Tag Archive for 'non-residential'

ABC Says: Nonresidential Construction Spending Slips to Start 2017

Nonresidential construction spending contracted during January, according to analysis of U.S. Census Bureau released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). Nonresidential spending fell 1.9 percent from December to $698.4 billion on a seasonally adjusted, annualized basis. This represents the first month total nonresidential construction spending dipped below $700 billion since July 2016.
Despite the monthly setback, year-over-year progress remains intact, with nonresidential spending increasing 1.5 percent since January 2016. However, in real terms, that represents virtually nonexistent growth. Private nonresidential spending remained unchanged for the month, while public sector spending plunged 4.7 percent. The greatest loss in spending volume occurred in the public safety, water supply and conservation and development segments.
“The significant loss in public construction spending momentum is hardly novel,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “For several years, public funding for construction activity has been flat and erratic. Public budgets remain constrained by underfunded pensions, surging Medicaid expenditures, and other non-infrastructure-related needs.
“The new president’s speech on Tuesday night discussed the need for additional infrastructure investment,” said Basu. “If the president is able to implement his public-private partnership plan, public construction spending is set to soar. However, there are many obstacles to his plan coming to fruition.

“Private construction spending was also soft in January, but the outlook remains upbeat,” said Basu. “Corporate confidence is high, architects became much busier during the period immediately following the presidential election, and capital from banks and other sources should be broadly available to developers during the year ahead.”

January 2017 Nonresidential Construction Spending

ABC Reports: Construction Lost Jobs in December

National construction employment declined by 3,000 net jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis in December, according to analysis of  U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data released today by the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC).

The industry added 102,000 net new jobs on a year-over-year basis, the smallest increase in more than four years. Of the five subsectors, only residential specialty trade contractors added jobs in December (11,700 net new jobs). Nonresidential construction lost 13,400 net jobs for the month, largely due to losses in heavy and civil engineering, which lost 8,900 jobs. These data are adjusted for seasonal variations, which means that one cannot simply blame the poor job performance on the transition from November to December.

“A terrific nonresidential construction spending report arrived earlier this week, leading to expectations of a more upbeat assessment of the construction employment situation than provided by today’s report,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “The spending report indicated that nonresidential spending expanded to $712.4 billion on a seasonally adjusted, annualized rate in November, representing the highest level of spending in eight years.

“One possible way to reconcile seemingly contradictory data is to point out that construction firms are reporting greater difficulty filling available positions,” said Basu. “More than 80 percent of ABC members report difficulty finding appropriately skilled labor. Accordingly, many construction firms are required to do more with fewer people, which should eventually show up in construction productivity data that reflect the amount of output generated by the average worker on a per-hour-worked basis.

“The significant number of jobs lost in the heavy and civil engineering segment indicates that U.S. spending on infrastructure remains low,” said Basu. “For much of the year, the level of spending in publicly-financed segments was stuck in reverse, and today’s data indicate that increased investment in the shared built environment is much needed.

“There were jobs lost in privately-financed segments as well,” said Basu. “Employment in nonresidential building construction dipped by 1,300 in December. While that’s not a massive loss, it is somewhat surprising given data regarding construction spending, including in the office and lodging segments.”

The construction unemployment rate expanded by 1.7 percentage points in December and stands at 7.4 percent.  This figure, however, is not seasonally adjusted, and construction industry unemployment has increased from November to December during each of the prior sixteen years by an average of 2 percentage points. The national unemployment rate ticked higher to 4.7 percent in December. That statistic is seasonally adjusted.

December 2016 Construction Employment

ABC Reports: Nonresidential Construction Growth on Pace with Strong July Jobs Report

1291931467352794367The U.S. construction industry has rebounded strongly, adding 14,000 net new jobs in July according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). This gain comes after the construction sector lost a combined 27,000 jobs from April to June. The construction industry’s unemployment rate inched lower in July, shedding a tenth of a percentage point to reach 4.5 percent, the industry’s lowest unemployment rate since October 2006.

The nonresidential sector accounted for a majority of July’s gains, adding 11,500 net new jobs. The residential sector remained stagnant for the month, adding only 700 net new positions. Heavy and civil engineering employment, which lost 8,800 jobs from January to June, experienced a modest rebound in July by adding 1,900 net new jobs.

“After several months of disappointing construction spending and employment data, today’s release was most welcome,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “If there is a slowdown in construction, it appears to be in residential as opposed to nonresidential activity. Today’s release provides evidence that the nonresidential construction recovery has not yet stalled.

“While hiring in July was strong both in the broader economy and in key nonresidential construction segments, ongoing job creation exacerbates the issue of rampant skilled labor shortage,” said Basu. “The construction employment rate is now down to 4.5 percent. The implication is that wage pressures continue to build. Therefore, contractors will likely need to more aggressively pass along cost increases to purchasers of construction services in order to simply maintain their current level of profitability.

“For now, America’s economic recovery remains in place,” said Basu. “Not only does the economy continue to add jobs, but labor force participation has begun to rise again. This should position America’s ongoing consumer-led expansion to continue, creating demand for commercial construction and other forms of construction in the process.”

The economy-wide unemployment rate remained unchanged at 4.9 percent. The nation’s labor force expanded by 407,000 persons for the month. This represents the largest growth for the month of July since the labor force expanded by 587,000 persons in July 1996.

