Tag Archive for 'roads'

National Equipment Dealers, LLC Acquires Three Independent Equipment Dealers in Fastest Growing Regions in the USA

National Equipment Dealers, LLC Acquires Three Independent Equipment Dealers in Fastest Growing Regions in the USA

In a multi-faceted transaction that closed on Friday, January 5, National Equipment Dealers acquired Four Seasons Equipment, May Heavy Equipment, and Earthmovers Equipment, as well as some assets of International Iron.

This is a truly exceptional opportunity for NED to expand in what is recognized as the three fastest growing economic areas in the US: Texas (Houston and Dallas), the Carolinas (Raleigh, Lexington, Charlotte, Columbia, Greenville/Spartanburg, Charleston) and Florida (Orlando).

Financing for the merger and ongoing operations was supplied by a syndication of four banks led by BOK Financial. The other participating banks are Fifth Third Bank, Bank of the West and First Tennessee Bank.

Mitch Nevins, CEO, and Kerry Vickar, Chairman, state that employees of each company are expected to continue their respective jobs in the same previous manner as no operational changes will be made upon bringing these businesses together. They believe collective success will be realized by all employees working together, sharing best business practices and equipment fleets, and benefitting from the synergies of a larger company footprint.

Collectively NED represents 10 major manufacturers across a three-state territory, each embracing the combined operations in NED. It is expected that there will be a significant growth in size, both in terms of the number of locations and employees, as well as by geographic diversification, that will provide substantially enhanced opportunities for them as well as NED.

Industry Professionals from 34 States on Roster of “Safety Certified” Transportation Project Professionals

Industry professionals from 34 states, representing 43 companies and state agencies have earned the “Safety Certification for Transportation Project Professionals™” (SCTPP) credential between the September 2016 launch and December 2017, the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) Foundation announced today.  The certification is valid for three years.

The SCTPP program is aimed at the thousands of transportation project workers, supervisors, foremen, inspectors, managers, manufacturers and materials suppliers, designers, equipment operators and owners who could make a huge, industry-wide safety impact by learning core competencies necessary to identify and mitigate potentially life-threatening on-site risks.

The list of “Safety Certified Transportation Project Professionals” includes:

  • Juan Abrigo, Area Safety Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Irving, TX
  • Jes Allen, Superintendent, Zachry Construction Corporation, Cornelius, NC
  • David Asselin, Safety Director, Ranger Construction Industries, Port St. Lucie, FL
  • Harvey Baggett, Corporate Safety Director, J. F. Shea Construction, Inc., Stephens City, VA
  • Mannie Barnes, Construction Manager, Atkinson Construction, Kent, WA
  • Tyler Bean, HSE Regional Manager, Allan Myers, Worcester, PA
  • Trenton Beeler, Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Sherman, TX
  • Tim Beguin, Corporate Safety Director, Wiregrass Construction Company, Inc., Decatur, AL
  • Raymond Berrios, Safety Director, Ranger Construction Industries, West Palm Beach, FL
  • Peter Berrios, Safety Director SE Region,  OHL Community Asphalt, Miami, FL
  • Jason Boland, Project Engineer II, Allan Myers, Virginia Beach,  VA
  • Robert Boyle, Construction Manager, MBP, Shawboro, NC
  • Tyler Bradford, Senior Construction Engineer, Parsons, Fresno, CA
  • Josh Brown, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Williamsburg, VA
  • Travis Browning, Field Safety Manager, Superior Construction Company, Jacksonville, FL
  • Kenneth Burge,  Area Safety Manager, J.D. Abrams, L.P., Santa Fe, TX
  • Dennis Burks, Safety Director, HNTB Corporation, Kansas City, MO
  • Ruben Canales, Sr., Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Richmond, TX
  • Javier Cano, Safety Coordinator,  Zachry Construction Corporation, San Antonio, TX
  • Mickey Carr, Safety Director, Chemung Contracting, Mitchells, VA
  • James Deacon, Safety Manager, Allen Myers, Coopersburg, PA
  • Robert Clark, Project Manager, Superior Construction Company Southeast, LLC., Jacksonville, FL
  • Keith Clay, Safety Manager, John R. Jurgensen Company, Hamilton, OH
  • Sean Conard, Fleet Safety Director, Allan Myers, Williamsburg, VA
  • Brian Connolly, Regional Equipment Manager, Superior Construction Company, Frankfort, IL
  • David Cope, Environmental Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Rockwall, TX
  • David Dostaler, Corporate HSE Director, Kraemer North America, LLC,  Castle Rock, CO
  • Bruce Drewes, Instructional Consultant, 3T Group, Boise, ID
  • Steven Durbin, Area Safety Manager, The Lane Construction Corp, Follansbee, WV
  • Arthur  Emerson, Safety Director, Bryant Contracting INC., Toano, VA
  • Charles Esmacher, Field Representative, HNTB Michigan, Grosse Pointe Park, MI
  • Daniel  Estry, SR Safety Supervisor, LANE, Lakeland, FL
  • John Farrell, Regional HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Pottstown, PA
  • Colin Faulkner, Safety Director, ATS Construction, Lexington, KY
  • Michael Ferry, Safety Director, O&G Industries, West Hartford, CT
  • William French, Sr., Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Dallas, TX
  • Christopher Frum, Safety Manager, Wagman Heavy Civil, Petersburg, VA
  • Alfred Garcia, Project Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Port Lavaca, TX
  • Cory Gaye, Corporate Safety Director, Wagman, York, PA
  • Christopher Gilsdorf, Safety Engineer, Kraemer North America, Madison, WI
  • Christine Goins, Assistant Resident Engineer, RK&K, Wake Forest, NC
  • Pastor Gonzalez, Project Administrator, RK&K, Cutler Bay, FL
  • David Graham, Corporate Safety Director, B.A.T.S. Traffic Solutions, Anaheim, CA
  • Jennica Greffe, Project Manager, Superior Construction, Jacksonville, FL
  • Michael Grisko, Instructor, Local 172 SET, Folsom, NJ
  • Seth Hall, Field Safety Manager, Superior Construction, West Palm Beach, FL
  • Brody Hambright, Survey, Wright Brothers, Charleston, TN
  • Jeff Hanson, Vice President HSE & Risk, United Infrastructure Group, Inc., Great Falls, SC
  • Tony Hemmerly, Assistant Project Manager, Superior Construction Company SE, Jacksonville, FL
  • Randy Henson, Division Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Grand Prairie, TX
  • Adam Hill, Safety Coordinator,  Road-Con Inc., West Chester, PA
  • James Hinkle, Lead Engineer, MBP, Salem, VA
  • Justin Hobson, Safety Director, Talley Construction, Chattanooga, TN
  • Christopher Hughes, Project Engineer, Ohio Department of Transportation, Delphos, OH
  • Chris Iungerich, Safety Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., San Antonio, TX
  • Elisha Johnson, Field Manager,  Allan Myers, Richmond, VA
  • Gunnar Johnson, Field Engineer, Zachry Construction Corporation, Houston, TX
  • Nick Kaminer, Engineer, Key Constructors, LLC, Madison, MS
  • Peter Kaplan, Project Safety Manager, Wagman Heavy Civil, Baltimore, MD
  • Bruce Kay, Vice President of Construction Services, AECOM, Sewell, NJ
  • Edward Kernaghan, Vice President/General Manager, J F Shea Construction, Red Bluff, CA
  • Lucas Kessling, Project Manager, The Lane Construction Corporation, Shorewood, IL
  • Mindy King, EHS, RK Hall, LLC, Texarkana, AR
  • Matthew, Koss, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Baltimore, MD
  • Joseph Landino, Safety Director, Ajax Paving Industries, Inc., Troy, MI
  • Billy Laney, Safety Manager, Wiregrass Construction, Double Springs, AL
  • Evan Lawrence, Project Manager, Superior Construction Company, Panama City Beach, FL
  • Don Lindert, Jr., Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Ovilla, TX
  • Gregory Linenfelser, HSE Professional, Transurban, Alexandria, VA
  • Matt Lunzman, Superintendent, Hawkins Construction, Lincoln, NE
  • Thomas Maier, Risk Advisor, IMA Inc., Raymore, MO
  • Francis B. Maline, Project Safety Manager, Lane Construction Corporation, Westchester, IL
  • Jose Manzano, Safety Inspector, CW Roberts Contracting, Tallahassee, FL
  • Thomas  Markle, Area Safety Manager, Lane Construction, Windsor, ME
  • Eli Martinez, Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Dallas, TX
  • Timothy Maxwell, Project Engineer, Wright Brothers Construction Company, Inc., Asheville, NC
  • Edward Mays, Field Safety Coordinator, Barriere Construction LLC, Metairie, LA
  • Tobias Mazzoni, Project Manager, Superior Construction, Jacksonville, FL
  • Russell McElroy, Senior Safety Supervisor, Lane Construction, Charlotte, NC
  • Joel McGlothlin, Area Safety Manager, Austin Commercial, Mansfield, TX
  • Matthew McMillan, Project Manager, Kiewit Infrastructure South Co, Peachtree City, GA
  • Robert Medina, Safety Officer, Hellman Electric Corporation, Bronx, NY
  • Seth Medwick, Department Head, HNTB, New York City, NY
  • Sue Mendoza, Senior Safety Supervisor, The Lane Construction Corporation, Justin, TX
  • James Milner, Project Manager, Superior Construction Company Southeast, LLC., Jacksonville, FL
  • Mason Mimnaugh, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Philadelphia, PA
  • Robert Montel, Safety Manager, Rieth-Riley Construction Co., Inc., Goshen, IN
  • Mauricio Montoya, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Richmond, VA
  • Robert Munoz, Senior Safety Supervisor, The Lane Construction Corporation, Lakeland, FL
  • John Calvin Myers, RK&K, Richmond, VA
  • Anthony Nanfro, Superintendent, Zachry Construction Corporation, Magnolia, TX
  • Frank Nesbitt, Senior Safety Supervisor, Lane Construction, West Columbia, SC
  • Gregory Nowak, Safety Representative, J.F. Shea Construction, Valparaiso, IN
  • Frank Ortega, Safety Manager, Superior Construction Company, Orlando, FL
  • William Pedigo, Safety Director, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Irving, TX
  • Timothy Penrose, Senior Civil Engineer, PA Department of Transportation, Bethlehem, PA
  • Todd Pfeiffer, VP Safety, Preferred Materials, Inc., Land O Lakes, FL
  • Ron Phillips, Sr. Safety Supervisor, Lane Construction Corporation, Fredericksburg, VA
  • Joseph Polansky, Director of HSE, Fred Smith Construction, Raleigh, NC
  • Stephanie Powers, Area Safety Manager, Lane Construction Corporation, Falls Church, VA
  • Darrell Pruitt, Regional Safety Director, Superior Construction Company, Montezuma, IN
  • David Putnam, HSE Manager,  Allan Myers, Havre de Grace, MD
  • Roger Rister, Safety Manager, Parsons Construction Group, Crown Point, IN
  • David Roberson, Building Division Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Seguin, TX
  • Emmett Russell, Safety Training Consultant, Safety Training Consultant, Upper Marlboro, MD
  • Richard Salcido, EHS Manager, The Ashton Company, Tucson, AZ
  • Mark Sanders, Safety Manager, HDR/ICA, Barlow, KY
  • Mike Scarborough, Senior Safety Director, Ranger Construction Industries, Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
  • Doug Schultz,  President, Herlihy Mid-Continent Company, Romeoville, IL
  • Michael D. Scolforo, Area Safety Manager, The Lane Construction Corporation, Lee, MA
  • John Scurek, Safety, Health & Environmental Manager, Parsons, Georgetown, TX
  • Jacob Selby, Field Engineer, Zachry Construction Corporation, North Richland Hills, TX
  • Khanjan Shah, Construction Project Engineer, RK&K, Laurel, MD
  • David Sherwood, CEO, Sherwood Construction, Tulsa, OK
  • Jeffrey Sienkiewicz, Project Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, Flower Mound, TX
  • Sean Simpson, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Baltimore, MD
  • Erick Smith, Project Manager, The Lane Construction Corporation, Shorewood, IL
  • Bruce Sparrow, Project Engineer, Ooltewah, TN
  • Randy Spurlock, Safety Manager, Allan Myers, Bel Air, MD
  • Clay Stark, Project Manager,  Austin Bridge & Road, Midlothian, TX
  • Terry Stephens, Area Safety Manager, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Irving, TX
  • Don Stephens, Safety Manager, Zachry Construction Corporation, San Antonio, TX
  • Alissa Sternagle, Area Safety Manager, Lane Construction, Charlotte, NC
  • Bryan Stone, Safety Director, Superior Construction Company, Jacksonville, FL
  • Chad Stone, EH&S Manager, RK Hall LLC- Summit Materials, Paris, TX
  • Michelle Teets, Mid-Atlantic Regional Safety Manager, Lane Construction Corporation, Norfolk, VA
  • Justin Templet, Safety and Claims Coordinator, Barriere Construction, Metairie, LA
  • Nathan Terry, Structures Superintendent, Zachry Construction Corporation, Porter, TX
  • William Tyson, Director Labor Relations, General Contractors Association of NY, New York, NY
  • Cheyenne Urban, Safety Representative, Austin Bridge & Road, L.P., Frisco, TX
  • Steven Ward, Safety Director, Advanced Workzone Services LLC, Muskogee, OK
  • Joseph Warren, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Virginia Beach, VA
  • Douglas Westervelt, Director of Safety Operations, Crossland Construction Company, Columbus, KS
  • Justin White, Senior Project Manager/Estimator, Barriere Construction, Covington, LA
  • Derek  Yeckel, HSE Specialist, Allan Myers, Fredericksburg, VA
  • Steven Yeckel, HSE Manager, Allan Myers, Stafford, VA
  • Joseph Yuhas, Technical Consultant, Liberty Mutual Insurance, Minneapolis, MN
  • Todd Zimmerman, General Superintendent, Crossland Heavy Contractors, Columbus, KS

