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TRIP Report: Maine’s Top 50 Transportation Challenges and Improvements Needed to Address Them

TRIPNew Report Identifies Maine’s Top 50 Transportation Challenges And Needed Fixes, Including Deteriorated And Congested Roadways, Deficient Bridges And Needed Safety Improvements

Deficient roads, highways and bridges in Maine are posing mounting challenges to the state’s residents, visitors and businesses and addressing these challenges will require numerous projects to reconstruct highways, repair and replace bridges improve safety features and improve access on the state’s transportation system.  This is according to a new report released recently by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research organization.

The report, Maine’s Top 50 Transportation Challenges and the Improvements Needed to Address Them,” identifies and ranks the state’s top 50 transportation challenges. Those transportation challenges include 12 sections of major roads or highways that need significant repairs or reconstruction; 19 major bridges in the state that have significant deficiencies and need to be rebuilt or reconstructed; an expansion of a marine terminal; and 18 sections of the state’s transportation system that need improvements to address multiple challenges by improving safety, increasing access or improving road or bridge conditions.  The report also offers solutions for fixing each of the transportation challenges.

thThe top transportation challenges in the state, as identified by the TRIP report, are as follows. Additional details for all 50 transportation challenges can be found in the report’s Appendix.

Executive Summary

            Maine’s extensive system of roads, highways and bridges provides the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. As the backbone of the Pine Tree State’s economy, Maine’s surface transportation system plays a vital role in the state’s economic well-being, and is an integral part of what makes Maine an attractive place to live, work, visit and do business.

However, increasing roadway and bridge deterioration, traffic safety concerns, and growing congestion threaten to stifle economic growth and negatively impact the quality of life of the state’s 1.3 million residents. Due to insufficient transportation funding at the federal, state and local level, Maine faces numerous challenges in providing a road, highway and bridge network that is smooth, well-maintained, as safe as possible, and that affords a level of mobility capable of supporting the state’s economic goals

As Maine looks to build and maintain a thriving and diverse economy, it will need to modernize its transportation system by improving the physical condition of its roads, highways and bridges, and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient, safe and reliable mobility to the state’s residents, visitors and businesses.  Making needed improvements to Maine’s roads, highways and bridges will provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by stimulating short and long-term economic growth.

Numerous segments of Maine’s transportation system have significant deterioration, are congested or crowded, lack some desirable safety features, and do not have adequate capacity to provide reliable mobility, creating challenges for Maine’s residents, visitors, businesses and state and local governments.  This report looks at the condition and use of Maine’s system of roads, highways and bridges and provides information on the state’s top 50 transportation challenges and the improvements needed to address these challenges.

Deficient roads, highways and bridges, and crowded or congested routes in Maine are posing mounting challenges to the state’s residents, visitors and businesses in the form of lost time, increased vehicle operating costs and the financial burden of making needed transportation improvements. 

  • Maine’s top 50 transportation challenges as ranked by TRIP include: Twelve sections of major roads or highways that need significant repairs or reconstruction, 19 major bridges in the state that have significant deficiencies and need to be rebuilt or reconstructed; one improvement to a maritime facility, and 18 sections of the state’s transportation system that need improvements to address multiple challenges by improving safety, increasing access or improving road or bridge conditions.
  • TRIP ranked Maine’s top transportation challenges by giving each segment or facility an overall score, based on a scale that included points for the following categories: current volume of daily travel or ridership; the challenge posed to the public based on the significance of the problem or deficiency; the importance of the route or facility to regional, interstate or international travel patterns; the importance of the route or facility to the regional economy; and, the cost to repair the deficiency.
  • The following list details the top 10 transportation challenges in Maine. Further details about each challenge, as well as the full list of 50 challenges, can be found in the Appendix.

1.    Needed Reconstruction of a portion of Route 3 in Bar Harbor. Addressing this challenge will require reconstructing 4.8 miles of Route 3 in Bar Harbor from approximately one half-mile west of Sand Point Road to Route 233. Estimated cost is $14 million. Route 3, the Acadia All-American Road, is perhaps the most significant highway in Maine for the tourism industry, providing access to Acadia National Park and over 1,000 beds for lodging. It carries approximately 10,317 vehicles per day. The current design and construction of the road lead to constant cracking at the margins. Safety will be greatly improved with better road geometrics, improved access and improved facilities for pedestrian and bicycle. This completes Route 3 improvement projects from the head of the island near Trenton to Bar Harbor.

2.    Needed Replacement of Union Street Bridge in Bangor. Addressing this challenge will require replacing the Union Street Bridge over I-95 in Bangor. Estimated cost is $8.7 million. This is a critical bridge over I-95 on Union Street (Route 222), providing access to Bangor International Airport and the University of Maine at Bangor.

3.    Needed Reconstruction of a portion of Route 302 in Portland area. Addressing this challenge will require reconstructing Route 302 from Stack Em Inn Road and extending west 5.19 miles. Estimated cost is $7.4 million. Route 302 is the major highway from Portland to Fryeburg, Maine and Conway, New Hampshire. It is a major route for commerce, supplying raw products and finished goods to market, as well as a significant commuter route for the labor force in the Greater Portland labor market. This route also serves the tourist rich areas of Fryeburg, Maine and Conway, New Hampshire. There are no practicable alternative routes without adding substantial time and cost.

4.    Needed Replacement of Pine Point Crossing Bridge in Scarborough. Addressing this challenge will require replacing the Pine Point Crossing Bridge over the Pan Am Railroad. Estimated cost is $3.3 million. This bridge, located on Pine Point Road (Route 9), provides primary access to the Coastal Beaches surrounding the Cumberland-York County boundary. The bridge carries an important highway supporting tourism economy. Loss of the bridge will have negative economic impact especially to businesses along this section of Route 9. There are no practicable alternative routes without adding substantial time and cost.

