Tag Archive for 'safety training'

5 Ways to Shake Up Your Safety Training

Safety is always an important topic because it’s always an important part of our lives, especially in construction where exposure to risk is a constant.

“Safety Training Ninja” will be presented on Thursday, March 12, 2020 from 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. at CONEXPO-CON/AGG.

Here’s a look at what you can expect, courtesy of the CONEXPO-CON/AGG:

5 Ways to Shake Up Your Safety Training

At 20-years old, Regina McMichael’s husband died after falling off a roof at a jobsite where he was working. That was the day her safety career started. Thirty-three years later she is still laser-focused on making the industry safer by improving the way we teach safety training. Her energy, humor, and engaging style as a speaker and trainer has earned her rave reviews throughout the industry. She recently shared five key ways to change your safety training to make it more effective.

  1. Identify What the Learners Know and What They Need to Know

“The gap between these two areas is what you teach to,” says McMichael. “Nothing more, nothing less.” She teaches trainers to use the ADDIE Model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) to first analyze and then design training.  “We need to respect our audience and not waste time teaching them things they don’t need to know, like the 29 CFR 19….– they don’t need to know that to be safe,” she says.

  1. Make Training Interactive

It’s time to put away those deadly PowerPoint presentations. McMichael recommends engaging workers with problem-solving activities. “Give them a scenario and ask how would you fix this? It will be much more interesting and fun,” she says. “Have the workers help develop the solutions and train themselves.” Use case studies, group discussion and competition to gain their interest and attention. “Friendly competition makes classes fun and makes things stick,” she says.

  1. Use Multiple Avenues to Train Workers

In construction there are a huge number of small firms without someone in a dedicated safety role. Those tasked with safety training are frequently overworked and can find themselves in a position of having to teach a topic they don’t have any expertise in. McMichael advises firms to use multiple training tools, such as local classes, online training, in-person training, and one-on-one jobsite training with supervisors to help lessen the burden on those in the safety-training role. “There is no one magic solution,” she explains.

  1. Bring Humanity Back to Safety

“If we’re going to be successful, safety training cannot be about compliance,” says McMichael. “We have to let human beings know we care about them and let them know we want them to stay alive.” Jobsite pressures can often result in workers not taking the time to be safe. Employers need to show they value workers by providing them with the knowledge and best practices to ensure they go home to their families.

  1. Support Your Trainers

McMichael believes a commitment to safety and effective training will enable companies to move from compliance-driven checklists to humanity-based solutions. One of McMichael’s classes, Getting a Seat at the C-Suite: What Every Safety Pro Should Know, focuses on how to get management to support safety initiatives. Another, titled Safety Training Ninjas, based on her recently released book, “The Safety Training Ninja” equips trainers with a process to develop effective training, and tools to make it valuable and something people want to learn. Trainers also learn how to develop learning objectives and demonstrate objectives were achieved. People not Policy, is about bringing humanity back to the safety world. All three programs will be offered at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2020.

For free safety training resources and information about McMichael visit www.safetytrainingninja.com or http://www.reginamcmichael.com.

CONEXPO-CON/AGG’s comprehensive Education Program is the leading source for contractors, business owners, construction material producers and end users to obtain cutting-edge information for today’s challenging economy and business model.

About CONEXPO-CON/AGG

Held every three years, CONEXPO-CON/AGG is the must-attend event for construction industry professionals. The next CONEXPO-CON/AGG will be held March 10-14, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. For more information on CONEXPO-CON/AGG, visit https://www.conexpoconagg.com.

AEM Recommends — Build a Strong Construction Safety Culture

Commit to Ongoing Training, Take Advantage of Technology

 Safety is improving in the construction industry, according to the National Safety Council, but serious injuries and fatalities still occur.

“I think it’s fair to say that while we have been getting better at preventing most incidents and improving safety, in general, there are specific ways in which we have not been improving and we need to do more to address,” explains John Dony of the Campbell Institute/National Safety Council.

Dony and fellow safety professionals outlined how to build a strong construction safety culture in a recent CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 article (learn more at http://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe/).

Beyond Compliance: Creating a Culture of Safety

Going beyond compliance training is one of the biggest things that organizations in any industry can do, but this is perhaps more relevant in construction than any other industry because compliance training is often mandated, according to Dony.

He suggests that training around more advanced safety topics and focusing on creating a culture of safety are what is really critical – not necessarily being able to score 80 percent on a comprehensive test.

Operator In Safety Helmet and red square shirt receiving instruction for Straight Boom Lift

Creating a culture of safety includes empowering all workers, employees, or contractors to make observations, report unsafe conditions, and have the authority to stop work without retribution.

“Until an organization is able to build that sort of a culture and back it with a management system built on the principle of continuous improvement, it won’t get very far with training,” he explains.

Consider this example: you can take first aid training a hundred times, but you will never be a doctor. You’ll just be very good at first aid.

In the same way, focusing on a basic level of safety training and not paying attention to systems and culture will not fundamentally make an organization any safer, Dony says.

Still, there are a number of resources and tools at the disposal of construction companies today. For instance, rainy-day and on-the-spot training are available and effective. However, in-person training provides invaluable tools, resources, and information to ensure participants can apply information learned in the field, suggests Eric Perry of the American Traffic Safety Services Assn. (ATSSA).

Emerging Technologies Enhance Safety Training

Technology, in general, is making training and development both more efficient and effective. Case in point: mobile learning, education and training conducted via hand-held devices.

“Training is no longer one and done, check-the-box events,” says David Braunstein of Together for Safer Roads.

“Organizations can now offer ongoing, engaging micro-learning events, reaching employees who do not normally work out of an office environment. This means safety training can literally accompany employees

Excavator operator using tablet computer at work site

to the jobsite, keeping safe practices and procedures top of mind,” he explains.

Braunstein suggests one of the most important skills any employee can develop in the construction industry is hazard recognition—and technology can help.

Advances in the field of training and development include virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), which are already helping many construction professionals analyze, predict, and prevent hazardous situations.

Other emerging technologies that can help with safety training include:

  • Wearables for monitoring heat stress or limiting access to restricted areas
  • Sensors for avoiding human and machine interaction
  • Drones for inspections
  • Mobile devices for safety reporting and information

Dony says the applications for technology that help make workers safer are nearly limitless, and more are being explored by organizations every day.

“The key is to consider what technology will have the biggest bang for the buck and also ensure that you don’t add any additional or new risks to a project when you integrate technology as a solution for an existing problem,” he says.

“For many employees, acceptance of new technologies can be challenging, so it is important for companies to invest in meaningful training to understand the purpose and successful use of these technologies,” says Braunstein.

Learn more about industry trends and technologies through the CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 initiative (https://www.conexpoconagg.com/subscribe/) of the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM).