Tag Archive for 'safety'

Work Hard and the Money Follows

DeNucci Constructors LLC Meets the Challenges of Rapid Growth

By Richard Rybka

Take care of your biggest asset – your employees and customers.”

This statement by Paul DeNucci demonstrates his understanding that empathy is critically important to success in contracting. He has followed this mantra for the past 28 years. Equally important to his business philosophy are the words that has kept his company solvent and prosperous: “Work hard and the money follows.”

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Since 1992, DeNucci has taken his company from a start-up to a highly competitive, multi-functional construction company in a tough market. It took more than a sound business philosophy to move through the ever-changing landscape of construction. Learning the company’s history and transitions will reveal the motivating factors that made his business a true success story.

Starting Out With Chains and Hubs

In 1992, DeNucci founded his company in Austin, Texas. That was back in the day when “technology” was a non-existent term in the construction business. For a site work contractor, that meant slow and tedious tasks for layout, grade staking, blue tops, and as-builts. A tripod-mounted construction level and a grade rod were the most innovative tools available for construction survey work.

Today, DeNucci Constructors LLC is a major player in the Austin construction industry. His company is licensed both as a commercial general building contractor and as a utilities construction company, providing services to public government entities and private customers. DeNucci’s typical mix of construction contracts includes residential subdivisions, assisted living facilities, sanitary and storm sewer systems, urban street improvements, and recreational parks. 

Rapid Growth Spurs Change

As of April 2019, Austin, Texas, is the fastest growing major metropolitan area in the United States. This growth spurt extends well beyond the city center area into five surrounding counties.

A contractor operating in this economic environment faces two challenges – increased competition and pricing pressure. DeNucci was determined to continue the growth of his company in this fast-changing market. Not quite sure of how the future of his company would unfold, he maintained an open mind and an expansive perspective.

“We were always looking for technology and other innovation to help give us an edge and increase production,” DeNucci said. Willingness to explore new options was and continues to be what keeps his company moving into the future. It also gave him the advantage he needed to stay ahead of the competition. 

Expediting the Transition to Technology

Coming from the old school way of doing things, DeNucci admits that he was a “hard sell” when it came to adopting GPS technology. 

He tried integrating GPS into his workflows, but was not having much luck with the first system he purchased. Looking for a better solution, he met John Favret in June 2015. Favret is Senior Machine Control Sales Specialist, based at GeoShack’s store in Austin.

The Austin location is one of 21 stores in eight U.S. states and has the resources to provide a total solution to its customers – the most advance technology products, highly competent sales consultants, and unlimited support.

Favret demoed Topcon’s HiPer V base and rover system to DeNucci, his son, Ryan, and General Superintendent Josh Walenta. With Pocket 3D software on the field controller, it is a perfect solution for layout, grade staking, and collecting as-built information. Quickly seeing how Topcon’s GPS system out-performed his existing system, he made the switch. He noticed a huge improvement in managing his subdivision projects. 

Within a few months, DeNucci became eager to explore machine control systems. He asked Favret to install a Topcon 3D-MC2 on a Caterpillar D8 Dozer. Shortly thereafter, another system was installed on a Caterpillar 140 M3 Motor Grader. 

DeNucci purchased his first Topcon 3D-MCMAX dozer system in August 2017. That was just the beginning. Today, the company owns three 3D-MCMAX-equipped dozers, one 3D-MC2 dozer, two 3D-MC motor graders, and two sets of Hiper V base and rover systems. 

A Typical DeNucci Project

Santa Rita Ranch, a premier master-planned community, is located in Williamson County, Texas. Upon completion of total build-out, the project will include approximately 6,500 homes located in nine distinct villages and more than 200 acres of commercial and multifamily development.

The site work, grading, and excavation required for the project includes construction of numerous water quality ponds, drainage structures, water and wastewater systems, lift stations, curb and gutter, HMAC paving, dry utilities, sidewalks, signage, and other amenities.

DeNucci explained how this complex project showcases the use of Topcon GPS systems for every phase of the massive development:

“Our Topcon equipment has allowed us to localize and seamlessly move from section to section within the subdivision, locate erosion controls and other items of work with our rovers, complete our rough cutting and lot grading operations with our 950 and D10 dozers with machine control followed by our motor graders with their machine control to complete the road base operations and final grading before the final HMAC installation.”

A Word from the Man in the Field

Josh Walenta has been with DeNucci for 13 years and experienced first-hand the growth and changes that have taken place. Walenta is the man who oversees the day-to-day field operations.

Before the company started using machine control systems, they depended on surveyors to set grade stakes and blue tops. Earthmoving and grade work depended on the schedules of others. Equipment and operators were often delayed from making progress on a job while they waited for layout information.

Walenta says the most significant advantages to machine control systems are speed and cost savings. “No waiting on anybody, no scheduling,” he explained. Once others set control points, there is no need for outside consultants.

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Field checking, when necessary, is done with a Topcon HiPer V rover and Pocket 3D software. “Most of the time if there’s a question or problem you can check in on something with an existing elevation, like a manhole or an inlet, and figure out what’s going on – instead of waiting on someone or building it and having to come back and fix it later,” Walenta remarked.

When a Dealer Becomes Part of the Team

All the technology in the world cannot achieve its full potential without knowledgeable support from the supplier. It’s not just about selling a product and answering support phone calls. It’s about seamless integration of technology with the user.

John Favret received the highest compliment that a sales consultant can expect to receive from a customer. “John is an invaluable part of our team and his service after the sell is unmatched in our industry”, said DeNucci. 

GeoShack, Topcon, and Favret give DeNucci the advantage he needs to not just stay competitive, but to thrive in one of the toughest markets. It also gives DeNucci confidence in an ally that can help him control his company’s destiny. 

DeNucci claims an optimistic future for his company: “We look forward to continuing to grow with the Topcon products and utilize the ever-changing technology as they continue to innovate.”

For more information about GeoShack, Topcon GPS products, and Topcon machine control systems, go twww.geoshack.com

This feature appeared in the March 2020 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & Engineer, Construction, Construction Digest, Construction News, Constructioneer, Dixie Contractor, Michigan Contractor & Builder, Midwest Contractor, New England Construction, Pacific Builder & Engineer, Rocky Mountain Construction, Texas Contractor, Western Builder

Turner Construction Teaches Educators About the Industry Through Externship Program

By Jessica Hoover

Last summer, the Rutherford Works Teacher Externship Program paired educators from five middle schools in Rutherford County with five companies in the fields of construction, advanced manufacturing, health care, information technology, and supply chain management. The program is a partnership between the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce and Rutherford County Schools. 

“The goal of the program is to help expose educators – so teachers, counselors, administrators – to the world of work,” said Beth Duffield, Senior Vice President for Education and Workforce Development for Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce. “Most educators don’t have extensive work experience outside the classroom. We want them to become familiar with our employers and some of the challenges that our employers are having in finding a qualified workforce. Ultimately, we want the educators to utilize what they learn from the employers in the classroom to help students learn about careers in the related industry.”

A Multi-Faceted Program

On the first day of the program, all 22 educators from the five schools gathered at the Chamber of Commerce for orientation.

“During our first day with the educators, we give them a deep dive into all things high school,” Duffield said. “We teach them about graduation requirements, early post-secondary opportunities and work-based learning experiences so they are able to talk about what’s next with their eighth graders. We also review all the programs that the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce facilitates with our schools.”

After orientation the teachers are divided into five groups, with each group going to Turner Construction Company, Ingram Content Group, Magneti Marelli (Calsonic), Nissan Group of North America or TriStar StoneCrest. Each company developed its own two-week program independently. 

Turner was the only company in the construction industry. Turner hosted five educators from Christiana Middle School over the course of the two-week program.

Turner’s program involved the educators job shadowing the project engineer, superintendents, safety manager and project manager for the Saint Thomas Rutherford Hospital Tower and Operating Room Expansion in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. 

“Our educators got the opportunity to see the logistics that go into an expansion project at a functioning hospital,” said Paul Lawson, Project Executive for Turner Construction Company. “They took part in daily huddles, scheduling meetings, pricing reviews, submittal reviews and construction activity notice meetings held with the hospital’s engineering and maintenance staff. I think many of them found it eye-opening to see the level of coordination that goes into the work we do.”