5.    Needed Replacement of Bar Mills Bridge from Buxton to Hollis. Addressing this challenge will require replacing the deteriorated Bar Mills Bridge over the Saco River at the Buxton – Hollis town line. Estimated cost is $8.3 million. The replacement of this bridge will improve safety and access and provide a more direct connection from Buxton to Hollis.

6.    Needed Capacity Expansion of the International Marine Terminal (IMT).  Addressing this challenge will require property acquisition to increase the capacity of the terminal, providing direct rail access to the terminal, and other infrastructure improvements. Estimated cost is $9 million. The International Marine Terminal (IMT) in Portland was selected by the Icelandic Steamship Company, Eimskip, to serve as their North American logistical hub, and only port of call in the US.  They have been carrying freight to and from Portland since March 2013.  Maine businesses will benefit from competitive access to important markets in Eastern Canada, Scandinavia and Northern Europe.

7.    Needed Replacement of Durham Bridge between Durham and Lisbon. Addressing this challenge will require replacing the Durham Bridge (Route 9) over the Androscoggin River. Estimated cost is $6.8 million. This is an essential bridge over the Androscoggin River. Route 9 provides a major commuter route through high-population regions, from southern and western Kennebec through the rural areas of Cumberland County west of I-295. Route 9 is important as a commuter route for work force from rural areas to the service centers communities along its length from Gardiner to Portland. There are no practicable alternative routes without adding substantial time and cost.

8.    Needed Reconstruction of a portion of River Road in Westbrook and Windham. Addressing this challenge will require reconstructing three miles of River Road from Westbrook town line to 0.17 miles south of the intersection of Chute and Depot Road. Estimated cost is $4.8 million. River Road, an important commuter route, holds significant regional importance as a “bypass” alternative to congestion on Route 302 between Portland and Windham. It is an important route for goods and services that support regional businesses. Alternative routes are available, but with increased travel times and cost.

9.    Needed Reconstruction of a portion of Route 2 in Old Town and Milford. Addressing this challenge will require reconstructing 0.75 miles of Route 2 from Bradley Road to 0.29 miles north of Ferry Road. Estimated cost is $3.5 million. Route 2 provides a major non-interstate link from Houlton to Bangor and is a critical link from the forests of the region to the lumber and paper mills of the area, including those in Old Town, Bucksport and Lincoln.

10. Needed Construction of the Approach to the International Bridge at Fort Kent. Addressing this challenge will require constructing the approach associated with replacing the International Bridge on Route 1 in Aroostook. Estimated cost is $5.2 million. Route One connects the border crossings at Ft Kent, Madawaska, and Van Buren. This corridor, which carries approximately 8,100 vehicles per day, is the principal highway link to Route 11, Route 161, and to I-95 in Smyrna and Houlton. It is the transportation backbone of the natural resource based economy, serving as the gateway to the vast undeveloped forest of the “Maine Woods” and supplying raw products to paper and lumber mills throughout northern Maine. Route One also serves as a critical corridor for the logging, agricultural, winter sport and tourism industries. It also provides improved access to Canadian seaports.

Growth in population and vehicle travel has far outstripped the current capacity of Maine’s transportation system. The state’s population and economy will continue to grow in the future, bringing mounting challenges for the existing network of roads and bridges.

  • From 1990 to 2012, Maine’s population increased by eight percent, from approximately 1.2 million to approximately 1.3 million.
  • From 1990 to 2011, annual vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) in the state increased by 20 percent, from approximately 11.9 billion VMT to 14.2 billion VMT. Based on travel and population trends, TRIP estimates that vehicle travel in Maine will increase another 15 percent by 2030.
  • Every year, $30.9 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Maine and another $41.1 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Maine, mostly by trucks. Eighty-one percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Maine are carried by trucks and another 13 percent are carried by parcel, U.S. Postal Service or courier services, which use trucks for part of their deliveries.

Maine’s extensive transportation system has some road and bridge deficiencies, lacks some desirable safety features and experiences severe congestion in key areas, resulting in significant costs to the state’s motorists.  Improvements to the condition and efficiency of the state’s transportation system will enhance quality of life, roadway safety and economic development.

  • Maine’s population and economy will continue to grow in the future, bringing mounting challenges for the existing network of roads and bridges. The state will need to expand key roads, highways and bridges to increase mobility and ease traffic congestion, make needed road and bridge repairs, and improve roadway safety.
  • Maine’s system of 22,874 miles of roads and 2,408 bridges carries 14.2 billion vehicle miles of travel annually.
  • In 2011, nine percent of Maine’s major roads were in poor condition and an additional 24 percent were in mediocre condition.
  •             The pavement data in this report is provided by the Federal Highway Administration, based on data submitted annually by the Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways in the state.
  • Fifteen percent of Maine’s bridges are rated structurally deficient.  A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.  Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks, school buses and emergency services vehicles.
  • Eighteen percent of Maine’s bridges are rated as functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards or are inadequate to accommodate current traffic levels, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • Maine’s urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, hampering commuting and commerce while reducing economic opportunities and quality of life in the state. Unless Maine’s transportation system is improved and enhanced, congestion will worsen dramatically in the coming years.
  • Roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of traffic fatalities. There were 136 traffic fatalities in 2011 in Maine. A total of 794 people died on Maine’s highways from 2007 through 2011.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design.
  • Maine’s traffic fatality rate of 0.95 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2011 was lower than the national average of 1.10.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion.  Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and, better road markings and traffic signals.

Transportation projects that improve the efficiency, condition or safety of a highway provide significant economic benefits by reducing transportation delays and costs associated with a deficient transportation system.  Some benefits of transportation improvements include the following.

  • Improved business competitiveness due to reduced production and distribution costs as a result of increased travel speeds and fewer mobility barriers.
  • Improvements in household welfare resulting from better access to higher-paying jobs, a wider selection of competitively priced consumer goods, additional housing and healthcare options, and improved mobility for residents without access to private vehicles.
  • Gains in local, regional and state economies due to improved regional economic competitiveness, which stimulates population and job growth.
  • Increased leisure/tourism and business travel resulting from the enhanced condition and reliability of a region’s transportation system.
  • A reduction in economic losses from vehicle crashes, traffic congestion and vehicle maintenance costs associated with driving on deficient roads.
  • The creation of both short-term and long-term jobs.
  • Transportation projects that expand roadway or bridge capacity produce significant economic benefits by reducing congestion and improving access, thus speeding the flow of people and goods while reducing fuel consumption.
  • Transportation projects that maintain and preserve existing transportation infrastructure also provide significant economic benefits by improving travel speeds, capacity, load-carry abilities and safety, and reducing operating costs for people and businesses.  Such projects also extend the service life of a road, bridge or transit vehicle or facility, which saves money by either postponing or eliminating the need for more expensive future repairs.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number one site selection factor in a 2011 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Sources of data for this report include the Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Maine Transportation Institute (TTI), and the U.S. Census Bureau.  All data used in the report is the latest available.

 

New TRIP Report Identifies The 40 Transportation Projects Most Needed To Support Arkansas’ Economic Growth

New TRIP Report Identifies The 40 Transportation Projects Most Needed To Support Arkansas’ Economic Growth; Projects Would Improve, Modernize And Expand Roads, Highways And Brdiges

In order to adequately enhance the state’s economic growth and quality of life, Arkansas will need to make numerous improvements to its transportation system.  This is according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research organization.

TRIP’s report, “The Top 40 Transportation Projects to Support Economic Growth and Quality of Life in Arkansas,” identifies the projects most needed to provide Arkansas with a transportation system that can support the increased movement of people, goods and resources throughout the state.  The most needed transportation improvements in Arkansas include projects to build, expand or modernize the state’s highways, roads and bridges. These improvements would enhance economic development opportunities and quality of life throughout the state by increasing mobility and freight movement, easing congestion, and improving traffic safety, thus making Arkansas an attractive place to live, visit and do business.

The TRIP report lists the needed projects geographically (including breakdowns for Central Arkansas, Northwest Arkansas, Northeast Arkansas, Southwest Arkansas, Southeast Arkansas and Statewide), ordered by route number.  The most needed projects in Central Arkansas include the following: adding four lanes to 4.2 miles of I-30 in Pulaski County; rehabilitation and reconstruction of 2.6 miles of I-30 in Little Rock; adding two lanes to 4.6 miles of I-30 in Saline County; adding two lanes to 13 miles of I-40 in Faulkner County; adding two lanes to 5.6 miles of I-40 in Pulaski County; providing interchange modifications on I-430 at I-30, Highway 10 and I-40 in Pulaski County; adding two lanes and a center turning lane to 15.8 miles of Highway 64 in White and Faulkner Counties; adding two lanes to Highway 67 from Jacksonville to Cabot; adding two lanes to 17.6 miles of Highway 70 in Garland and Saline Counties; adding two lanes and a center turning lane to three miles of Highway 270 near Hot Springs; rehabilitation and reconstruction of 6.6 miles of I-440 in Pulaski County; rehabilitating and reconstructing 37 miles of I-530 in Pulaski, Saline and Jefferson Counties; adding two lanes to 2.3 miles of I-630 in Little Rock; and pavement restoration on 3.2 miles of I-630 in Little Rock.  Additional details on these and the other projects that make up the 40 projects most needed for Arkansas’ economic recovery and growth are included in the report.

“Arkansas has many more road and bridge needs than it has dollars to put towards maintenance repair or replacement,” said Mark Lamberth, co-chairman of Move Arkansas Forward.  “A healthy transportation system is vital to the growth of the state’s economic vitality, but the state needs adequate funding to ensure that we move in the right direction.”

Enhancing critical segments of Arkansas’s transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields.  In the long term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth, improving the quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors.

TRIP compiled the list of transportation projects based on a system that considered the following: short-term economic benefits, including job creation; the level of improvement in the condition of the transportation facility, including safety improvements; the degree of improvement in access and mobility; and, the long-term improvement provided in regional or state economic performance and competitiveness.

Sustaining Arkansas’s long-term economic growth and maintaining the state’s high quality of life will require increased investment in expanding the capacity of the state’s transportation system, which will enhance business productivity and support short- and long-term job creation in the state.

“Investing in these transportation projects will be key to long term economic growth and quality of life in Arkansas,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP. “Private sector jobs will be created in the short term, resulting in transportation, improvements from which the state’s residents, businesses and tourists will benefit for decades.”

Executive Summary

Arkansas’ transportation system has played a significant role in the state’s development, providing mobility and access for residents, visitors, businesses and industry.  The state’s roads, highways, rails and public transit systems remain the backbone of the Natural State’s economy.  Arkansas’ transportation system also provides for a high quality of life and makes the state a desirable place to live and visit.  The condition and quality of its transportation system will play a critical role in Arkansas’ ability to capitalize on its economic advantages and meet the demands of the 21st Century.

To achieve sustainable economic growth, Arkansas must proceed with numerous projects to improve key roads, bridges and highways.  Enhancing critical segments of Arkansas’ transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long-term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness and improve the quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth.

In this report, TRIP examines recent transportation and economic trends in Arkansas and provides information on the transportation projects in the state that are most needed to support economic growth.  Sources of data include the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau.  All data used in the report is the latest available.

TRIP has identified the 40 transportation projects that are most needed to support Arkansas’ economic growth. These projects are located throughout the state.

