to say that while we have been getting better at preventing most incidents and improving safety, in general, there are specific ways in which we have not been improving and we need to do more to address,” explains John Dony of the Campbell Institute/National Safety Council.

Dony and fellow safety professionals outlined how to build a strong construction safety culture in a recent CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 article (learn more at http://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe/).

Beyond Compliance: Creating a Culture of Safety

Going beyond compliance training is one of the biggest things that organizations in any industry can do, but this is perhaps more relevant in construction than any other industry because compliance training is often mandated, according to Dony.

He suggests that training around more advanced safety topics and focusing on creating a culture of safety are what is really critical – not necessarily being able to score 80 percent on a comprehensive test.

Operator In Safety Helmet and red square shirt receiving instruction for Straight Boom Lift

Creating a culture of safety includes empowering all workers, employees, or contractors to make observations, report unsafe conditions, and have the authority to stop work without retribution.

“Until an organization is able to build that sort of a culture and back it with a management system built on the principle of continuous improvement, it won’t get very far with training,” he explains.

Consider this example: you can take first aid training a hundred times, but you will never be a doctor. You’ll just be very good at first aid.

In the same way, focusing on a basic level of safety training and not paying attention to systems and culture will not fundamentally make an organization any safer, Dony says.

Still, there are a number of resources and tools at the disposal of construction companies today. For instance, rainy-day and on-the-spot training are available and effective. However, in-person training provides invaluable tools, resources, and information to ensure participants can apply information learned in the field, suggests Eric Perry of the American Traffic Safety Services Assn. (ATSSA).

Emerging Technologies Enhance Safety Training

Technology, in general, is making training and development both more efficient and effective. Case in point: mobile learning, education and training conducted via hand-held devices.

“Training is no longer one and done, check-the-box events,” says David Braunstein of Together for Safer Roads.

“Organizations can now offer ongoing, engaging micro-learning events, reaching employees who do not normally work out of an office environment. This means safety training can literally accompany employees

Excavator operator using tablet computer at work site

to the jobsite, keeping safe practices and procedures top of mind,” he explains.

Braunstein suggests one of the most important skills any employee can develop in the construction industry is hazard recognition—and technology can help.

Advances in the field of training and development include virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), which are already helping many construction professionals analyze, predict, and prevent hazardous situations.

Other emerging technologies that can help with safety training include:

  • Wearables for monitoring heat stress or limiting access to restricted areas
  • Sensors for avoiding human and machine interaction
  • Drones for inspections
  • Mobile devices for safety reporting and information

Dony says the applications for technology that help make workers safer are nearly limitless, and more are being explored by organizations every day.

“The key is to consider what technology will have the biggest bang for the buck and also ensure that you don’t add any additional or new risks to a project when you integrate technology as a solution for an existing problem,” he says.

“For many employees, acceptance of new technologies can be challenging, so it is important for companies to invest in meaningful training to understand the purpose and successful use of these technologies,” says Braunstein.

Learn more about industry trends and technologies through the CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 initiative (https://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe/) of the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM).