Tag Archive for 'trucks'

Terex Trucks signs new dealer in Texas

B-C Equipment Sales, Inc. is the new official dealer for Terex Trucks in South Texas. In operation for more than 30 years, the family-run business has built a solid reputation for itself and acquired a sizeable share of the Texan market, making it a valuable addition to the Terex Trucks dealer network.

When it comes to the mining industry, the phrase ‘Everything is bigger in Texas’ is most certainly true according to B-C Equipment Sales. With plentiful mineral resources, it is one of the main producers of cement, crushed stone, lime, salt, sand and gravel in America. It is also the leading crude oil and natural gas-producing state in the country. It is thereby no great surprise that construction equipment dealers do so well there. B-C Equipment Sales has been dominating the local market for the past 32 years, ever since Bill Lathrop and his wife Cathy decided to go into business together. With a reputation built on tradition and integrity, the family-run company has a customer network covering four major areas in South Texas: Corpus Christi, San Antonio, LaFeria, and Laredo.

B-C Equipment Sales’ first TA400 demo in South Texas.

Joining ‘Team Terex Trucks’

Earlier this year, B-C Equipment Sales signed a deal with Scotland-based Terex Trucks to be their official dealer in South Texas. They will be retailing, renting and leasing Terex Trucks’ TA300 and TA400 articulated haulers to customers as well as providing parts and service. The Texan dealer employs twelve technicians, who will be providing customers with a high quality, fast-response maintenance service. “We’re thrilled to represent Terex Trucks,” says Bill. “Like us, their goal is all about providing the best machines with the best customer service. With the demand for articulated haulers increasing like it is, we’re confident that our customers will be pleased to see that we are now offering proven performers like the TA300 and TA400.”

The TA300 is a proven performer in tough applications ranging from quarries to infrastructure developments and commercial construction projects. Powered by a Scania DC9 engine, this articulated hauler has a maximum payload of 30.9 tons, a maximum torque of 1309 lbs ft (1880 Nm) and can achieve a gross power of 370 hp. The TA400, Terex Trucks’ 41.9-ton articulated hauler, is the perfect fit for customers working on large-scale construction projects, mines, and quarries. With a heaped capacity of 30.3 yd3 and a maximum torque of 1663 lbs ft, it can put in a serious performance. Both machines also come with hydrostatic power steering and hydraulic braking systems, helping to ensure a safe and comfortable ride.

Family values

“Choosing to partner with B-C Equipment Sales ultimately came down to two factors that really differentiate them from their competitors,” says Dan Meara, Terex Trucks Regional Sales Manager. “Firstly, they have an incredibly strong reputation built on trust, quality, and tradition. As a company, they are all about people, which means they always go the extra mile to give their customers a fantastic service. In addition to this, B-C Equipment Sales has longevity. Having been a leading supplier of construction equipment for more than 30 years, customers can be assured that they will be around to support their machines for the long haul.”

B-C Equipment Sales is and always has been a family-run business. Bill oversees the strategy and day-to-day operations with the support of Cathy. One of their daughters, Sarah Baugh, heads up the marketing department and her husband, Chris Baugh, leads the sales team. Their other daughter, Melanie Lathrop, works in accounts receivable. “We’re known for the quality of our customer service, so much so that we often get people calling us about parts we’ve never stocked because they know we’ll find a way to source them,” concludes Bill. “Our customers know we will go above and beyond to ensure they have what they need to keep running smoothly.”

www.terextrucks.com

 

TRIP Report: ILLINOIS MOTORISTS LOSE $16.4 BILLION ANNUALLY ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES- NEARLY $2,500 PER DRIVER

ILLINOIS MOTORISTS LOSE $16.4 BILLION ANNUALLY ON ROADS THAT ARE ROUGH, CONGESTED & LACK SOME SAFETY FEATURES- NEARLY $2,500 PER DRIVER IN SOME AREAS. LACK OF FUNDING WILL LEAD TO FURTHER DETERIORATION, INCREASED CONGESTION AND HIGHER COSTS TO MOTORISTS

 Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features cost Illinois motorists a total of $16.4 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,485 per driver in some urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Illinois, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Illinois Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Illinois, more than one-third of major locally and state-maintained urban roads are in poor or mediocre condition and nine percent of locally and state-maintained bridges are structurally deficient. The report also finds that Illinois’ major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, causing significant delays and choking commuting and commerce.