  • The most needed transportation improvements in Arkansas include projects to build, expand or modernize roads, highways and bridges throughout the state.  These improvements would enhance economic development opportunities throughout the state by increasing mobility and freight movement, easing congestion, and making Arkansas an attractive place to live, visit and do business.
  • TRIP evaluated each transportation project based on the following criteria: short-term economic benefits, including job creation; the level of improvement in the condition of the transportation facility, including safety improvements; the degree of improvement in access and mobility; and the long-term improvement provided in regional or state economic performance and competitiveness.
  • Arkansas’ 40 most needed transportation projects to support economic development in the state as determined by TRIP follow.  The projects are listed geographically and ordered by route number.

STATEWIDE

    I-40 Rehabilitation and Reconstruction. This $465 million project would rehabilitate and reconstruct 228 miles of I-40, including replacing the I-40 bridge over the White River. In recent years, truck traffic has increased significantly and has accelerated the deterioration rate on Arkansas’ Interstate system. The I-40 project will improve the conditions of the Interstate, decrease maintenance costs and provide a smoother ride for users.

CENTRAL ARKANSAS

  •     Adding Four Lanes to I-30 in Pulaski County. This $300 million project would add two lanes in each direction to a 4.2 mile portion of I-30, from the junction of I-440 and I-530 to the junction of I-40, including the I-30 River Bridge. This segment is frequently congested, creating a bottleneck for travelers. Widening the roadway will improve traffic flow and conditions for both local and through traffic, alleviating travel delay.
  •     I-30 Rehabilitation and Reconstruction in Little Rock. This $20 million project includes the rehabilitation and reconstruction of a 2.6 mile section of I-30 between Geyer Springs Road and 65th Street. In recent years, increased truck traffic has caused an increase in the deterioration rate of this section of Interstate. This project will improve the condition of the roadway, decrease long-term maintenance costs and improve the rideability for users.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to I-30 in Saline County. This $75 million project would add two lanes to 4.6 miles of Interstate 30 from Highway 70 to Sevier Street in Benton. This section of roadway consistently creates a bottleneck for residents traveling to Little Rock from the south.  The project is a continuation of capacity improvements through the corridor and will improve travel conditions for both local and through traffic.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Interstate 40 in Faulkner County. This $32 million project would add two lanes to 13 miles of I-40 from Conway to the Pulaski County Line. This will alleviate the bottleneck of commuters who live north of Little Rock but work in the greater metro area. The project is a continuation of capacity improvements through the corridor and will improve travel conditions for both local and through traffic.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to I-40 in Pulaski County. This $43 million project would add two lanes to 5.6 miles of I-40 from the Faulkner County Line to I-430. This project is a continuation of capacity improvements through the corridor and will improve travel conditions for both local and through traffic. I-40 consistently creates a bottleneck for motorists traveling to the greater Little Rock area from north of the city.
  •     Provide Interchange Modifications on Interstate 430 at Interstate 30, Highway 10, and Interstate 40 in Pulaski County. This $28 million project will improve operations at three major interchanges on Interstate 430. This project is a continuation of operational improvements through the corridor and will improve travel conditions for both local and through traffic. These three interchanges consistently create bottlenecks for motorists.
  •     Adding Two Lanes and a Center Turning Lane to Highway 64 in White and Faulkner Counties. This $59 million project would add two lanes and a center turning lane to 15.8 miles of Highway 64 from the Vilonia Bypass to Highway 67. This project will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and increase the capacity between Conway and Beebe and points beyond. The Highway 64 corridor in East Arkansas is important to the state’s economy due to the large amount of agricultural products that are transported. In recent years, this route has also been a very important link when I-40 was closed due to flooding.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 67 from Jacksonville to Cabot. This $152 million project would add two lanes to 12 miles of Highway 67 from Jacksonville to Cabot. Highway 67 is consistently a bottleneck for residents who live north of the urban area but work in the greater Little Rock area. This project is a continuation of capacity improvements throughout the corridor and will improve travel conditions for both local and through traffic.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 70 in Garland and Saline Counties. This $60 million project would add two lanes to 17.6 miles of Highway 70, from Hot Springs to Interstate 30. This project is needed to help complete the state’s four-lane grid system, increase capacity between Hot Springs and I-30 and increase safety.
  •     Adding Two Lanes and a Center Turning Lane to Highway 270 near Hot Springs. This $13 million project would add two lanes and a center turning lane to three miles of Highway 270 near Hot Springs. This project will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and will improve travel conditions through the area, increase the capacity between the Hot Springs and Mt. Ida, improve safety and address the increase in seasonal tourist traffic.
  •     I-440 Rehabilitation and Reconstruction in Pulaski County. This $60 million project would rehabilitate or reconstruct 6.6 miles of Interstate 440 between I-30 and I-40. In recent years, increased truck traffic has caused an increase in deterioration on this section of Arkansas’ Interstate system. The I-440 project will improve the condition of the Interstate, decrease long-term maintenance costs and improve the rideability for users.
  •     I-530 Rehabilitation and Reconstruction in Pulaski, Saline and Jefferson Counties.  This $132 million project would rehabilitate and reconstruct 37 miles of deteriorated sections of I-530, from I-30 in Little Rock to Highway 65 in Pine Bluff. Recent increases in truck traffic have resulted in significant deterioration to this section of the state’s Interstate system. This project will improve the condition of the Interstate, decrease maintenance costs and provide a smoother ride for users.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to I-630 in Little Rock. This $50 million project would add two lanes to 2.3 miles of I-630 from Baptist Hospital to University Avenue in Little Rock, a section of roadway that is consistently congested. This project is a continuation of capacity improvements on the I-430/I-630 Interchange and will improve travel conditions for both local and through traffic.
  •     Pavement Restoration on I-630 in Little Rock. This $32 million project would restore pavement on 3.2 miles of I-630 from I-30 in Little Rock to Cedar St./Pine St. Increased truck traffic has caused deterioration on this section of Interstate. This rehabilitation will decrease long-term maintenance costs and improve the rideability for users.

