Tag Archive for 'TRIP Report'

TRIP Reports: MISSOURI MOTORISTS LOSE $7.8 BILLION PER YEAR DRIVING ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES

MISSOURI MOTORISTS LOSE $7.8 BILLION PER YEAR DRIVING ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES– AS MUCH AS $2,031 PER DRIVER. LACK OF FUNDING WILL LEAD TO FURTHER DETERIORATION, INCREASED CONGESTION & HIGHER COSTS TO MOTORISTS

Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost Missouri motorists a total of $7.8 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,0311 per driver- due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge, and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Missouri, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation research group.

The TRIP report, Missouri Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Missouri, one-half of major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor or mediocre condition and 13 percent of locally and state-maintained bridges are structurally deficient. The report also finds that Missouri’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, causing significant delays and choking commuting and commerce.

Driving on Missouri roads costs the state’s drivers a total of $7.8 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the cost of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculates the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Columbia-Jefferson City, Kansas City, St. Louis and Springfield areas. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area, along with a statewide total, is below.

The TRIP report finds that 24 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads in Missouri are in poor condition and 28 percent are in mediocre condition. Nineteen percent of the state’s major roads are in fair condition and the remaining 29 percent are in good condition. Driving on rough roads costs the state’s motorists a total of $3 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

Traffic congestion throughout Missouri is worsening, causing up to 45 annual hours of delay for drivers in the largest urban area and costing the state’s drivers $2.4 billion each year in lost time and wasted fuel.

Thirteen percent of Missouri’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. This is the eleventh highest rate in the nation.

Traffic crashes in Missouri claimed the lives of nearly 4,200 people between 2012 and 2016. Missouri’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.28 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is higher than the national average of 1.18.  The fatality rate on Missouri’s non-interstate rural roads is nearly two and a half times that on all other roads in the state (2.15 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.88). The financial impact of traffic crashes costs the state’s drivers a total of $2.4 billion annually.

“TRIP’s study shows bad roads cost Missourians money and time in big and small ways that add up to considerable expense, stress, and frustration,” said Scott Charton, communications director for SaferMo.com. “Missouri voters have the opportunity on November 6 to do something to fix our roads by voting “YES” on Proposition D, which will provide more than $400 million annually in new road and bridge funding across Missouri, including a 66 percent increase in state funding for local priority projects. Missourians can take a positive step for safer roads and safer streets by supporting Prop D.”

The efficiency and condition of Missouri’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy.  Annually, $495 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Missouri, mostly by trucks, relying heavily on the state’s network of roads and bridges. Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to relocate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system. The design, construction, and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Missouri support more than 79,000 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy.

“Driving on deficient roads comes with a $7.8 billion price tag for Missouri motorists – as much as $2,031 per driver,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Adequate funding for the state’s transportation system would allow for smoother roads, more efficient mobility, enhanced safety, and economic growth opportunities while saving Missouri’s drivers time and money.”

MISSOURI KEY TRANSPORTATION FACTS

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

Driving on Missouri roads that are deteriorated, congested and that lack some desirable safety features costs Missouri drivers a total of $7.8 billion each year. TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on rough roads, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.

MISSOURI ROADS PROVIDE A ROUGH RIDE

Due to inadequate state and local funding, 52 percent of major roads and highways in Missouri are in poor or mediocre condition. Driving on rough roads costs the average Missouri driver $695 annually in additional vehicle operating costs.

MISSOURI BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Thirteen percent of Missouri’s bridges are structurally deficient (the eleventh highest share in the nation), meaning there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Most bridges are designed to last 50 years before major overhaul or replacement, although many newer bridges are being designed to last 75 years or longer. In Missouri, 40 percent of the state’s bridges (9,913 of 24,487) were built in 1969 or earlier.

MISSOURI ROADS ARE INCREASINGLY CONGESTED

Congested roads choke commuting and commerce and cost Missouri drivers $2.4 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. In the most congested urban areas, drivers lose up to $1,080 and nearly two full days each year in congestion.

MISSOURI TRAFFIC SAFETY AND FATALITIES

From 2012 to 2016, 4,163 people were killed in traffic crashes in Missouri. Traffic crashes imposed a total of $7.1 billion in economic costs in Missouri in 2016 and traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $2.4 billion in economic costs.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of Missouri’s economy is riding on its transportation system. Each year, $495 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Missouri, mostly by truck. Increases in passenger and freight movement will place further burdens on the state’s already deteriorated and congested network of roads and bridges.