The two-and-a-half hour exam contains up to 120 multiple-choice questions that probe knowledge in assessing project risks, creating project safety plans, implementing and conducting on-going evaluation of a site-specific operational safety plan, and conducting incident investigations.  It has been designed to meet the rigorous protocols required for accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization ISO/IEC 17024: “Conformity Assessment: General Requirements for Bodies Operating Certification of Persons.”

Eight courses to help prep for the exam are available via the ARTBA Online Learning Center (OLC).

Additional information about the SCTPP credential and the OLC can be found at www.puttingsafetyfirst.org.

The ARTBA Foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entity established in 1985, supports a wide portfolio of programs and activities, including educational scholarships, awards programs, professional development courses, safety training, a national exhibition on transportation and a facility dedicated to improving safety in roadway construction zones.

Atlas Copco renames Construction Equipment North America LLC to Power Technique North America LLC

Atlas Copco has announced Power Technique North America LLC as the new name of Construction Equipment North America LLC, effective January 1, 2018.

Power Technique was chosen as the name because U.S. and Canadian customers recognize power as the defining characteristic of the core product categories in the portfolio: air, power (including light) and flow.

The business area will serve multiple segments, including construction, industrial, drilling, oil and gas and petrochemicals. It will continue to comprise the Atlas Copco, Chicago Pneumatic and American Pneumatic Tools brands.

“Our commitment to the construction industry is as strong as ever,” said Scott Carnell, President of Power Technique North America. “However, we also serve customers in many other segments. The Power Technique name more accurately encompasses this and our overall product offering.”

Moving forward, Power Technique North America will offer products including portable compressors, generators, light towers and pumps along with dedicated construction products including handheld pneumatic, electric and hydraulic tools, and customized solutions.

The name change follows three 2017 Atlas Copco moves:

  • The divestment of the Atlas Copco Road Construction Equipment Division — including Dynapac rollers, pavers, and planers — to French industrial and construction company Fayat Group.
  • The announcement of a planned 2018 split into two companies, with Atlas Copco and new company Epicor focusing on mining, infrastructure and national resources customers.
  • The agreement, announced Dec. 22, to divest its concrete and compaction business to Husqvarna Group’s Construction Division. The divestment is subject to regulatory approvals and is expected to be completed during the first quarter of 2018. Products include complete ranges for concrete and compaction.

“The evolution to Power Technique will enable us to focus on our three pillars — air, power, and flow,” Carnell said. “We will continue to provide on-site products and solutions that power sustainable productivity for our customers.”

The Power Technique North America corporate office remains at the company’s new facility in Rock Hill, South Carolina and continues to support customers through dedicated service centers throughout North America. For more information, visit www.atlascopco.us or call (800) 732-6762.

Atlas Copco is a world-leading provider of sustainable productivity solutions. The Group serves customers with innovative compressors, vacuum solutions and air treatment systems, construction and mining equipment, power tools and assembly systems. Atlas Copco develops products and services focused on productivity, energy efficiency, safety and ergonomics.  The company was founded in 1873, is based in Stockholm, Sweden, and has a global reach spanning more than 180 countries. In 2016, Atlas Copco had revenues of BSEK 101 (BEUR 11) and about 45,000 employees. Learn more at www.atlascopcogroup.com.

