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U.S. Interstate Highway System Turns 60 Years Old Amid Increased Travel, Rising Congestion; Surging Travel And Insufficient Funding To Make Needed Improvements. Interstate System Continues To Save Lives, Time And Money While Easing Personal And Commercial Mobility

Trip LogoAs the U.S. Interstate Highway System turns 60 years old this week, it faces increasing congestion, unprecedented levels of travel – particularly by large trucks – and insufficient funding to make needed repairs and improvements. The nation’s most critical transportation link continues to save lives with its enhanced safety features and is largely well-preserved, but an aging Interstate system will increasingly require more long-term, costly repairs, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, “The Interstate Highway System Turns 60: Challenges to Its Ability to Continue to Save Lives, Time and Money” finds that while the Interstate Highway System represents only 2.5 percent of lane miles in the U.S., it carries 25 percent of the nation’s vehicle travel. The system is increasingly congested, with truck travel growing at a rate twice that of overall Interstate travel. And, while the nation’s Interstates tend to be in better condition than other roads and bridges, the aging system lacks the required funding for needed improvements and repairs.

The chart below details the top 10 states whose Interstate systems have the highest levels of congestion, the largest share of large truck travel, the highest increase in travel from 2000-2014, the highest share of pavements in poor and mediocre condition, the highest rate of structurally deficient bridges, and the largest number of lives saved annually. Data for all 50 states can be found in the report’s Appendix.

TRIP 60 1

“Drivers are frustrated with the condition of the nation’s transportation system,” said Jill Ingrassia, AAA’s managing director of government relations and traffic safety advocacy. “While a record 36 million travelers plan to hit the road for Independence Day weekend, nearly 70 percent are concerned that roads and bridges are not in great driving condition. AAA urges lawmakers to keep their eye on the ball to identify a sustainable funding source to maintain and improve our Interstate system for the future.”

The current backlog of needed improvements to the Interstate Highway System, as estimated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, is $189 billion. The nation’s current transportation investment is less than two-thirds (61 percent) of the amount needed to keep Interstates in good condition and make the improvements necessary to meet the nation’s growing need for personal and commercial mobility. And, while the recently enacted federal surface transportation program, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST Act) provides a modest increase in spending, it lacks a long-term, sustainable revenue source. By 2020 the shortfall into the nation’s Highway Trust Fund will be $16 billion annually.

“The United States moves in large part thanks to the efforts of many elected officials, organizations and citizens whose shared foresight led to the construction of the national interstate system,” said Bud Wright, executive director of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. “Now, as we commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Interstate act, it’s clear that our investments in preserving the system are not keeping up even as our nation continues to grow.”

Since 2000 travel on the Interstate system is increasing two times faster than new lane capacity is being added. As a result, 43 percent of urban Interstate highways are considered congested during peak hours and the average annual amount of travel per Interstate lane mile increased by 11 percent from 2000 to 2014. Travel by combination trucks on the Interstate increased by 29 percent from 2000 to 2014, more than double the 14 percent rate of growth for all Interstate vehicle travel during the same period.

“It’s hard to believe it’s been 60 years since the Interstate Highway System was developed,” said Ed Mortimer, executive director for transportation infrastructure at the United States Chamber of Commerce. “The vision of President Eisenhower has enabled economic mobility throughout our nation and showed we can accomplish big things. As we work to maintain, and in many cases rebuild this great system, let’s continue to think big as we work to fund and finance an improved, smarter network.”

Travel on the nation’s Interstate highways has surged since 2014. In 2015 vehicle miles of travel on the Interstate Highway System was four percent higher than in 2014 and through the first three months of 2016 travel on the Interstate Highway System was five percent higher than during the first three months of 2015.

The design of the Interstate – which includes a separation from other roads and rail lines, a minimum of four lanes, paved shoulders and median barriers – makes it more than twice as safe to travel on as all other roadways. The fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles of travel on the Interstate in 2014 was 0.54, compared to 1.26 on non-Interstate routes. TRIP estimates that the Interstate Highway System saved 5,359 lives in 2014, based on an estimate of the number of additional fatalities that would have occurred had Interstate traffic been carried by other major roadways, which often lack the safety features common to Interstate routes.

While the condition of Interstate pavement and bridges is acceptable, some deficiencies exist. Twelve percent of Interstate highways are in poor or mediocre condition. Three percent of Interstate bridges are structurally deficient and an additional 18 percent are functionally obsolete. Structurally deficient bridges have significant deterioration of the major components of the bridge, while functionally obsolete bridges no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

“The long-term vision that helped establish the current Interstate system 60 years ago is needed again today,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “In order to maintain personal and commercial mobility, transportation investment and a sustainable, long-term funding source for the federal surface transportation program must remain a priority.”

The above highlighted links will take you to the full report, including the executive summary and appendix of supporting charts and graphs.

or you can scan: Trip ReportTRIP Report qrcode-9

Appendix:TRIP Appendix qrcode-10

Liebherr Announces The Formation Of Liebherr USA, Co. To Further Expand Its Brand Positioning In The U.S.