“The teachers that worked with Turner last summer learned about safety and quality and teamwork,” Duffield said. “They were exposed to as much hands-on, real-world work as possible.”

Reaching Students Through Educators

The Rutherford Works Teacher Externship Program gives educators real-world experience in STEM-related fields so they can advise students on their educational and career goals. The program aims to increase the number of individuals with both soft and technical skills needed to fill the growing number of jobs in the construction, advanced manufacturing, health care, information technology, and supply chain management industries.

“Ultimately, we’re trying to reach students through these educators,” Lawson said. “We understand that middle school is pretty early to be thinking about a career, but we think it’s beneficial to create awareness of our industry early on, so that when students do start thinking more seriously about a future career, there’s already some familiarity there. … Each teacher who participates in this program could potentially reach 60-plus students per year. By drawing on their firsthand experience through the program, they can help students understand what’s interesting and fulfilling about our work, as well as how skills like math and science can be beneficial in the engineering and construction industries.”

After the two weeks is over, Duffield said that each group of educators identified a problem that they wanted to solve within their school and developed a school-wide implementation plan for sixth, seventh, and eighth grade. Turner’s five educators from Christiana Middle School implemented career and lifestyle exploration throughout all grade levels, along with monthly advocacy projects. They also created a parent pathway night so students and parents could make connections with companies.

“The teachers who took part in the program this year told us that it was very illuminating to see the behind-the-scenes planning and coordination that is involved in our projects and that students seemed to be genuinely interested in hearing about their experiences,” Lawson said. “Because these students are in middle school, we won’t know for years if any of them end up pursuing careers in construction, but our hope is that through this program and similar initiatives, we’ll begin developing our construction workforce of the future.”

The 2020 Teacher Externship Program will be held from June 8-19, and participating teachers will be paid $20 an hour for the two weeks of the program.

This feature appeared in the February 2020 issues of the ACP Magazines:

California Builder & Engineer, Construction, Construction Digest, Construction News, Constructioneer, Dixie Contractor, Michigan Contractor & Builder, Midwest Contractor, New England Construction, Pacific Builder & Engineer, Rocky Mountain Construction, Texas Contractor, Western Builder

ARTBA Announces Four Winners in Annual Student Video Contest

A middle schooler from Washington, a California high school senior, an engineering student from University of California, Davis, and a graduate student from Carnegie Mellon University are winners of the 9th annual American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s (ARTBA) “Student Transportation Video Contest.” They each will receive a $500 cash prize.

Sponsored by ARTBA’s Research & Education (RED) Division, the contest aims to raise awareness about infrastructure issues by challenging students to develop a brief video exploring a topic related to America’s transportation network.

Students from across the country submitted entries in one of two categories: general transportation or transportation safety.  The winners were selected by a panel of ARTBA members and film industry experts. 

Topics covered included electric cars, automated vehicles, safe driving practices, and local transportation projects.

The 2019 winning videos are:

General Transportation Category

Age Group One (Elementary, Middle or High School Students)
“Electric Vehicles” by Dylan Tran. Dylan is a senior at Granada Hills Charter High School in Porter Ranch, California and is part of their STEM program. His video highlights the increased importance of electric cars, outlining how they function, how they affect our environment, and the rise in sales trends in recent years.

Age Group Two (Post-Secondary/College/Graduate Level)
“Transportation Trends” by Rithik Sachdeva, who is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering at The University of California, Davis in Santa Clara, California. His video addresses new transportation trends and technologies, specifically driverless, automated vehicles.

Safety Category

Age Group One (Elementary, Middle or High School Students)
“Car Safety” by Ryan Song. Ryan is an 8th grader at Buena Vista Seventh-day Adventist School in Auburn, Washington. In his animated video, Ryan identifies safe driving practices and habits, sharing tips to avoid accidents and injury to yourself and to others.

Age Group Two (Post-Secondary/College/Graduate Level)
“Training-free Monocular 3D Event Detection System for Traffic Surveillance” by Lijun Yu. Lijun is pursuing a Master’s of Language Technologies at Carnegie Melon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His video presents models for detecting car crashes as well as actions like stopping and U-turns, and future applications.