Atlas Copco’s Power Technique business area provides air, power and flow solutions through products such as mobile compressors, pumps, light towers and generators, along with a number of complementary products. It also offers specialty rental and provides services through a dedicated, global network. Power Technique innovates for sustainable productivity across multiple industries, including construction, manufacturing, oil and gas and exploration drilling. The business area is headquartered in Belgium. Product development and manufacturing units are located in Europe, Asia, South America and North America.

 

Three Next Generation Cat® Excavators Deliver More Choices for Increased Efficiency and Lower Operating Costs in 20-Ton Size Class

Cat 320 HEX digging foundations

Three Next Generation 20-ton size class excavators from Caterpillar—the 320 GC, 320 and 323—increase operating efficiency, lower fuel and maintenance costs, and improve operator comfort compared to previous models. The new excavators offer unique combinations of purpose-built features designed to match customers’ productivity and cost targets.

Still the 20-ton class standard, the new Cat® 320 raises the bar for efficiency with integrated Cat Connect Technology that advances productivity gains. Standard technology combined with lower fuel and maintenance costs deliver low-cost production in medium- to heavy-duty applications.

Designed for low- to medium-duty applications, the new Cat 320 GC combines the right balance of productivity features with reduced fuel consumption and maintenance costs. The result is high reliability and low cost-per-hour performance.

Cat 320GC HEX working

Delivering high production performance, the new premium Cat 323 boasts standard integrated Cat Connect Technology and the most power and lift capacity in the line. These features combine with lower fuel consumption and reduced maintenance costs to deliver maximum productivity at the lowest cost.

Technology boosts efficiency by up to 45 percent                            

The new Cat 320 and 323 boast the industry’s highest level of standard factory-equipped technology to boost productivity. Both models are equipped with integrated Cat Connect Technology, which increases operating efficiency by up to 45 percent over traditional grading operations.

Offering guidance for depth, slope and horizontal distance to grade, the Cat Grade with 2D system helps operators reach the desired grade quickly and accurately. Using the system’s E-fence feature enables the machine to work safely under structures or near traffic by preventing any part of the excavator from moving outside operator-defined set points. The standard 2D system can be upgraded to Cat Grade with Advanced 2D or Cat Grade with 3D.

Standard Grade Assist automates boom, stick and bucket movements, so operators stay on grade simply and effortlessly with single-lever digging. Cat Payload on-board weighing, integrated on the Cat 320 and 323 at the factory, delivers precise load targets and increased loading efficiency with on-the-go weighing and real-time payload estimates without swinging to prevent truck over/under-loading. Cat LINK™ hardware and software connect job sites to the office and provide customers with machine-critical operating information.

Fuel savings reaching 25 percent
Durable Cat engines provide duty-matched power ratings from 121 to 162 hp (90 to 121 kW) for the three new excavators. The efficient Next Generation machines consume 20 to 25 percent less fuel than the previous, corresponding models. New Smart mode operation automatically matches engine and hydraulic power to digging conditions, optimizing both fuel consumption and performance. Engine speed is automatically lowered when there is no hydraulic demand to further reduce fuel usage.

Cat 323 HEX working

More efficient than single-fan systems, the new cooling system employs multiple electric fans, which independently monitor hydraulic oil, radiator and air-to-air aftercooler temperatures to deliver the exact airflow required. With a new hydraulic system built for responsiveness and efficiency, the Cat 320 GC, 320 and 323 feature a new main control valve that eliminates the need for pilot lines, reduces pressure losses and lowers fuel consumption. Fewer hydraulic lines on the excavators result in 20 percent less oil required, lowering long-term operating costs.

Maintenance costs reduced as much as 15 percent

Offering extended and more synchronized maintenance intervals, the new Cat excavators do more work at a lower cost and reduce maintenance costs by up to 15 percent over the previous series. Featuring higher dirt capacity, the new Cat hydraulic return filter boasts a 3,000-hour service life, a 50 percent increase over previous filters. A new Cat air filter with integrated pre-cleaner and primary and secondary filters extends service life to 1,000 hours, a 100 percent increase over previous designs, while a new fuel tank cap filter extends service life to 2,000 hours. The three fuel system filters each offer a 500-hour service interval.

All daily maintenance checks for engine oil, fuel water separator, fuel tank water and sediment, and cooling system level are performed from ground level, making the routine faster, easier and safer. Consolidated filter locations reduce service time. 