Liebherr leverages the organization’s capabilities and announces the formation of Liebherr USA, Co., a simpler structure with a broader reach. 

Liebherr began operation in 1949 with Hans Liebherr and the invention of the TK10, the first mobile tower crane.  The company that once employed 110 people and recorded net sales of $ 1.27 million USD in 1950 is now one of the world’s largest and most successful manufacturers of construction and earthmoving machinery employing more than 41,000 people in 50 countries with total sales of $10.3 billion USD in 2015.

Liebherr’s success and expansion in North America followed a similar pattern to its success in Europe and throughout the world.  Liebherr’s commitment to the United States market began in 1970 with the construction of its manufacturing facilities and North American headquarters in Newport News, VA. Over the years  new companies were formed  to fulfill customer needs in different industries.

“As we continue to grow our brand in the United States we are transitioning into a mixed-sales company” said Dr. Torben Reher, Managing Director of Liebherr USA, Co. “We are confident that this new platform will leverage the existing know-how and expertise among Liebherr divisions providing Liebherr business partners and customers with an exceptional and consistent experience in the United States,” Reher continued.

Liebherr USA, Co., the newly formed mixed-sales organization, will serve as the umbrella company and the existing Liebherr sales and service companies will become divisions of Liebherr USA, Co.  Excluded are Liebherr-Aerospace Saline, Inc., Liebherr Gear Technology, Inc., Liebherr Automation Systems, Co., and Liebherr Mining Equipment Newport News, Co.  However, sales and service for mining equipment in the U.S. will be incorporated into Liebherr USA, Co.

“Liebherr USA, Co. will allow us to approach our customers more efficiently and ultimately increase customer satisfaction in the US.”  said, Peter Mayr, Managing Director of Liebherr USA, Co. and Head of the Liebherr Construction Equipment Division.

Liebherr USA, Co. will be organized into eight different divisions as illustrated in the diagram below.

Liebherr USA organization_2 4In practical terms, all points of contact and business relationships will remain the same for our business partners and all contracts/programs/arrangements/agreements will remain in effect.

Daniel Pitzer, Managing Director of Liebherr USA, Co. and Head of the Mobile and Crawler Cranes Division, stated, “Liebherr in the United States is an amazing success story that was made possible by our loyal American customers. The formation of Liebherr USA, Co. will elevate our organization to a higher level.” Pitzer ended by saying, “I’m extremely proud and excited for our customers and for Liebherr to ‘Be Part of something BIGGER’ going forward!” making reference to Liebherr’s new company and emphasizing the strong statement Liebherr made earlier this year during Bauma.

The new organization will become effective on June 1, 2016. Liebherr USA, Co. will be led by a team consisting of three managing directors who will be responsible for providing strategic direction.

Effective June 1, 2016 the following companies will be incorporated into Liebherr USA, Co: Liebherr-America, Inc.,(including Tower Cranes, Refrigerators and Freezers),  Liebherr Components North America, Co., Liebherr Concrete Technology, Co. Liebherr Construction Equipment, Co., Liebherr Equipment Source, Liebherr Cranes, Inc., Liebherr Mining Equipment Newport News, Co. (Sales & Service in the U.S. only) and  Liebherr Nenzing Crane, Co. Excluded are Liebherr-Aerospace Saline, Inc., Liebherr Gear Technology, Inc., Liebherr Automation Systems, Co., and Liebherr Mining Equipment Newport News Co.

About Liebherr 

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TRIP Report: Deficient, Congested Roadways Cost Wisconsin Drivers $2,072 Annually, $6 Billion Statewide

Deficient, Congested Roadways Cost Wisconsin Drivers As Much As $2,072 Annually, A Total Of $6 Billion Statewide. Costs Will Rise And Transportation Woes Will Worsen Without Increased Funding

 Roads and bridges that are deficient, congested or lack desirable safety features cost Wisconsin motorists a total of $6 billion statewide annually – as much as $2,072 per driver in the state’s larger urban areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Wisconsin, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Wisconsin Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Wisconsin, 42 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads are in mediocre to poor condition and another 39 percent are in fair condition. Fourteen percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year. And 2,743 people were killed annually in crashes on Wisconsin’s roads from 2011 to 2015, with traffic fatalities increasing 13 percent in 2015 to 556 from 494 in 2014.

Driving on deficient roads costs each Milwaukee area driver $2,060 per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. Drivers in the Madison urban lose an average of $2,072 annually as a result of driving on deficient roads. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area along with a statewide total is below.

WI 1The TRIP report finds that 56 percent of major roads in the Milwaukee urban area are in poor to mediocre condition, costing the average motorist an additional $861 each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear. Sixty-eight percent of major roads in Madison are in poor to mediocre condition, costing each driver $974 each year.

“An efficient transportation infrastructure with adequate capacity is the circulatory system of a healthy economy,” said Steve Baas, senior vice president for governmental affairs and public policy at the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce (MMAC).   “Road congestion throughout our region clogs the arteries of commerce and threatens the life and health of our business climate.”

Traffic congestion in the Milwaukee area is worsening, causing 38 hours of delay a year for the average motorist and costing each driver $987 annually in lost time and wasted fuel. The average Madison driver loses 36 hours annually as a result of congestion, while the annual cost of lost time and wasted fuel for each Madison driver is $911.