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS

  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 65 in Boone and Newton Counties. This $45 million project would increase capacity on seven miles of Highway 65 from Highway 412 to Western Grove. It will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and increase capacity between Clinton and Harrison and points beyond. The Highway 65 Corridor is a very important shipping route for products that are headed to central Missouri. These improvements will also improve safety through the mountainous region of the state.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 65 in Van Buren County. This $60 million project would increase capacity on 12.5 miles on Highway 65 between Dennard and Clinton. The Highway 65 project would help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and increase the capacity between Clinton and Harrison and points beyond.  The Highway 65 Corridor is a very important shipping route for products that are headed to central Missouri. The expansion of the corridor will also improve safety through the mountainous region of the state.
  •     Construct Phase I of the Bella Vista Bypass. This $100 million project would complete Phase I of the 12 mile Bella Vista Bypass (Highway 71).  Phase I will construct two of the ultimate 4-lane Interstate facility from I-540 in Bentonville to the Missouri State Line. This project is part of the future Interstate 49 Corridor that will eventually connect New Orleans to Kansas City and improve travel conditions throughout the area by separating the local commuters from through traffic.
  •     Construct Phase I of the Springdale Bypass. This $150 million project involves the construction of a four-lane divided highway (Highway 412) from I-540 in Springdale to the planned Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport Access Road. This roadway is needed to help complete the state’s four-lane grid system. The Highway 412 corridor is the main east-west route in the northern portion of the state. This project will relieve congestion in the growing Springdale area.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to I-540 in Washington and Benton Counties. This $125 million project would add two lanes to 15 miles of I-540 from Fayetteville to Bentonville. I-540 regularly experiences severe congestion due to the high volume of traffic traveling between Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers and Bentonville. This corridor is a vital link in the northwest part of the state. Increased capacity will make the roadway safer and more efficient.
  •     I-540 Rehabilitation and Reconstruction. This $260 million project will rehabilitate and reconstruct 23 miles of roadway and eight interchanges on I-540 in Sebastian, Crawford, Washington and Benton Counties. Due to significant increases in truck traffic, this portion of the state’s Interstate system has deteriorated rapidly and is in need of repair. This project will improve the condition of the Interstate, decrease maintenance costs and provide a smoother ride for users. The modifications to interchanges will accommodate the widening of I-540 in the future.

NORTHEAST ARKANSAS

  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 18 in Craighead and Mississippi Counties.  This $60 million project would increase capacity on six miles of Highway 18 from Lake City to Highway 181. The project would help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and increase capacity between Jonesboro and Blytheville while providing a critical link between I-55 and the rest of Northeast Arkansas. These improvements will increase regional mobility and the freight movement through the area.
  •     I-55 Rehabilitation and Reconstruction in Crittenden and Mississippi Counties. This $150 million project would rehabilitate or reconstruct approximately 60 miles of I-55, from I-40 to Highway 61 near Blytheville, and from Highway 18 in Blytheville to the Missouri State Line. This section of I-55 has experienced deterioration due to increased truck traffic. This project will improve the condition of the Interstate, decrease long-term maintenance costs and improve the rideability for users.
  •    Adding Two Lanes to Highway 64 in Crittenden County. This $50 million project would add two lanes to 14 miles of Highway 64, from the Cross County Line to Highway 147. The Highway 64 project is needed to help complete the state’s four lane grid system and to increase capacity between Marion and Wynne and points beyond. Increased capacity on this vital economic corridor will help farmers get their produce to markets in the Memphis area. This route is adjacent to the access point for a critical intermodal facility.
  •     Construction of Highway 67 to Interstate Standards. This $27 million project will complete the upgrade of Highway 67 to Interstate standards between Little Rock and Walnut Ridge. It is a continuation of corridor improvements that will provide a more direct connection from Little Rock to St. Louis.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 167 in Independence County. This $36 million project would add two lanes to 9.7 miles of Highway 167 from Highway 394 to Cave City. The Highway 167 project is needed to help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and increase capacity between Batesville and Cave City. Highway 167 is the main north-south route through the central part of the state and is a vital freight route that connects rural areas to the urban center of the state.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 226 in Craighead County.  This $41 million project will complete the widening of Highway 226 from the new location of Highway 67 to Highway 49. This 3.4 mile project would help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and provide a critical link between Little Rock and Jonesboro.  These improvements will increase regional mobility and the freight movement through the area.
  •  Adding Two Lanes to Highway 412 in Lawrence and Greene Counties. This $70 million project would add two lanes to 14.7 miles of Highway 412 from Highway 67 to Highway 141. This project will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system, increase capacity between the Paragould and Walnut Ridge, and increase freight movement through the northeastern part of the state. The Highway 412 corridor is the main east-west corridor in the northern part of the state.
  •     Construct Two Lanes of the Paragould Bypass in Greene County. This $29 million project would construct two lanes of an ultimate four-lane principle arterial on new location for a distance of 10.4 miles. The project will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and will decrease congestion in Paragould. The Highway 412 corridor is the main east-west corridor in the northern part of the state. This project will increase freight movement through the northeastern part of the state.