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Additional ABC Economic Analysis:

Construction Spending

Construction Employment

 

ABC Reports: Nonresidential Construction Spending Down Again in June, First Annual Decline Since 2013

1291931467352794367Nonresidential construction spending dipped 1 percent in June and has now contracted for three consecutive months according to analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data released today by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). Nonresidential spending, which totaled $682 billion on a seasonally adjusted, annualized rate, has fallen 1.1 percent on a year-over-year basis, marking the first time nonresidential spending has declined on an annual basis since July 2013.

“On a monthly basis, the numbers are not as bad as they seem, as May’s nonresidential construction spending estimate was revised higher. However, this fails to explain the first year-over-year decline in nearly three years,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “There are many forces at work, most of them negative, with the noteworthy exception of construction materials prices, which are down on a year-over-year basis. To the extent that savings are being passed along to purchasers of construction services, spending would appear lower in dollar terms than when measured in physical terms such as square footage.

“Thanks in part to the investment of foreign capital in America, spending related to office space and lodging are up by more than 16 percent year-over-year,” said Basu. The global economy is weak, and international investors are searching for yield and stability. U.S. commercial real estate has become a popular destination for foreign capital. However, the weakness of the global economy may also help explain the decline in manufacturing-related construction spending of nearly 5 percent for the month and more than 10 percent year-over-year.

“Though many contractors continue to report extensive backlog, the data suggest that average firm backlog may begin to retrench,” warned Basu. “The only significant driver of economic growth in America presently is consumer spending. Corporate profits remain stagnant and business investment remains underwhelming. Public sector spending does not appear positioned to accelerate anytime soon despite the passage of a federal highway bill last year.”

Precisely half of the 16 nonresidential subsectors expanded in June. Two of the largest subsectors—manufacturing and commercial—experienced significant contractions in June, however, and were responsible for a majority of the dip in spending.

Tepid spending by public agencies also continues to shape the data. Despite a monthly pick-up in spending, water-supply construction spending is down 14 percent on a year-over-year basis. Public safety construction spending is down 8.4 percent from a year ago, sewage and waste disposal by nearly 15 percent, highway and street by about 6 percent, education by 4 percent and transportation by more than 3 percent.

Chart_8_1_16 Spending_8_1_16

To see more visit:

http://www.abc.org/NewsMedia/ConstructionEconomics/ConstructionEconomicUpdate/tabid/270/categoryid/46/Default

ABC Reports: Nonresidential Construction Hiring Surges

CEU2“The U.S. economy added an average of 289,000 jobs per month during the final three months of 2014, indicating that momentum is surging as we transition into 2015.”—ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.

Construction employment december 2014The U.S. construction industry added 48,000 jobs in December, including 22,800 jobs in nonresidential construction, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) preliminary estimate released Jan. 9. November’s estimate was unchanged in this release, remaining at 20,000 net new construction jobs, but nonresidential construction’s November jobs figure was upwardly revised to 7,100 jobs.

“The U.S. economy added an average of 289,000 jobs per month during the final three months of 2014, indicating that momentum is surging as we transition into 2015,” said Associated Builders and Contractors Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “This represents good news for the construction industry in 2015 and perhaps beyond, particularly with respect to office construction, retail construction, and other segments that benefit directly from accelerating job growth and decreasing unemployment. Overall, the economy has built steady momentum since the end of last winter adding an average of 246,000 jobs per month in 2014, an increase of more than 50,000 jobs added per month compared to 2013.”

According to the BLS household survey, the national unemployment rate fell to 5.6 percent in December. This represents the lowest level of unemployment since June 2008. The declining unemployment rate is most likely a result of a labor force that shrank by 273,000 persons in December, after expanding in the previous two months. The labor force participation rate fell by .02 percent and now sits at 62.7 percent.

“One of the most interesting aspects of the report is that construction unemployment ended the year at 8.3 percent on a non-seasonally adjusted basis,” said Basu. “While construction firm executives have been worried for years about the specter of construction skills shortages, the BLS data indicate there are plenty of people looking for jobs in construction. It is likely that many of these prospective workers lack the skills necessary to fill the openings construction firms are seeking to fill or live in areas where construction employment growth is much slower. Normally, high construction unemployment would imply slow rates of wage and compensation increases; however, ABC believes this is not the case. Because of the presence of skills mismatches, wage gains are likely to be sizeable in 2015 even in the presence of lofty rates of construction unemployment.”

Construction employment for the month and the past year breaks down as follows:

  • Nonresidential building construction employment expanded by 10,000 for the month and is up by 23,400 jobs, or 3.4 percent, since December 2013.
  • Residential building construction employment expanded by 800 jobs in December and is up by 44,500 jobs, or 7 percent, on an annual basis.
  • Nonresidential specialty trade contractors added 12,800 jobs for the month and employment in that category is up by 76,900 jobs, or 3.7 percent, from the same time one year ago.
  • Residential specialty trade contractors gained 12,700 jobs in December and have added 87,600 jobs, or 5.6 percent, since December 2013.
  • The heavy and civil engineering construction segment gained 11,600 jobs in December and job totals are up by 57,900, or 6.6 percent, on a year-over-year basis.

To view the previous employment report, click here.