The design, construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Missouri supports 79,083 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $2.9 billion annually. Approximately 1.3 million full-time jobs in Missouri in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation network.

 

 

 

 

 

TRIP Reports: The release of TRIP’s national rural roads report generated a good deal of news coverage…

The release of TRIP’s national rural roads report generated a good deal of news coverage when it was released last June and in the following months. Today, the report’s findings were quoted in the following White House briefing statement addressing America’s rural infrastructure needs. Click here to view online.

Building a Stronger America: Rural Communities Need Reliable, Modern Infrastructure

Infrastructure & Technology   Issued on: February 21, 2018

“No longer will we allow the infrastructure of our magnificent country to crumble and decay.”

President Donald J. Trump

RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE IS IN NEED OF REPAIR: Infrastructure systems across rural America have fallen into a state of disrepair, holding back rural communities.

  • More than a third of all major rural roads in the United States were in poor or mediocre condition in 2015 according to a report by TRIP, a national transportation research organization.
    • 15 percent of major rural roads were rated in poor condition.
    • 21 percent of major rural roads were rated in mediocre condition.
    • 14 states had 20 percent or more of their major rural roads rated in poor condition, with some states having around 40 percent in poor condition.
  • Ten percent of all rural bridges were rated as “structurally deficient” in 2016, according to TRIP.
  • Small community water systems, or systems that serve 3,300 people or fewer, have $64.5 billion in funding needs over a 20 year period according to a report by the Environmental Protection Agency.
    • Because small water systems lack economies of scale, small cities often experience the largest percentage increase in user charges and fees.
  • More than 100,000 miles of rail lines have been abandoned over the past few decades, reducing critical rail access in many rural communities.

INSUFFICIENT BROADBAND ACCESS: Far too many Americans living in rural communities lack sufficient broadband access. 

  • The high cost of rural broadband deployment has prevented commercial internet providers from installing broadband equipment in rural areas.
  • Insufficient broadband access has left many rural Americans without the tools they need to engage in the modern economy and use important services such as telemedicine and long-distance learning.
  • 39 percent of Americans living in rural areas, 23 million people, lack sufficient broadband access, according to a 2016 report by the Federal Communications Commission.

RURAL PROSPERITY DEPENDS ON INFRASTRUCTURE: It is time to give rural communities the quality infrastructure they need in order to grow and thrive.

  • 93 percent of rural Americans believe Federal investments in infrastructure are important to improving the job situation in their communities, according to a June 2017 poll published by The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation.
    • 74 percent of rural Americans polled believe infrastructure investments are “very important” to improving the job situation in their communities.
  • Many industries important to the rural economy require efficient infrastructure, including energy production, manufacturing, and agriculture.
  • Communities with agriculture dominant economies need reliable infrastructure in order to effectively conduct business.
    • Effective transportation systems help reduce the prices farmers must pay for operating supplies.
    • The agriculture industry relies on a variety of transportation methods such as trucking, rail, and waterways to maintain the agriculture supply chain.

The White House

TRIP Reports AMERICA’S RURAL ROADS & BRIDGES HAVE SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCIES & HIGH FATALITY RATES

AMERICA’S RURAL ROADS & BRIDGES HAVE SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCIES & HIGH FATALITY RATES; REPAIRS & MODERNIZATION NEEDED TO IMPROVE CONDITIONS, BOOST SAFETY & SUPPORT ECONOMIC GROWTH AND CONNECTIVITY

 America’s rural transportation system is in need of repairs and modernization to support economic growth in the nation’s Heartland, which is a critical source of energy, food and fiber. Rural America is home to an aging and increasingly diverse population that is heavily reliant on the quality of its transportation system. This is according to a new report released today by TRIP. The report, Rural Connections: Challenges and Opportunities in America’s Heartland, evaluates the safety and condition of the nation’s rural roads and bridges and finds that the nation’s rural transportation system is in need of improvements to address deficient roads and bridges, high crash rates, and inadequate connectivity and capacity. TRIP is a national non-profit transportation research group based in Washington, D.C. The chart below shows the states with the highest rate of rural pavements in poor condition, states with the highest share of structurally deficient rural bridges and those with the highest fatality rates on non-Interstate, rural roads.