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

  •     Rehabilitation and Reconstruction on I-30. This $164 million project would rehabilitate and reconstruct 93 miles of I-30 from the Texas state line to the Social Hill Rest Area. Increased truck traffic in recent years has accelerated the deterioration of this portion of the state’s Interstate system. The I-30 project will improve the condition of the interstate, decrease maintenance costs and provide a smoother ride for users.
  •     Constructing Highway 71 to Interstate Standards. This $16 million project will complete 4.5 miles of Highway 71 to Interstate standards from Doddridge to the Louisiana state line. This will finish Arkansas’ portion of the future Interstate 49 corridor from Texarkana to Shreveport and improve freight movements and regional travel between the two areas.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 82 in Columbia and Union Counties.  This $127 million project would add two lanes to 22.5 miles of Highway 82 from west of Magnolia to El Dorado. The Highway 82 corridor is the main east-west connector in south Arkansas. It will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system, increase the capacity between Magnolia and El Dorado and allow access to I-69 once it is constructed.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 167 in Calhoun County. This $120 million project would add two lanes to 18 miles of Highway 167 from Hampton to Highway 79. The Highway 167 Corridor is the main north-south route through the central part of the state and is a vital freight route connecting rural areas to the urban center of the state. This project will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and will increase capacity between the Fordyce and El Dorado and points beyond.
  •     Adding Two Lanes and Widening the Ouachita River Bridge on Highway 167 in Union and Calhoun Counties. This $106 million project would add two lanes to 25.1 miles of Highway 167 from El Dorado to Hampton. The Highway 167 project is needed to help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and increase capacity between Fordyce and El Dorado and points beyond. The Highway 167 corridor is the main north-south route through the central part of the state and is a vital freight route that connects rural areas to the urban center of the state.

SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS

  •     Add Two Lanes to Highway 1 in Lee County. This $18 million project would add two lanes to 5.4 miles of Highway 1 from Cypress Corner to County Road 216. The Highway 1 project is a continuation of corridor improvements in the area along Highway 1 and Highway 49. It will help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and will increase capacity between Forrest City and Helena-West Helena.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 1 in Lee and Phillips County.  This $36 million project would add two lanes to seven miles of Highway 1, from Walnut Corner to Cypress Corner. The Highway 1 project is needed to help complete the state’s four-lane grid system and will increase capacity between Forrest City and Helena-West Helena and points beyond.
  •     Construction of the initial Arkansas portion of I-69 in Drew County. This $51 million project will construct 20 miles of the first section of I-69 in Arkansas, which will connect Houston to Detroit. Interstate 69 will be a vital route for most freight movements through the central United States. Rural economies in the southern portion of the state will benefit greatly from increased access.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 82 in Ashley County. This $27 million project would add two lanes to 6.1 miles of Highway 82 from County Road 411 to Highway 425. The Highway 82 project is needed to help complete the state’s four-land grid system and to increase capacity between Crossett and Highway 425. The Highway 82 corridor is the main east-west connector in south Arkansas. This section will connect the cities of El Dorado and Lake Village to Interstate 69 when it is built.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 167 in Cleveland and Dallas Counties. This $34.3 million project would add two lanes to the segment from Highway 273 to Peters Road. The Highway 167 project is needed to help complete the state’s four-land grid system. It will also increase capacity between Fordyce and Little Rock. The Highway 167 Corridor is the main north-south route through the central part of the state and is a vital freight route connecting rural areas to the urban center of the state.
  •     Adding Two Lanes to Highway 82/425 in Ashley County. This $70 million project would add two lanes to 15 miles of Highway 82/425 from the Louisiana State Line to Hamburg. This project will help complete the state’s four lane grid system and will increase capacity between the Louisiana State Line and Crossett. This is a continuation of corridor improvements and will connect I-20 to I-69 to accommodate the anticipated increase in freight movements through this area.

Transportation projects that improve the efficiency, condition or safety of a roadway provide significant economic benefits by reducing transportation delays and costs associated with a deficient transportation system.  Some benefits of transportation improvements include the following. 

  • Improved business competitiveness due to reduced production and distribution costs as a result of increased travel speeds and fewer mobility barriers.
  • Improvements in household welfare resulting from better access to higher-paying jobs, a wider selection of competitively priced consumer goods, additional housing and healthcare options, and improved mobility for residents without access to private vehicles.
  • Gains in local, regional and state economies due to improved regional economic competitiveness, which stimulates population and job growth.
  • Increased leisure/tourism and business travel resulting from the enhanced condition and reliability of a region’s transportation system.
  • A reduction in economic losses from vehicle crashes, traffic congestion and vehicle maintenance costs associated with driving on deficient roads.
  • Transportation projects that expand roadway capacity produce significant economic benefits by reducing congestion and improving access, thus speeding the flow of people and goods while reducing fuel consumption.
  • Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes.
  • A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,400 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

While Arkansas’ diverse economy has been impacted by the recession, the state’s transportation system will need to accommodate projected future growth.

  • From 1990 to 2010, Arkansas’ population increased by 24 percent, from approximately 2.4 million to approximately 2.9 million. Arkansas’ population is expected to increase to 3.1 million by 2025.
  • From 1990 to 2010, annual vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) in the state increased by 59 percent, from approximately 21 billion VMT to 33.5 billion VMT. Based on travel and population trends, TRIP estimates that vehicle travel in Arkansas will increase another 40 percent by 2030, reaching approximately 47 billion VMT.
  • Arkansas’ unemployment rate rose from 5.6 percent in September 2008 to 7.1 percent in September 2012. The national unemployment rate was 7.8 percent in September 2012.
  • In 2012, Arkansas is projected to have a 3.3 percent rate of economic growth, measured in real gross state produce (GSP), which is factored for price changes.  This rate of growth is higher than the forecast 1.2 percent increase in national real GSP in 2012.
  • Arkansas has benefited from a diverse economy, which includes significant employment in the following sectors: agriculture, food processing, tourism, mining, government and finance.

Arkansas’ economy is served by an extensive surface transportation system that has some deficiencies and experiences severe congestion in key areas.  Roads carry the majority of freight shipped in the state.