Illinois motorists lose a total of $16.4 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculates the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Chicago, Champaign-Urbana, Metro East, Peoria-Bloomington, Rockford and Springfield urban areas. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area, along with a statewide total, is below.

The TRIP report finds that 27 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads in Illinois are in poor condition and nine percent are in mediocre condition, costing the state’s motorist an additional $3.5 billion each year in extra vehicle operating costs. These costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

“Illinois’ infrastructure is vital to propel the state forward as an economic powerhouse,” said Illinois Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Todd Maisch. “From Chicago to the Metro East, this report, which reflects similar numbers to that of Illinois state agencies, reveals the reality of Illinois’ transportation systems from congestion to safety. Knowing where our state stands in these areas is crucial to understanding our state’s needs.”

Nine percent of Illinois’ bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components.

The Illinois Department of Transportation projects that, under current funding levels, the percentage of state-maintained roads and bridges in need of repairs will increase significantly in the next five years.

Traffic congestion in the state’s largest urban areas is worsening, causing as many as 63 annual hours of delay for the average motorist and costing each driver as much as $1,484 annually in lost time and wasted fuel.

Traffic crashes in Illinois claimed the lives of 4,947 people between 2012 and 2016. Illinois’ overall traffic fatality rate of 1.01 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is lower than the national average of 1.18. The fatality rate on Illinois’ non-interstate rural roads is approximately three times higher than on all other roads in the state (2.28 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.78). The financial impact of traffic crashes cost Illinois drivers a total of $4.7 billion annually.

The efficiency and condition of Illinois’ transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $2.9 trillion in goods are shipped to, from and within Illinois, relying heavily on the state’s network of roads and bridges. Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system. The design, construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Illinois supports 154,001 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy.

“These conditions are only going to get worse, increasing the additional costs to motorists, if greater investment is not made available at the state and local levels of government,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without adequate funding, Illinois’ transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and congested, hampering economic growth, safety and quality of life.”

Illinois KEY Transportation FACTS

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

Driving on Illinois roads that are deteriorated, congested and that lack some desirable safety features costs Illinois drivers a total of $16.4 billion each year. TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in the state’s largest urban areas in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on rough roads, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion and the financial cost of traffic crashes.

 

ILLINOIS ROADS PROVIDE A ROUGH RIDE

Due to inadequate state and local funding, more than one of every three miles of major urban roads and highways in Illinois are in poor or mediocre condition.  The condition of state-maintained roads and bridges in Illinois is anticipated to decline through 2023 based on current funding.

 

ILLINOIS BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Nine percent of Illinois’ bridges are structurally deficient, meaning there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. The condition of state-maintained bridges in Illinois is anticipated to decline through 2023 based on current funding.

ILLINOIS ROADS ARE INCREASINGLY CONGESTED

Congested roads choke commuting and commerce and cost Illinois drivers $8.2 billion each year in the form of lost time and wasted fuel. Drivers in the state’s largest urban areas lose thousands of dollars and as much as two-and-a-half days each year in congestion.

 

ILLINOIS TRAFFIC SAFETY AND FATALITIES

Nearly 5,000 people were killed in traffic crashes in Illinois in the last five years. Traffic crashes in which roadway features were likely a contributing factor imposed $4.7 billion in economic costs in 2016.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The health and future growth of Illinois’ economy is riding on its transportation system. Each year, $2.9 trillion in goods are shipped to, from and within Illinois, mostly by truck. Projected increases in passenger and freight movement will place further burdens on the state’s already deteriorated and congested network of roads and bridges. By 2045, total freight tonnage being shipped in, out and within Illinois is projected to grow by 40 percent, with 70 percent of the added tonnage moved by truck.

The design, construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure in Illinois supports 154,001 full-time jobs across all sectors of the state economy. These workers earn $6.5 billion annually. Approximately 2.6 million full-time jobs in Illinois in key industries like tourism, manufacturing, retail sales, agriculture are completely dependent on the state’s transportation infrastructure network.