The report finds that the nation’s rural roads and bridges have significant deficiencies. Fifteen percent of U.S. rural roads are rated in poor condition, while 21 percent are in mediocre condition. Sixteen percent of the nation’s rural roads are in fair condition and the remaining 48 percent are in good condition. Ten percent of the nation’s rural bridges are rated as structurally deficient, meaning there is significant deterioration to the major components of the bridge.

In addition to deteriorated roads and bridges, the TRIP report finds that traffic crashes and fatalities on rural non-Interstate roads are disproportionately high, occurring at a rate more than two-and-a-half times higher than on all other roads. In 2015, non-Interstate rural roads had a traffic fatality rate of 2.18 deaths for every 100 million vehicle miles of travel, compared to a fatality rate on all other roads of 0.83 deaths per 100 million vehicle miles of travel. The number of fatalities and the fatality rate on rural, non-Interstate U.S. roads increased in 2105 after decreasing each year between 2012 and 2014.

“Rural roads are far too often overlooked. With fatality rates rising, repairing and maintaining the nation’s roads must be a top priority for legislators,” said Kathleen Bower, AAA senior vice president of public affairs and international relations. “By investing in improvements for today and tomorrow, we can deliver safer experiences for motorists and save tens of thousands of lives.”

The quality of life in America’s small communities and rural areas, and the health of the nation’s rural economy, is highly reliant on the quality of the nation’s transportation system, particularly its roads, highways and bridges. America’s rural transportation system provides the first and last link in the supply chain from farm to market, connects manufacturers to their customers, supports the tourism industry, and enables the production of energy, food and fiber. Rural Americans are more reliant on the quality of their transportation system than their urban counterparts.

“Farmers and ranchers depend on rural roads, highways and bridges to move their products to market,” said Zippy Duvall, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation. “Transportation delays and costs take a bite out of our profitability and competitiveness and impact the quality of rural life.  Securing the appropriate resources at the local, state and federal levels will allow for the improvements needed to provide a rural transportation system that will keep goods moving and foster economic growth.”

The TRIP report finds that the U.S. needs to implement transportation improvements that will improve rural transportation connectivity, safety and conditions to provide the nation’s small communities and rural areas with safe and efficient access to support quality of life and enhance economic productivity. The nation’s ability to address its rural transportation challenges will be greatly enhanced if Congress is able to provide a long-term, dedicated, user-based revenue stream capable of fully funding the federal surface transportation program.

“We applaud the president, the new administration, and members of Congress for leading the conversation on an issue of critical importance to our 21st century economy: rebuilding America’s infrastructure,” said U.S. Chamber’s Executive Director for Transportation Infrastructure Ed Mortimer. “The American business community looks forward to developing and implementing a long-term plan that will bring our nation’s rural and urban infrastructure up to speed and spur economic growth. Now is the time to take action and to get the job done.”

Rural America is home to the vast majority of tourist destinations, many of which rely on good access. “Crumbling bridges, poorly maintained roads and congested highways discourage travel, threatening the entire U.S. economy,” said Erik Hansen, vice president of government relations for the U.S. Travel Association. “Lawmakers have signaled their interest in finding solutions for America’s surface transportation, as evidenced in passage of the FAST Act and the formation of the NACTTI advisory board. However, far more is needed–and fast–to finish the job.”

Freight mobility and efficiency is fundamental to rural economic vitality and prosperity. “It’s time for our elected leaders to act. Investing in our rural roads will improve safety and efficiency on roadways that are vital to agricultural commerce. That is a top priority for our nation’s 3.2 million farmers, and the 320,000 Americans whose jobs are supported by the manufacturing of farm equipment,” said Robert B. Crain, senior VP & general manager, North and South America, AGCO Corporation.

“The safety and quality of life in America’s small communities and rural areas and the health of the nation’s economy ride on our rural transportation system. The nation’s rural roads and bridges provide crucial links from farm to market, move manufactured and energy products, and provide access to countless tourism, social and recreational destinations,” said Will Wilkins, executive director of TRIP.  “Fixing the federal Highway Trust Fund with a long-term, sustainable source of revenue that supports the transportation investment needed will be crucial to the modernization of our rural transportation system.”