To see more videos visit ARTBA’s Student Video Contest YouTube Channel.

Established in 1902, Washington, D.C.-based ARTBA is the “consensus voice” of the U.S. transportation design and construction industry before Congress, federal agencies, the White House, news media and the general public.

Asphalt Industry Illuminated in ‘Pave It Black’ Podcast

NAPA’s official podcast engages with asphalt industry
issues, innovations, and personalities

The National Asphalt Pavement Association launches “Pave It Black,” a biweekly podcast highlighting today’s asphalt pavement industry, on February 3, 2020.

Through discussion and interviews with industry leaders, hosts Brett Williams, NAPA Director of Engineering and Technical Services, and NAPA Vice President for Engineering, Research, & Technology Dr. Richard Willis explore challenges, opportunities, and innovations reshaping the ways America’s roads and highways are built. Asphalt Pavement magazine editor Monica Dutcher produces the podcast.

“Podcasting is a great way to open a window on the industry and give a platform to the voices of the people who build roads and further innovation in road building,” said Williams. “They are at the plants, on job sites, and involved in research and development. They are all focused on building the best asphalt pavements possible, and ‘Pave It Black’ lets us help people understand what it takes to get that job done.”

The first season focuses on how asphalt pavement mix producers are putting innovation to use, with interviews with NAPA members, researchers, and suppliers. Episodes will also examine how the asphalt pavement industry is addressing the workforce issues affecting all sectors of construction.

“When people think about jobs in road building, often they focus only on the person holding a flag at the start of a work zone,” said Willis. “Flaggers are an important part of every roadway work zone, but the truth is the asphalt pavement industry offers a wide range of skilled jobs with clear paths for advancement.”

Ten episodes are planned for the first season of “Pave It Black” with new episodes airing every other Monday starting on February 3, 2020. Listeners can subscribe through iTunes, Google Podcast, SoundCloud, Spotify, Stitcher, and TuneIn. Links can be found at www.AsphaltPavement.org/Podcast

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About the National Asphalt Pavement Association

The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) is the only trade association that exclusively represents the interests of the asphalt producer/contractor on the national level with Congress, government agencies, and other national trade and business organizations. NAPA supports an active research program designed to improve the quality of asphalt pavements and paving techniques used in the construction of roads, streets, highways, parking lots, airports, and environmental and recreational facilities. The association provides technical, educational, and marketing materials and information to its members; supplies product information to users and specifiers of paving materials; and conducts training courses. The association, which counts more than 1,200 companies as members, was founded in 1955.

TRIP Reports: VIRGINIA MOTORISTS LOSE $9.5 BILLION PER YEAR ON ROADWAYS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME DESIRABLE SAFETY FEATURES

AS MUCH AS $2,600 PER DRIVER. LACK OF SUSTAINABLE, LONG-TERM FUNDING THREATENS VIRGINIA’S ABILITY TO IMPROVE ROAD AND BRIDGE CONDITIONS, IMPROVE TRAFFIC SAFETY, AND RELIEVE CONGESTION ON A TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM CARRYING GROWING TRAFFIC VOLUMES.

Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost Virginia motorists a total of $9.5 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,583 per driver in some areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. A lack of sustainable, long-term transportation funding threatens Virginia’s ability to improve road and bridge conditions, improve traffic safety, and relieve traffic congestion and could be an impediment to economic growth in the state, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research nonprofit. 

The TRIP report, Virginia Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Virginia, approximately one third of major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor or mediocre condition, more than 600 locally and state-maintained bridges (20 feet or more in length) are rated poor/structurally deficient, and 3,875 people lost their lives on the state’s roads in traffic crashes from 2014-2018. The report also finds that travel on Virginia’s roadways has increased by 14 percent from 2000 to 2018 and six percent from 2013 to 2018, resulting in increasing traffic congestion, causing significant delays and choking commuting and commerce. 

Virginia drivers lose $9.5 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in the state’s largest urban areas, along with a statewide total, is below.