  • Arkansas’ system of 100,083 miles of roads and 12,641 bridges, maintained by local, state and federal governments, carry 33.5 billion vehicle miles of travel annually.
  • Thirty-nine percent of Arkansas’ major urban roads are deficient, with 14 percent rated in poor condition and an additional 25 percent rated mediocre in 2010.  An additional 26 percent of the state’s major roads were rated in fair condition and 35 percent were rated in good condition.
  • Seven percent of Arkansas’ bridges were rated structurally deficient in 2011.  A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components.  Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks, school buses and emergency services vehicles.
  • Every year, approximately $101.9 billion in goods are shipped annually from sites in Arkansas and another $112.1 billion in goods are shipped annually to sites in Arkansas, mostly by truck.
  • In 2011, 15 percent of Arkansas’ bridges were rated as functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • Eighty-three percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Arkansas are carried by trucks and another nine percent are carried by parcel, U.S. Postal Service, courier services or by multiple modes, which use trucks for part of the deliveries.

 Sources of data for this report include the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau.  All data used in the report is the latest available.

TRIP’s Top 40 Transportation Projects to Support Economic Growth and Quality of Life in Maryland

 

Executive Summary

Maryland’s transportation system has played a significant role in the state’s development, providing mobility and access for residents, visitors, businesses and industry. The state’s roads, highways, rails, ports and public transit systems remain the backbone of the Old Line State’s economy. Maryland’s transportation system also provides for a high quality of life and makes the state a desirable place to live and visit. The condition and quality of its transportation system will play a critical role in Maryland’s ability to continue to recover from the recession, capitalize on its economic advantages and meet the demands of the 21st Century.

To achieve sustainable economic growth, Maryland must proceed with numerous projects to improve key roads, bridges, highways and public transit systems. Enhancing critical segments of Maryland’s transportation system will boost the state’s economy in the short-term by creating jobs in construction and related fields. In the long-term these improvements will enhance economic competitiveness and improve the quality of life for the state’s residents and visitors by reducing travel delays and transportation costs, improving access and mobility, improving safety, and stimulating sustained job growth.

In this report, TRIP examines recent transportation and economic trends in Maryland and provides information on the transportation projects in the state that are most needed to support economic growth. Sources of data include the Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and the U.S. Census Bureau. All data used in the report is the latest available.

TRIP has identified and ranked the 40 transportation projects that are most needed to support Maryland’s economic growth. These projects are located throughout the state.

•            The most needed transportation improvements in Maryland include projects to build, expand or modernize roads, highways bridges and mass transit facilities These improvements would enhance economic development opportunities throughout the state by increasing mobility and freight movement, easing congestion, and making Maryland an attractive place to live, visit and do business.

•            TRIP ranked each transportation project based on a rating system that considered the following: short-term economic benefits, including job creation; the level of improvement in the condition of the transportation facility, including safety improvements; the degree of improvement in access and mobility; and the long- term improvement provided in regional or state economic performance and competitiveness.

•            Maryland’s 10 most needed transportation projects to support economic development in the state as determined by TRIP follow. Additional details on these and the other projects that make up the 40 most needed projects in Maryland for economic recovery and growth are included in the report’s Appendix.

1.Widening I-95/I-495 in Prince Georges and Montgomery Counties. This $5.8 billion project extends from the American Legion Bridge to the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and would include widening, the addition of HOV/HOT lanes and bridge rehabilitation and replacements. This project would relieve congestion and improve mobility and movement in the area immediately around Washington, DC. The initial phase of this project would likely be an $800 million project from the American Legion Bridge to I-270, which would include widening, the use of reversible lanes, HOT/HOV lanes and rehabilitation or replacement of the American Legion bridge. Job creation will be spurred in the short term by these projects, while long-term benefits include improved accessibility and greater regional productivity.

2.Replacing the Governor Nice Bridge in Charles County. This $885 million project would replace the existing Governor Nice bridge, which does not meet current standards and is reaching capacity during peak travel times. By 2025, traffic on the bridge is projected to increase by 45 percent on weekdays and 33 percent on weekends. This project will create construction jobs in the short term, while reducing travel times and fuel costs and promoting regional economic development in the long-term.

3.Widening and bridge rehabilitation and replacement on I-695 in Baltimore.

This $1.2 billion project would continue the efforts to widen I-695 and replace or rehabilitate deficient bridges. Completion of this project would alleviate congestion in the Baltimore area on the primary route for moving people and goods through the region and beyond. It would also reduce travel time and gasoline costs for Maryland citizens and visitors. The initial phase of this project would likely be the $85 million rehabilitation or replacement of three bridges.

4. Construction of the Purple Line from Bethesda to New Carrolton. This $1.9 billion project includes a two-track light rail line with dedicated running way, 21 stations and two maintenance facilities. The Purple Line is estimated to serve 60,000 riders per day in 2030. It will also provide faster, more reliable transit in congested corridors and connect directly to existing rail and bus service.

5.Widening and Interchanges on MD 5 in Prince George’s County. This $1.1 billion project would widen and add interchanges to 10.5 miles of MD 5 between US 301 and I-95/I-495. It will relieve congestion and improve operations along the MD 5 corridor while improving east-west movement in Prince George’s County. The project will create jobs in the short-term and will accommodate increased traffic volumes stemming from anticipated development along the MD 5 corridor in the long-term.

6.Widening MD 295 from four lanes to six. This $220 million project would widen more than three miles of MD 295 from MD 100 to I-195 in Baltimore. It would also provide a new interchange at Hanover Road with widening and relocation of Hanover Road from MD 295 to MD 170. Congestion will be eased and access would be improved to the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, one of the state’s economic engines.