To read the full report and regional/state reports visit: TRIP Rural Roads Report

TRIP Reports: More Than One-Third Of Maine’s Bridges Are Structurally Deficient Or Functionally Obsolete; Bridge Conditions Are Projected To Deteriorate Further Without Additional Funding For Improvements And Replacement

TRIPMore than one-third of Maine’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, with bridge conditions projected to worsen in the future if additional funding is not made available, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Preserving Maine’s Bridges: The Condition and Funding Needs of Maine’s Bridge System finds that 15 percent of Maine’s state and locally maintained bridges are structurally deficient, which means there is significant deterioration of the bridge supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight vehicles or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks, school busses and emergency service vehicles. In Southern Maine, ten percent of bridges are structurally deficient. Eighteen percent of Maine’s bridges are functionally obsolete, meaning they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. In Southern Maine, 22 percent of bridges are functionally obsolete.

The list below highlights several critical structurally deficient bridges in the Portland area:

PORTLAND AREA:

Route 1 Bridge over the Cousins River in Freeport. This bridge, built in 1930, carries 8,954 vehicles per day. The substructure of the bridge is in poor condition.

Routes 11-114 over the Muddy River in Naples. This bridge, built in 1930, carries 1,593 vehicles per day. Recreational boat traffic travels underneath the bridge. The deck, substructure and substructure are in poor condition. This bridge is funded for replacement in 2016.

Routes 9 & 22 over the Stroudwater River in Portland.  This bridge, built in 1989, carries 23,826 vehicles per day. The substructure of the bridge is in poor condition.

Routes US 202 & 4 over the Little River in Gorham. This bridge, built in 1949, carries 5,452 vehicles per day. The deck and superstructure are in poor condition. This bridge is a candidate for replacement in 2017.

US 1 over Route 115/Main Street in Yarmouth. This bridge, built in 1948, carries 5,641 vehicles per day. The deck of the bridge is in poor condition. This bridge is a candidate for replacement in 2017.

The chart below includes a full list of the structurally deficient bridges in Southern Maine that carry at least 500 vehicles per day. A statewide list of the 205 structurally deficient bridges in Maine that carry at least 500 vehicles per day, as well as additional information, including condition ratings for key bridge components for each bridge, can be found in Appendix A.

PRESERVING MAINE’S BRIDGES:The Condition and Funding Needs of Maine’s Bridge System

Executive Summary

Maine’s bridges are a vital link within the state’s transportation system, providing the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. This transportation system forms the backbone that supports the state’s economy. Maine’s transportation system enables the state’s residents and visitors to travel to work and school, visit family and friends, and frequent tourist and recreation attractions while providing its businesses with reliable access to customers, materials, suppliers and employees.

To retain its businesses, accommodate population and economic growth, maintain its level of economic competitiveness and achieve further economic growth, Maine will need to maintain and modernize its bridges by repairing or replacing deficient bridges and providing needed maintenance on other bridges to insure that they remain in good condition as long as possible. Making needed improvements to Maine’s bridges could also provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long term economic growth as a result of preserved and enhanced mobility and access.

POPULATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MAINE

Population and economic growth in Maine have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads, highways and bridges, leading to additional wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Maine’s population reached approximately 1.3 million residents in 2014, an eight percent increase since 1990.
  • Maine had more than 1 million licensed drivers in 2013.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Maine increased by 19 percent from 1990 to 2013 –from 11.9 billion VMT in 1990 to 14.1 billion VMT in 2013.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Maine is projected to increase by another 15 percent.
  • From 1990 to 2013, Maine’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 32 percent, when adjusted for inflation.

MAINE BRIDGE CONDITIONS

One-third of locally and state-maintained bridges in Maine show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length. The number and share of Maine’s bridges that are in poor condition is increasing while the number and share of structurally deficient bridges in the U.S. is decreasing.

  • There are 2,515 bridges in Maine that are 20 feet or longer, and another 1,374 minor bridge spans between 10 and 20 feet.
  • The Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT) is responsible for maintaining approximately 70 percent (2,744) of bridges and minor spans in the state.
  • The share of state-maintained bridges in Maine that are at least 70 years old is increasing. In 2007, 25 percent of state-maintained bridges in Maine (675 of 2,722) were at least 70 years old.   In 2014, 28 percent of state-maintained bridges in Maine (776 of 2,744) were at least 70 years old.
  • Fifteen percent of Maine’s state-and locally maintained bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Eighteen percent of Maine’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • The share of state-maintained bridges rated poor has increased from nine percent in 2007 to 11 percent in 2014. The number of poor state-maintained bridges has increased 18 percent from 2007 to 2014.
  • The Maine Department of Transportation rates the condition of their bridges as poor, fair or good, with the criteria for rating a bridge as poor being similar to the federal criteria for rating a bridge as structurally deficient.
  • The share of U.S. bridges rated structurally deficient decreased from 12 to 10 percent from 2007 to 2014, and the number of structurally deficient U.S. bridges decreased 16 percent from 2007 to 2014.
  • The chart below details the percentage of Maine’s state and locally maintained bridges statewide and in each county that are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.