The report also finds that Virginia’s current sources of transportation revenues will not keep pace with the state’s future transportation needs. This is largely a result of increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and the increasing use of electric vehicles, which, combined, are expected to reduce significantly the revenue generated by the state’s motor fuel tax revenues.  Average fuel efficiency for passenger vehicles in the U.S. has increased by 20 percent over the last decade and is expected to increase by 31 percent by 2030 and 51 percent by 2040.  And, electric vehicles, which now account for two percent of passenger vehicles in Virginia, are expected to increase to 46 percent of passenger vehicles in Virginia by 2040.  As a result of increased fuel efficiency and the adoption of electric vehicles, gasoline and diesel consumption in Virginia is expected to decrease 23 percent by 2030, and 51 percent by 2040.  This decline is expected to decrease Virginia’s state motor fuel tax receipts by 34 percent by 2030 and 62 percent by 2040. State diesel fuel tax receipts are expected to decrease 24 percent by 2030 and 50 percent by 2040.

“The lack of adequate, sustainable transportation funding in Virginia will lead to increasing deterioration on the state’s roads and bridges and even longer congestion-related delays for commuters, businesses and visitors,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Deteriorated, congested roads rob drivers of time and money while reducing the state’s competitive advantage and threatening economic growth. Making investments that will improve the condition and efficiency of Virginia’s transportation system will ensure that the state remains an attractive place to live, visit and do business.”

The TRIP report finds that 12 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads in Virginia are in poor condition and another 22 percent are in mediocre condition, costing the state’s drivers an additional $2.8 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear. Twenty-four percent of major roads in Virginia are in fair condition and the remaining 42 percent are in good condition.

A total of 646 Virginia bridges (20 feet or longer) are rated poor/structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. More than eight thousand (8,499) of the state’s bridges are rated in fair condition and the remaining 4,786 are in good condition. 

Traffic congestion throughout the state is worsening, causing up to 102 annual hours of delay for drivers in some areas and costing as much as $2,015 per driver. Statewide, lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion costs Virginia drivers a total of $4.6 billion annually. 

Traffic crashes in Virginia claimed the lives 3,875 people between 2014 and 2018. Virginia’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.96 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2018 was lower than the national average of 1.13.  The fatality rate on Virginia’s non-interstate rural roads in 2018 was approximately three times higher than on all other roads in the state (2.05 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.63).  Traffic crashes imposed a total of $6.4 billion in economic costs in Virginia in 2018 and traffic crashes in which a lack of adequate roadway safety features were likely a contributing factor imposed $2.1 billion in economic costs.  

The efficiency and condition of Virginia’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy.  Annually, $497 billion in goods are shipped to and from Virginia, relying heavily on the state’s network of roads and bridges. Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system. Approximately 112,000 full-time jobs in Virginia in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are dependent on the quality, safety and reliability of the state’s transportation infrastructure network.

VIRGINIA KEY TRANSPORTATION FACTS 

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

Driving on Virginia roads that are deteriorated, congested and that lack some desirable safety features costs Virginia drivers a total of $9.5 billion each year. TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on rough roads, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes. The chart below details the cost of deficient roads statewide and for the average driver in the state’s largest urban areas. 

VIRGINIA ROADS PROVIDE A ROUGH RIDE

Due to inadequate state and local funding, 34 percent of major roads and highways in Virginia are in poor or mediocre condition. Driving on rough roads costs the average Virginia driver $468 annually in additional vehicle operating costs – a total of $2.8 billion statewide.  The chart below details pavement conditions on major roads in the state’s largest urban areas and statewide.

VIRGINIA BRIDGE CONDITIONS

More than 600 of Virginia’s bridges (646) are rated in poor/structurally deficient condition. Bridges that are rated poor/structurally deficient have significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. More than eight thousand (8,499) of the state’s bridges are rated in fair condition and the remaining 4,786 are in good condition. Most bridges are designed to last 50 years before major overhaul or replacement, although many newer bridges are being designed to last 75 years or longer. In Virginia, 46 percent of the state’s bridges were built in 1969 or earlier. The chart below details bridge conditions statewide and in the state’s largest urban areas.