New cab designed to enhance operator performance

Cat 323 HEX setting pipe

All Next Generation Cat Excavator cabs come equipped with standard features like keyless push-button start, large standard 8” (203-mm) touchscreen monitor with jog dial keys for control and sound-suppressed rollover protective structures (ROPS) to offer the next level of operator comfort, safety, and quiet operation. Programmable joystick buttons for response and pattern allow the operator to dial in productivity settings. New advanced viscous mounts reduce cab vibration by up to 50 percent over previous models to reduce operator fatigue.

Equipped with a choice of Comfort, Deluxe or Premium cab packages, the new spacious cab features a low-profile design and large front, rear and side windows to enhance visibility to the front and side of the excavator. Optional 360-degree visibility combines images from multiple machine-mounted cameras to enhance the operator’s sight-lines in all directions. Automatic climate control maintains internal cab temperature settings, regardless of external ambient temperatures. A Bluetooth® integrated radio with USB ports for connecting and charging phones bring creature comforts from the home to the operator’s office. A tilt-up console for the Deluxe and Premium cab designs affords easy cab entry and exit.

For more information about Cat Next Generation Hydraulic Excavators, contact the local Cat dealer or go to www.cat.com

 

Cat 320, 320GC, 323 HEX

Next Generation Cat Excavators Product Specifications

                                          320 GC 320 323
Engine Cat C4.4 ACERT™ Cat C4.4 ACERT™ Cat C7.1 ACERT™
Gross Power (ISO 14396) 121 hp (90 kW) 162 hp (121 kW) 162 hp (121 kW)
Operating weight 48,300 lb
(21 900 kg)
50,100 lb
(22 700 kg)
56,200 lb
(25 500 kg)
Max. digging depth,
{18’ 8” (5.7 m) boom,
9’ 6” (2.9 m) stick}
22’ 1” (6 720 mm) 22’ 1” (6 720 mm) 22’ 1” (6 720 mm)
Max. reach at ground level
{18’ 8” (5.7 m) boom,
9’ 6” (2.9 m) stick}
32’ 4” (9 860 mm) 32’ 4” (9 860 mm) 32’ 5” (9 870 mm)
Max. loading height
{18’ 8” (5.7 m) boom,
9’ 6” (2.9 m) stick}
21’ 4” (6 490 mm) 21’ 4” (6 490 mm) 21’ 3” (6 480 mm)

Tom Ewing’s Environmental Update

*  DOE’s Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued a DOE’s Federal Energy Regulatory Commission last week – the “Grid Resiliency Pricing Rule.”  Because electric energy regulators and policymakers do not use English the way most people do the narrative of energy rulings is frequently puzzling.  One core NOPR issue centers on the dependency and resiliency of old-school power generation – coal, natural gas and hydro versus how “the market” prices and compensates new-school renewable generation.  DOE’s Staff Report writes that markets need further study and reform to address grid reliability and resilience. “System operators are working toward recognizing, defining, and compensating for resource attributes that enhance reliability and resilience (on both the supply and demand side). This is on a fast track: the Secretary has directed the Commission to take final action within 60 days of publication of the proposed rule or to issue the rule as an interim final rule immediately.  Comments are due either November 24 or according to a schedule to be published by the Commission.  Clear on that?
*  Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST-41) established a “permitting dashboard” which is supposed to track all major federal infrastructure projects, from power systems to dams to highways and pipelines.  The dashboard is also supposed to reflect the work of a new FAST-41 Federal Permitting Improvement Steering Council (FPISC).  Both the Council and the dashboard have been on the sidelines for the past 18 months. The setup is more like a library than a control tower.  But changes are in the works including a GSA proposal allowing the Council to collect fees from project sponsors, using the money to keep projects on track, with project performance linked to individual performance reviews.  What?!  No way.  Stay tuned.
*  Last March the Department of Commerce started work on a Presidential directive to study regulatory changes to help expand manufacturing development and investments in the US.  The report was supposed to be concluded in mid-May but DOC just released the report.  It’s worth a close look.  One important suggestion: “There is no regular process for consultations with industry to identify specific actions the federal government can take to eliminate unduly burdensome regulations and accelerate permitting decisions. Thus, the Department recommends creating an annual, open forum for regulators and industry stakeholders to evaluate progress in reducing regulatory burdens.”  [Now, if you-know-who would just stay focused…! *:D big grin ]
 
Tom Ewing
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513-379-5526 voice/text