 

  • Maine 1In the Bangor region, which includes Penobscot and Piscataquis Counties, 15 percent of bridges are structurally deficient and 15 percent are functionally obsolete. Fourteen percent of bridges in Central Maine, which includes Kennebec and Somerset Counties, are structurally deficient while 20 percent are functionally obsolete. In Southern Maine, which includes Cumberland and York Counties, ten percent of bridges are structurally deficient and 22 percent are functionally obsolete.
  • The list below highlights several critical structurally deficient bridges in the Augusta, Bangor and Portland area.

AUGUSTA AREA:

Routes US 201 & 9 over Cobbossee Stream in Gardiner. This bridge, built in 1918, carries 14,050 vehicles per day. The bridge deck is in poor condition. This bridge is a candidate for replacement in 2018.

Route 24 over Cobbossee Stream in Gardiner. This bridge, built in 1933, carries 9,070 vehicles per day. The substructure of the bridge is in poor condition.

Water Street over old MCRR in downtown Augusta. This bridge, built in 1939, carries 4,837 vehicles per day and has pedestrian traffic and parking underneath. The deck of the bridge is in poor condition.

BANGOR AREA:

Ohio Street over I-95 in Bangor. This bridge, built in 1960, carries 9,998 vehicles per day and is funded for improvements in 2017. The deck of the bridge is in poor condition. This bridge is funded for replacement in 2017.

Stillwater Avenue over South Channel of Stillwater Avenue in Old Town. This bridge, built in 1952, carries 16,640 vehicles per day. The deck of the bridge is in poor condition. It is a direct route to the University and is a candidate for replacement in 2018.

Route 7 over I-95 in Plymouth. This bridge, built in 1962, carries 1,898 vehicles per day. The deck of the bridge is in poor condition and it is a candidate for deck replacement in 2017.

Pleasant Street over the Pleasant River in Milo. This bridge, built in 1936, carries 935 vehicles per day. The superstructure of the bridge is in poor condition and the truss is fracture critical. The bridge is a candidate for replacement in 2017.

PORTLAND AREA:

Route 1 Bridge over the Cousins River in Freeport. This bridge, built in 1930, carries 8,954 vehicles per day. The substructure of the bridge is in poor condition.

Routes 11-114 over the Muddy River in Naples. This bridge, built in 1930, carries 1,593 vehicles per day. Recreational boat traffic travels underneath the bridge. The deck, substructure and substructure are in poor condition. This bridge is funded for replacement in 2016.

Routes 9 & 22 over the Stroudwater River in Portland.  This bridge, built in 1989, carries 23,826 vehicles per day. The substructure of the bridge is in poor condition.

Routes US 202 & 4 over the Little River in Gorham. This bridge, built in 1949, carries 5,452 vehicles per day. The deck and superstructure are in poor condition. This bridge is a candidate for replacement in 2017.

US 1 over Route 115/Main Street in Yarmouth. This bridge, built in 1948, carries 5,641 vehicles per day. The deck of the bridge is in poor condition. This bridge is a candidate for replacement in 2017.

  • The charts below include a full list of the structurally deficient bridges in the Bangor region, Central Maine and Southern Maine that carry at least 500 vehicles each day (ADT). A statewide list of the 205 structurally deficient bridges in Maine that carry at least 500 vehicles per day, as well as additional information, including condition ratings for key bridge components for each bridge, can be found in Appendix A.

 

Maine 2 Maine 3 Maine 4PRESERVING MAINE’S BRIDGES

State and local transportation agencies are increasingly taking an asset management approach to bridge preservation that emphasizes enhanced maintenance techniques that keep infrastructure in good condition as long as possible, delaying the need for costly reconstruction or replacement.