Each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

For the full report visit:

Illinois Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility

Clockwork Concrete Pour – finished on time

FCA Announces Plan to Invest More than $1 billion in Michigan Plant, Add 2,500 New Jobs and Pay $2,000 Bonus to U.S. Employees; Actions Supported by U.S. Tax Reform

  • Investment will modernize Warren Truck Assembly to produce Ram Heavy Duty
  • Ram Heavy Duty truck production will relocate from Mexico to Michigan in 2020
  • Plant will add 2,500 new U.S. jobs to support production of heavy-duty truck
  • Approximately 60,000 FCA employees in the U.S. will receive special bonus payment
  • Total U.S. investment grows to more than $10 billion since 2009, with over 25,000 jobs created to date
  • Production move solidifies the U.S. as the global manufacturing hub for Ram products

FCA announced today two actions made possible in part by the passage of U.S. tax reform legislation late last year – an additional investment in its U.S. manufacturing operations and a special payment to recognize employees for their continued efforts towards the success of the Company.

First, the Company confirmed that it will invest more than $1 billion to modernize the Warren Truck Assembly Plant (Michigan) to produce the next generation Ram Heavy Duty truck, which will relocate from its current production location in Saltillo, Mexico, in 2020. This investment is in addition to the announcement made in January 2017 which committed to spending a portion of $1 billion in Warren Truck Assembly to expand the Jeep® product line with the addition of the all-new Jeep Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer. The Saltillo Truck Assembly Plant will be repurposed to produce future commercial vehicles for global distribution.

To support the increased volume at the Warren facility, 2,500 new jobs will be created, above and beyond the jobs announced as part of the January 2017 announcement.

Second, the Company confirmed that it will make a special bonus payment of $2,000 to approximately 60,000 FCA hourly and salaried employees in the U.S., excluding senior leadership. The payment, which recognizes employees for their continued commitment to the Company’s success, will be made in the second quarter of this year, and will be in addition to any profit sharing and salaried performance bonuses that employees would otherwise be eligible to receive in 2018. The special bonus will be paid to all eligible employees of the FCA automotive and components operations in the U.S.

“These announcements reflect our ongoing commitment to our U.S. manufacturing footprint and the dedicated employees who have contributed to FCA’s success,” said Sergio Marchionne, Chief Executive Officer, FCA. “It is only proper that our employees share in the savings generated by tax reform and that we openly acknowledge the resulting improvement in the U.S. business environment by investing in our industrial footprint accordingly.”

Investment in U.S. Manufacturing Grows
FCA has invested $10 billion in its U.S. manufacturing operations since June 2009. Most recently, the Company announced investments totaling $3.5 billion, with the addition of 3,700 new jobs, to strengthen its U.S. manufacturing base, and align U.S. capacity to extend the Jeep and Ram product lines.

Those investments and related actions involved production shifts at three plants in Illinois, Ohio, and Michigan to gain the capacity for the Jeep Cherokee, Jeep Wrangler and Ram Light Duty truck, and the introduction of three new Jeep models at plants in Ohio and Michigan.

The investments include:

  • $350 million in the Belvidere Assembly Plant (Illinois) to produce the Jeep Cherokee, which moved from Toledo, Ohio in 2017. More than 300 new jobs were added to support production.
  • $700 million in the Toledo Assembly Complex (Ohio) to retool the North plant to produce the next generation Jeep Wrangler. Approximately 700 new jobs will be added to support production.
  • $1.5 billion in the Sterling Heights Assembly Plant (Michigan) to build the next generation Ram 1500 truck. More than 700 new jobs will be added to support production.
  • $1 billion in the south plant of the Toledo Assembly Complex to prepare the facility to produce an all-new Jeep truck, and in the Warren Truck Assembly Plant to modernize the plant to build the all-new Jeep Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer. More than 2,000 new jobs will be added at these two plants to support production.

The plant investment actions announced today are subject to the negotiation and final approval of incentives by state and local entities.

About FCA
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. (“FCA”), the seventh-largest automaker in the world based on total annual vehicle sales, is an international automotive group. FCA is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “FCAU” and on the Mercato Telematico Azionario under the symbol “FCA.”

Electronic Logging Deadline Looms Large for Construction Companies