Tag Archive for 'pavement'

Rebootonline.com Reports Construction had seen a -6.6% decrease in hiring since 2018

  • Gross hiring across all US industries has shown a -2.9% decrease compared to the beginning of 2018.
  • Interestingly, the industry with the largest increase in hiring was ‘Public Safety’at+6.4%.
  • Other prominent public service sectors, including ‘Education and ‘Health Care’ has seen a decrease in hiring with -5.9% and -3.2% retrospectively.
  • The industry that has had the largest decrease in hiring year-on-year was ‘Arts’ with -13.7%.
  • The‘Construction’ industry has had a decreaseof-6.6% in hiring year-on-year.


According to the most recent report by the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, businesses posted nearly 7.6 million jobs at the beginning of 2019, indicating a shift within the labor market. Despite this, there are currently around 1 million more open jobs than there are unemployed workers.

Interestingly, however, the unemployment rate remains unchanged at 3.8 percent as of March 2019, with the number of unemployed people in the US equating to around 6.2 million.

To explore the subject further, digital marketing agency Reboot Digital Marketing analyzed the latest findings found within the report ‘The Workforce Report March 2019’by LinkedIn* to further understand the industries with the largest hiring shifts over the last year.

According to the report, over 155 million US workers have LinkedIn profiles, with over 3 million new jobs posted on the site every month. However, despite this, gross hiring across all US industries was down -2.9% compared to February 2018.


Despite the evolution of technology, it seems the demand for more traditional/public service positions will not be disappearing anytime soon. Remarkably, a surprising industry that has seen the highest increase in hiring is ‘Public Safety’ at +6.4% year-on-year.

Despite the substantial positive increase for this sector, both ‘Education and ‘Health Care’ has seen a decrease in hiring with -5.9% and -3.2% retrospectively.

Ranking just after ‘Public Safety’, Reboot Digital Marketing can also reveal the next five industries that had the highest notable increase in hiring between February 2018- 2019 were:

Software and I.T Services(+4.6%), Corporate Services(+4%), Public Administration(+2.1%), and bothWellness & Fitness, and Transportation & Logistics with +0.5%.

At the other end of the scale, Reboot Digital Marketing found that the following ten industrieshad thelargestmost notable decreasesin hiring from 2018-2019:

Arts
(-13.7%),Agriculture (-11.1%),Consumer Goods (-8.4%),Retail (-8.1%),Hardware & Networking (-7.7%),Entertainment (-7.7%),Construction and Manufacturing (-6.6%) andfinally Design as well as Real Estate with -6%.

Shai Aharony, Managing Director of Rebootonline.com commented:

“Our digital agency has grown over the last two years and recruiting skilled people is essential to our expansion. We have large numbers of candidates applying for roles; however, they often do not possess the correct skills or relevant work experience in the IT and marketing field. If you are looking for employment in a particular industry, make sure your CV reflects your talent in this area. Take a course or gain additional qualifications relevant to the job role which makes you enticing to prospective employers. Internships and work experience are also valuable tools to gain knowledge and bridge the skills gap.”

*Methodology: “Hiring rate” is the count of hires divided by the total number of LinkedIn members in the US. The count of hires is those that have added a new employer to their profile in the same month the new job began. The figures represent the year on year percentage change between February 2018 to February 2019.

Information and graphic, courtesy of  Rebootonline.com

https://www.rebootonline.com/

ARTBA Calls for New Approach to Roadway Safety

Wekiva Parkway under construction in Central Florida. Photo: Mary Brooks.

By Mark Holan, editorial director, ARTBA

ARTBA is calling for a shift in how the nation approaches roadway safety. The association April 9 submitted its views to U.S. House Highways and Transit subcommittee hearing.

Rather than the usual federal focus on reducing the number of crashes by improving motorists’ behavior, ARTBA believes the premise must be turned around to accept the fact that some drivers will inevitably make mistakes. On all major routes—and others to the extent practicable—the U.S. roadway system must anticipate user error and be designed, constructed, equipped and operated to forgive the errant user and protect the innocent worker, pedestrian, cyclist or other drivers, ARTBA’s written testimony says.

“We have the technology and ‘know how’ to build our roadway system to anticipate user error,” ARTBA’s testimony says. “It can be designed, constructed, equipped, and operated to forgive the errant user and protect the innocent victim.”

More than 37,000 people were killed in 2017 U.S. traffic crashes, including roadway workers, cyclists, and pedestrians. Work zone fatalities increased to 799 in 2017 from 586 in 2010. (2018 data is not available.)