  • Under pressure from fiscal constraints, aging bridges, and increased wear due to growing travel volume, particularly by large trucks, transportation agencies are adopting cost-effective strategies focused on keeping bridges in good condition as long as possible. While this strategy requires increased initial investment, it saves money over the long run by extending the lifespan of bridges.
  • Bridge preservation may include washing, sealing deck joints, facilitating drainage, sealing concrete, painting steel, removing channel debris, and protecting against stream erosion.
  • Rehabilitation involves major work required to restore the structural integrity of a bridge as well as work necessary to correct major safety defects.
  • Replacement projects include total replacements, superstructure replacements, and bridge widening.
  • The need to repair or replace high priority bridges may create a funding cycle that makes it difficult to keep pace with the needed preservation activities.

BRIDGE FUNDING IN MAINE

Investment in Maine’s bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. A lack of sufficient funding at all levels will make it difficult to adequately maintain and improve the state’s bridges. Maine faces a large backlog in funds needed to repair and maintain its bridges.

  • The current replacement cost of Maine’s state-maintained bridges is $7.56 billion.
  • Repairing and replacing poor bridges and preserving bridges in fair and good condition requires adequate and consistent funding.
  • MaineDOT’s current annual bridge funding is $70 million per year. This is the same level of annual investment from 2007 to 2009, before it increased to an average of $112 million per year from 2009 to 2013 as a result of the authorization of $160 million in TransCap bonds.
  • A recent MaineDOT report on future funding needs for Maine’s state-maintained bridges found that at an annual funding level of $70 million per year, the share of the state’s bridges currently in poor condition would triple by 2021, from 11 percent to 33 percent.
  • The report “Keeping our Bridges Safe 2014,” found that an annual bridge investment of $140 million was needed to maintain the state’s bridges in their current condition. An annual investment of $217 million in the state’s bridges would be needed to maintain the entire bridge system and substantially meet service, condition and safety goals.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MAINE

The efficiency of Maine’s transportation system, particularly its roads, highways and bridges, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses rely on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $30.9 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Maine and another $41.1 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Maine, mostly by truck.
  • Eighty-one percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Maine are carried by trucks and another 13 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2013 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.

Sources of information for this report include the Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Bridge Inventory, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau.

TRIP Reports: Deficient Roadways Cost Arkansas Motorists Approximately $2 Billion Annually. Costs Will Rise And Transportation Woes Will Worsen Without Funding Boost

TRIPRoads and bridges that are deficient, congested or lack desirable safety features cost Arkansas motorists a total of $2 billion statewide annually due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road and bridge conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Arkansas, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, “Arkansas Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility,” finds that, throughout Arkansas, nearly a third of major locally and state-maintained urban roads and highways and nearly a quarter of major rural roads and highways are in poor condition. Nearly a quarter of Arkansas’ bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year. And, Arkansas’ traffic fatality rate is the fifth highest nationally and the state’s rural non-interstate traffic fatality rate is more than three times the fatality rate on all other roads in the state.

Driving on deficient roads costs the state’s motorists approximately $2 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the cost of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. A breakdown of the costs statewide and per motorist in Little Rock area is below.

Arkansas 1The TRIP report finds that 32 percent of major locally and state-maintained urban roads in Arkansas are rated in poor condition and 42 percent are rated in mediocre condition or fair condition and the remaining 26 percent are rated good.   The report finds that 23 percent of major locally and state-maintained rural roads in Arkansas are rated in poor condition, 46 percent are rated in mediocre condition or fair condition and the remaining 31percent are rated good.

A total of 23 percent of Arkansas’ bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Seven percent of Arkansas’ bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional 16 percent of the state’s bridges are functionally obsolete, which means they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Deficient roads cost-segments-Arkansas-Little Rock“Safe and well-maintained highways are critical to Arkansas’ economic development,” said Commissioner Robert Moore, of the Arkansas Highway Commission. “Poor roads and highways cost Arkansans money and, in some cases, lives. While, on the other hand, adequate funding to improve Arkansas highways creates private-sector jobs, improves our business climate, attracts new business and industry, and keep motorists safe.”

Traffic crashes in Arkansas claimed the lives of 2,849 people between 2008 and 2012. Arkansas’ overall traffic fatality rate of 1.65 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012 is the fifth highest in the nation and significantly higher than the national traffic fatality rate of 1.13. Arkansas’ non-Interstate rural roads have a fatality rate in 2012 of 2.71 traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel, more than three times the fatality rate of 0.87 on all other roads and highways in the state.