7.Red Line Light Rail Transitway from Woodlawn to Bayview Medical Center.

This $2.2 billion project would add 14 miles of two-track light rail line with dedicated running way, 19 stations and a maintenance facility. The new line is projected to serve 57,000 riders per day in 2030, provide faster, more reliable transit in congested corridors, and connect directly to existing rail and bus services. It will provide key connectivity in this east/west corridor and to existing Metro, light rail and MARC transit services.

8.Widening US 29 Northbound. This $104 million project would widen the northbound section of US 29 from Seneca Drive to MD 175 from two lanes to three. This project will improve safety and reduce congestion on a major commuting route through Columbia between Washington and Baltimore. The southbound section is currently three lanes.

9.Interchange construction at MD 97 at MD 28 in Montgomery County. This $142 million project would construct an interchange at MD 97 and MD 28 in Montgomery County to relieve congestion and provide needed bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The project will support access to and from the Intercounty Connector and regional corridors of I-95 and I-270.

10.Interchange construction at MD 210 and Kerby Hill Road/Livingston Road. This $126 million project would convert the intersection of MD 210 and Kerby Hill Road/ Livingston Road into a grade-separtated interchange. Completion of the project would improve safety and operations along the corridor during peak hours and help improve north-to-south movement in southern Prince George’s County. The project will create jobs in the short term and will accommodate anticipated growth and development along the MD 210 corridor.

Transportation projects that improve the efficiency, condition or safety of a highway or transit route provide significant economic benefits by reducing transportation delays and costs associated with a deficient transportation system. Some benefits of transportation improvements include the following.

•            Improved business competitiveness due to reduced production and distribution costs as a result of increased travel speeds and fewer mobility barriers.

•            Improvements in household welfare resulting from better access to higher-paying jobs, a wider selection of competitively priced consumer goods, additional housing and healthcare options, and improved mobility for residents without access to private vehicles.

•            Gains in local, regional and state economies due to improved regional economic competitiveness, which stimulates population and job growth.

•            Increased leisure/tourism and business travel resulting from the enhanced condition and reliability of a region’s transportation system.

•            A reduction in economic losses from vehicle crashes, traffic congestion and vehicle maintenance costs associated with driving on deficient roads.

•            The creation of both short-term and long-term jobs.

•            Transportation projects that expand roadway or transit capacity produce significant economic benefits by reducing congestion and improving access, thus speeding the flow of people and goods while reducing fuel consumption.

•            Transportation projects that maintain and preserve existing transportation infrastructure also provide significant economic benefits by improving travel speeds, capacity, load-carry abilities and safety, and reducing operating costs for people and businesses. Such projects also extend the service life of a road, bridge or transit vehicle or facility, which saves money by either postponing or eliminating the need for more expensive future repairs.

•            Site Selection magazine’s 2010 survey of corporate real estate executives found that transportation infrastructure was the third most important selection factor in site location decisions, behind only work force skills and state and local taxes.

•            A 2007 analysis by the Federal Highway Administration found that every $1 billion invested in highway construction would support approximately 27,800 jobs, including approximately 9,500 in the construction sector, approximately 4,300 jobs in industries supporting the construction sector, and approximately 14,000 other jobs induced in non-construction related sectors of the economy.

•            The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

While Maryland’s diverse economy has been impacted by the recession, the state’s transportation system will need to accommodate projected future growth.

•            From 1990 to 2010, Maryland’s population increased by 21 percent, from approximately 4.8 million to approximately 5.8 million. Maryland’s population is expected to increase to 6.7 million by 2030.

•            From 1990 to 2010, annual vehicle-miles-of-travel (VMT) in the state increased by 38 percent, from approximately 40.5 billion VMT to 56.1 billion VMT. Based on travel and population trends, TRIP estimates that vehicle travel in Maryland will increase another 30 percent by 2030, reaching approximately 73 billion VMT.

•            Maryland’s unemployment rate nearly doubled from 3.3 percent in February 2008 to 6.5 percent in February 2012. The national unemployment rate was 8.5 percent in February 2012.

•            In 2012, Maryland is projected to have a 3.6 percent rate of economic growth, measured in real GSP, which is factored for price changes. This rate of growth is higher than the forecast 3.4 percent increase in national real GSP in 2012.

•            Maryland has benefited from a diverse economy, which includes significant employment in the following sectors: transportation, government services, food production (including fishing and agriculture), manufacturing and biotechnology.

Maryland’s economy is served by an extensive surface transportation system that has some deficiencies and experiences severe congestion in key areas. Roads carry the majority of freight shipped in the state.

•            Maryland’s system of 31,461 miles of roads and 5,195 bridges, maintained by local, state and federal governments, carry 55.3 billion vehicle miles of travel annually.

•            Forty-four percent of Maryland’s major roads are deficient, with 26 percent rated in poor condition and an additional 18 percent rated mediocre in 2008. An additional 15 percent of the state’s major roads were rated in fair condition and 41 percent were rated in good condition.

•            Seven percent of Maryland’s bridges were rated structurally deficient in 2011. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks, school buses and emergency services vehicles.

•            In 2011, 18 percent of Maryland’s bridges were rated as functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

•            Every year, approximately $131 billion in goods are shipped annually from sites in Maryland and another $205 billion in goods are shipped annually to sites in Maryland, mostly by truck.

•            Eighty-one percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Maryland are carried by trucks and another 13 percent are carried by parcel, U.S. Postal Service or courier services, which use trucks for part of the deliveries.

The full report can be viewed at: http://www.tripnet.org/docs/MD_TRIP_Report_April_2012.pdf

An appendix listing the 40 projects can be viewed at:

http://www.tripnet.org/docs/MD_Appendix_April_2012.pdf

Sources of data for this report include the Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT), the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau. All data used in the report is the latest available