ARTBA’s testimony emphasizes highway work zone safety. It reminds Congress that through federal rulemaking after the SAFETEA-LU surface transportation law and further provisions in both the MAP-21 and FAST Act laws, lawmakers and previous administrations have expressed the intent to use increased positive separation between workers and motorists on construction projects.

“The law has not been fully implemented and positive separation is still not used as regularly as Congress intended,” ARTBA’s testimony says. “New products and technologies are available that make the practice more practical and cost-effective.”

ARTBA has previously called for the repeal of a century-old federal procurement rule that has become a major regulatory roadblock to new technologies that promise to help advance safety and alleviate traffic congestion.

ARTBA’s testimony also notes that sound investment in safe transportation infrastructure is a bipartisan priority. The association is urging Congress and the administration to pass a permanent, sustainable revenue solution for the Highway Trust Fund, either as part of broad infrastructure legislation or next year’s scheduled reauthorization of the FAST Act.

World of Asphalt, AGG1 Academy and Expo Host Record-Setting Attendance

IEDA Independent Dealers Unite for Annual Orlando Events

Let’s Talk About Roads

Let’s Talk About Roads

By Greg Sitek

There are things that we, as a society, have developed a need for, a need that readily translates into a necessity of the same magnitude as air, food, and water. In fact, as we currently exist the elimination of the human-made necessities will eliminate the three basics.

Think about it. Think about life as you know and live it without electricity, running water, cable/internet, sewerage systems, stores, roads, cars, trucks, trains, ships, airplanes, gas, oil, etc. etc. etc. When I try to I find that I am in deep trouble.

All of these “needs” are intricately intertwined much like a spider’s web, one “need” supporting the other. In today’s world the linking, supporting “spider web” is our transportation infrastructure, our roads. Take the roads away and everything we “need” to continue living as we do can no longer exist as we do. Each and every component is dependent on our roads for its continued, long-term existence.

Roads are the arteries that provide the means to install and maintain our electricity, cables, phones, waterlines; roads are the web-strands that bring groceries, clothing, stuff to our stores; roads bring farm products to the processors; roads make our lives possible.

We use them, we complain about them, we take them for granted. But we need them and we need to maintain them.

Many of the states have increased their “gas taxes” while others are introducing bills to do the same.

A recent ARTBA Transportation Investment Advocacy Center  (TIAC) release noted, “ Legislators in 37 states have introduced 185 bills aimed at boosting transportation investment in the first two months of 2019,

a new analysis finds. This number is higher than the amount of legislation the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s Transportation Investment Advocacy Center (ARTBA-TIAC) tracked over the same time period last year and is projected to grow as additional measures are introduced throughout the year.

“Continuing a trend seen in recent years, many states introduced electric vehicle fees to help ensure all vehicles that create wear and tear on roads pay for their share of maintenance. Sixteen states filed legislation to implement an electric vehicle registration fee, with 10 of those states including an additional registration fee for hybrid vehicles.

“Several states are also considering innovative funding solutions. Mileage-based user fee studies or pilot programs are being considered in eight states. Four states have introduced legislation to implement tolling.

“Of the legislation introduced in January or February, 19 measures have advanced beyond one legislative chamber, with one bill—an electric vehicle registration fee increase in Wyoming— signed into law. Another bill in Arkansas to convert the state’s flat excise tax to a variable-rate formula based on the average wholesale price of fuel, implement new electric and hybrid motor vehicle registration fees, and utilize at least $35 million in casino revenues for transportation funding has been sent to the governor and is expected to receive final approval in March. One hundred sixty-six bills have been introduced and are awaiting further action. Several states have not yet convened for their legislative session, and at least one state—Alabama—is expected to file a significant transportation investment bill.”

Since this information was released Wisconsin’s governor has a proposed bill to increase the state’s fuel tax and consider other long-term possibilities to insure continued funding for Wisconsin’s roads. Michigan’s governor has announced plans for introducing a 45-cent per gallon gas tax increase to fund meeting its highway need.

The TIAC report points out the fact that along with fuel tax increases some states are considering tolls, vehicle mileage taxes, increased licensing fees and are open to other suggestions this due to the increased number of electric, hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles on the roads. This is an issue that needs to be addressed on a federal level as well as locally.

Another issue that needs to be addressed is ensuring road-users that the monies collected for highway maintenance are spent for highway maintenance. Too often the collected revenue ends up in the general fund and never get spent on filling potholes, widening narrow roads or building new ones.

Roads are a lifeline of our country and our way of life. Since you use them and you depend on them make sure you are involved with their future…