The efficiency of Arkansas’ transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

The Federal surface transportation program is a critical source of funding in Arkansas. From 2008 to 2012, the federal government provided $1.42 for road improvements in Arkansas for every dollar the state paid in federal motor fees. In July, Congress approved an eight-month extension of the federal surface transportation program, which will now run through May 31, 2015. The legislation will also transfer nearly $11 billion into the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) to preserve existing levels of highway and public transportation investment through the end of May 2015.

“These conditions are only going to worsen if greater funding is not made available at the state and federal levels,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Congress can help by approving a long-term federal surface transportation program that provides adequate funding levels, based on a reliable funding source. If not, Arkansas is going to see its future federal funding threatened, resulting in fewer road and bridge repair projects, loss of jobs and a burden on the state’s economy.”

ARKANSAS TRANSPORTATION BY THE NUMBERS:

Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility

Ten Key Transportation Numbers in Arkansas

$2 Billion

 

$1,674

 

Driving on deficient roads costs Arkansas residents $2 billion annually statewide. These costs include additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. In the Little Rock urban area, the average driver loses $1,674 annually as a result of driving on deficient roads.
#5 Arkansas’ traffic fatality rate of 1.65 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is the fifth highest in the nation.
5702,849 On average, 570 people were killed annually in Arkansas traffic crashes from 2008 to 2012, a total of 2,849 fatalities over the five year period.
3X The fatality rate on Arkansas’ non-interstate rural roads is more than three that on all other roads in the state (2.71 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.87).
32%23% Thirty-two percent of Arkansas’ major locally and state-maintained urban roads and 23 percent of the state’s major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor condition.
23 % A total of 23 percent of Arkansas bridges are in need of repair, improvement or replacement. Seven percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient and 16 percent are functionally obsolete.
26 hours The average driver in the Little Rock urban area loses 26 hours each year as a result of traffic congestion.
$102 billion

$112 billion

Annually, $102 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Arkansas and another $112 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Arkansas, mostly by truck.
$1.42

 

From 2008 to 2012, the federal government provided $1.42 for road improvements in Arkansas for every dollar paid in federal motor fuel fees.
 

$1.00 = $5.20

The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs, and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Executive Summary

Arkansas’ extensive system of roads, highways and bridges provides the state’s residents, visitors and businesses with a high level of mobility. This transportation system forms the backbone that supports the state’s economy. Arkansas’ surface transportation system enables the state’s residents and visitors to travel to work and school, visit family and friends, and frequent tourist and recreation attractions while providing its businesses with reliable access to customers, materials, suppliers and employees.

Deficient roads cost-segments-Arkansas-StatewideAs Arkansas looks to retain its businesses, maintain its level of economic competitiveness and achieve further economic growth, the state will need to maintain and modernize its roads, highways and bridges by improving the physical condition of its transportation network and enhancing the system’s ability to provide efficient and reliable mobility for motorists and businesses. Making needed improvements to Arkansas’ roads, highways and bridges could also provide a significant boost to the state’s economy by creating jobs in the short term and stimulating long term economic growth as a result of enhanced mobility and access.

With a current unemployment rate of 6.0 percent and with the state’s population continuing to grow, Arkansas must improve its system of roads, highways and bridges to foster economic growth and keep businesses in the state. In addition to economic growth, transportation improvements are needed to ensure safe, reliable mobility and quality of life for all Arkansans. Meeting Arkansas’ need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways and bridges will require significant local, state and federal funding.

Congress will need to pass new legislation prior to the May 31 extension expiration to ensure prompt federal reimbursements to states for road, highway, bridge and transit repairs and improvements.

The level of funding and the provisions of the federal surface transportation program have a significant impact on highway and bridge conditions, roadway safety, transit service, quality of life and economic development opportunities in Arkansas.

An inadequate transportation system costs Arkansas residents a total of $2 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • TRIP estimates that Arkansas roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have poor pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $2 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear), the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.
  • TRIP has calculated that the average Little Rock driver loses $1,674 annually as a result of driving on roads that have deterioration, are congested or lack some desirable safety features.

Arkansas 2

Population and economic growth in Arkansas have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Arkansas’ population reached approximately 2.9 million in 2012, a 25 percent increase since 1990. Arkansas had 2,199,164 licensed drivers in 2012.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Arkansas increased by 60 percent from 1990 to 2012 – jumping from 21 billion VMT in 1990 to 33.5 billion VMT in 2012.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Arkansas is projected to increase by another 30 percent.
  • From 1990 to 2012, Arkansas’ gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 64 percent, when adjusted for inflation.