VIRGINIA ROADS ARE INCREASINGLY CONGESTED

Congested roads choke commuting and commerce and cost Virginia drivers $4.6 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. In the most congested urban areas, drivers lose up to $2,015 and spend as many as 102 hours per year sitting in traffic as a result of congestion. 

VIRGINIA TRAFFIC SAFETY AND FATALITIES

From 2014 to 2018, 3,875 people were killed in traffic crashes in Virginia. In 2018, Virginia had 0.96 traffic fatalities for every 100 million miles traveled, lower than the national average of 1.13.  The fatality rate on Virginia’s non-interstate rural roads in 2018 was approximately three times higher than on all other roads in the state (2.05 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.63).

Traffic crashes imposed a total of $6.4 billion in economic costs in Virginia in 2018 and traffic crashes in which a lack of adequate roadway safety features were likely a contributing factor imposed $2.1 billion in economic costs.  The chart below details the number of people killed in traffic crashes in the state’s largest urban areas between 2015 and 2018, and the cost of traffic crashes per driver. 

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING IN VIRGINIA

Virginia’s current sources of transportation revenues will not keep pace with the state’s future transportation needs. This is partially a result of increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and the increasing use of electric vehicles, which have reduced the revenue generated by the state’s motor fuel taxes.  The average fuel efficiency of U.S. passenger vehicles increased from 20 miles per gallon in 2010 to 24.5 miles per gallon in 2020. Average fuel efficiency is expected to increase 31 percent by 2030 (to 32 miles per gallon) and 51 percent by 2040 (to 37 miles per gallon).  Electric vehicles, which now account for two percent of passenger vehicles in Virginia, are expected to increase to 46 percent of passenger vehicles in Virginia by 2040.

   As a result of increased fuel efficiency and the adoption of electric vehicles, gasoline and diesel consumption in Virginia is expected to decrease 23 percent between 2020 to 2030, and 51 percent by 2040.  This decline is expected to decrease Virginia’s state motor fuel tax receipts by 34 percent by 2030 and 62 percent by 2040. State diesel fuel tax receipts are expected to decrease 24 percent by 2030 and 50 percent by 2040.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of Virginia’s economy is riding on its transportation system. Each year, $497 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Virginia. The value of freight shipped to and from sites in Virginia, in inflation-adjusted dollars, is expected to increase 128 percent by 2045 and 92 percent for goods shipped by trucks, placing an increased burden on the state’s already deteriorated and congested network of roads and bridges. 

The amount of freight transported in Virginia and the rest of the U.S. is expected to increase significantly as a result of further economic growth, changing business and retail models, increasing international trade, and rapidly changing consumer expectations that place an emphasis on faster deliveries, often of smaller packages or payloads.  

According to a report by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association, the design, construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Virginia support approximately 112,000 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $5.2 billion annually. Approximately 1.5 million full-time jobs in Virginia in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation network.

CONCLUSION

            As Virginia works to enhance its thriving, growing and dynamic state, it will be critical that it is able to provide a 21st century network of roads, highways, bridges and transit that can accommodate the mobility demands of a modern society.

            Virginia will need to modernize its surface transportation system by improving the physical condition of its transportation network and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient, safe and reliable mobility for residents, visitors and businesses. Making needed improvements to the state’s roads, highways, bridges and transit systems would provide a boost to the economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long-term economic growth as a result of enhanced mobility and access. 

Numerous projects to improve the condition and expand the capacity of Virginia’s roads, highways, bridges and transit systems will not be able to proceed without a substantial boost in local, state or federal transportation funding.  If Virginia is unable to complete needed transportation projects it will hamper the state’s ability to improve the condition and efficiency of its transportation system or enhance economic development opportunities and quality of life.  

For the full report visit tripnet.org

Founded in 1971, TRIP ® of Washington, DC, is a nonprofit organization that researches, evaluates and distributes economic and technical data on surface transportation issues.  TRIP is sponsored by insurance companies, equipment manufacturers, distributors and suppliers; businesses involved in highway and transit engineering and construction; labor unions; and organizations concerned with efficient and safe surface transportation.