A lack of adequate local, state and federal funding has resulted in nearly a third of major urban roads and highways and nearly a quarter of major rural roads and highways in Arkansas having pavement surfaces in poor condition. These deteriorated conditions provide a rough ride and cost motorist in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • Thirty-two percent of Arkansas’ major locally and state-maintained urban roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, while an additional 42 percent of the state’s major urban roads are rated in mediocre or fair condition. Twenty-six percent are rated in in good condition.
  • Twenty-three percent of Arkansas’ major locally and state-maintained rural roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, while an additional 46 percent of the state’s major urban roads are rated in mediocre or fair condition. Thirty-one percent are rated in in good condition.
  • More than three-quarters of major urban roads in the Little Rock area are deteriorated. Fifty-three percent of major urban roads in Little Rock are in poor condition and an additional 26 percent are in mediocre condition. Twelve percent of major roads in Little Rock are in fair condition and the remaining nine percent are in good condition.
  • Driving on rough roads costs Arkansas motorists a total of $1.1 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • Roads rated in poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes. In some cases, poor roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • Driving on rough roads costs each Little Rock area motorist $902 annually per in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

Twenty-three percent of locally and state-maintained bridges in Arkansas show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Seven percent of Arkansas’ bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Sixteen percent of Arkansas’ bridges are functionally obsolete.       Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Arkansas’ traffic fatality rate is the fifth highest in the nation. Improving safety features on Arkansas’ roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • Between 2008 and 2012 a total of 2,849 people were killed in traffic crashes in Arkansas, an average of 570 fatalities per year.
  • Arkansas’ overall traffic fatality rate of 1.65 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012 is the fifth highest in the nation. The national traffic fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles of travel was 1.13 in 2012.
  • The fatality rate on Arkansas’ rural non-Interstate roads was 2.71 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2012, more than three times the 0.87 fatality rate on all other roads and highways in the state.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Arkansas, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

  • According to the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the average driver in the Little Rock urban area loses $545 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion.
  • The average commuter in the Little Rock urban area wastes 26 hours each year stuck in traffic.
  • The increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers. The increased levels of congestion can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company to consider expansion or even to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for employees, and higher consumer costs.

The efficiency of Arkansas’ transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses are increasingly reliant on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $102 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Arkansas and another $112 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Arkansas, mostly by truck.
  • Eighty-three percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Arkansas are carried by trucks and another ten percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number one site selection factor in a 2011 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.

The federal government is a critical source of funding for Arkansas’ roads, highways and bridges and provides a significant return to Arkansas in road and bridge funding based on the revenue generated in the state by the federal motor fuel tax.

  • If Congress decides to provide additional revenues into the federal Highway Trust Fund in tandem with authorizing a new federal surface transportation program, a number of technically feasible revenue options have been identified by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.
  • Numerous projects have been completed throughout Arkansas since 2005 that relied heavily on federal funding, including the widening of portions of I-40 and I-540 and the replacement of a US Highway 82 bridge over the Mississippi River in Chicot County. Appendix A details projects completed since 2005 as a result of significant federal transportation funding.
  • From 2008 to 2012, the federal government provided $1.42 for road improvements in Arkansas for every dollar the state paid in federal motor fuel fees.
  • Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD) has already suspended $60 million in planned construction projects due to the uncertainty of the future status of the Highway Trust Fund. Suspended projects include the replacement of the Highway 70 (Roosevelt Road) bridge and the Remount Road Bridge in Pulaski County, widening of five miles of Highway 167 in Independence County, and widening 1.5 miles of Highway 63 in Lawrence County. Further project suspensions and delays are anticipated until Congress resolves the looming insolvency of the Highway Trust Fund.
  • Many needed projects in Arkansas will require significant federal transportation funds to proceed, including the Springdale Northern Bypass, construction of a new three-lane arterial to provide a north-south corridor in northwest Arkansas, and the reconstruction of 8.5 miles of I-440 in the Little Rock area. A full list of projects can be found in Appendix B.
  • A significant boost in investment on the nation’s roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems is needed to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs, concluded a new report from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report found that annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges needs to increase from $88 billion to $120 billion and from $17 billion to $43 billion in the nation’s public transit systems, to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report also found that the current backlog in needed road, highway and bridge improvements is $740 billion.

Sources of information for this report include the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).