A total of 14 percent of Wisconsin’s bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Nine percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional five percent of the state’s bridges are functionally obsolete, which means they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. In the Milwaukee urban area, six percent of bridges are structurally deficient and 24 percent are functionally obsolete. Nine percent of Madison area bridges are structurally deficient, while nine percent are functionally obsolete.

Wisconsin’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is lower than the national average of 1.08. The state’s rural roads have a traffic fatality rate that is more than double than the rate on all other roads in the state (1.24 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel versus 0.54). TRIP estimates that roadway features may be a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.

The efficiency and condition of Wisconsin’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $264 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Wisconsin and another $236 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Wisconsin, mostly by truck.

“These conditions are only going to get worse if greater funding is not made available at the local, state and federal levels,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without additional transportation funding Wisconsin transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and congested, the state will miss WI_TRIP_Infographics_May_2016out on opportunities for economic growth and quality of life will suffer.”

WISCONSIN TRANSPORTATION

BY THE NUMBERS:

Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and

Efficient Mobility

Ten Key Transportation Numbers in Wisconsin

 

$6 billion

Driving on deficient roads costs Wisconsin motorists a total of $6 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.
 

Madison: $2,072 Milwaukee: $2,060

 

TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in Wisconsin’s largest urban areas in the form of additional VOC, congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. The average Madison area driver loses $2,072 annually, while each Milwaukee area driver loses $2,060.
2,743

13 %

62

A total of 2,743 people were killed in Wisconsin traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015. The number of traffic fatalities increased by approximately 13 percent between 2014 and 2015, increasing by 62 deaths from 494 to 556.
2 X The fatality rate on Wisconsin’s non-interstate rural roads is more than double that on all other roads in the state (1.24 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.54).
42% Statewide

68% Madison

56% Milwaukee

Statewide, 42 percent of Wisconsin’s major roads are in mediocre to poor condition. Sixty-eight percent of major roads in the Madison urban area are in mediocre to poor condition, while in the Milwaukee urban area 56 percent of major roads are in mediocre to poor condition.
$264 B

$236 B

Annually, $264 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Wisconsin and another $236 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Wisconsin, mostly by truck.
 

14%

A total of 14 percent of Wisconsin bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards. Nine percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient and five percent are functionally obsolete.
36 hours

38 hours

 

The average driver in the Madison area loses 36 hours to congestion annually, while each driver in the Milwaukee urban area loses 38 hours annually.
 

$274

33

A recent analysis by WisDOT found that the average Wisconsin motorists pays $274 annually in state and local registration-related fees and gas taxes, a level ranked 33rd nationally among states.
 

 

1,393,428

$54.8 B

$10 B

1,393,428 full-time jobs in Wisconsin in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation infrastructure network. These workers earn $54.8 billion in wages and contribute an estimated $10 billion in state and local income, corporate and unemployment insurance taxes and the federal payroll tax.

 

 

Eight years after the nation suffered a significant economic downturn, Wisconsin’s economy continues to rebound. The rate of economic growth in Wisconsin, which will be greatly impacted by the reliability and condition of the state’s transportation system, continues to have a significant impact on quality of life in the Badger State.

An efficient, safe and well-maintained transportation system provides economic and social benefits by affording individuals access to employment, housing, healthcare, education, goods and services, recreation, entertainment, family, and social activities. It also provides businesses with access to suppliers, markets and employees, all critical to a business’ level of productivity and ability to expand. Reduced accessibility and mobility – as a result of traffic congestion, a lack of adequate capacity, or deteriorated roads, highways, bridges and transit facilities – diminishes a region’s quality of life by reducing economic productivity and limiting opportunities for economic, health or social transactions and activities.

With an economy based largely on agriculture, food, paper and beverage production, manufacturing, health care, education and tourism, the quality of Wisconsin’s transportation system plays a vital role in the state’s economic growth and quality of life.

In this report, TRIP looks at the top transportation numbers in Wisconsin as the state addresses its need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways, bridges and transit.

In December 2015 the president signed into law a long-term federal surface transportation program that includes modest funding increases and allows state and local governments to plan and finance projects with greater certainty through 2020. The Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act) provides approximately $305 billion for surface transportation with highway and transit funding slated to increase by approximately 15 and 18 percent, respectively, over the five-year duration of the program. While the modest funding increase and certainty provided by the FAST Act are a step in the right direction, the funding falls far short of the level needed to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs and fails to deliver a

COST TO WISCONSIN MOTORISTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

An inadequate transportation system costs Wisconsin motorists a total of $6 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • TRIP estimates that Wisconsin roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have deteriorated pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $6 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear), the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.
  • TRIP has calculated the average cost to drivers in the state’s largest urban areas as a result of driving on roads that are deteriorated, congested or lack some desirable safety features. The chart below details the costs to drivers statewide and in the Madison and Milwaukee urban areas.

WI 2POPULATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN WISCONSIN

The rate of population and economic growth in Wisconsin have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Wisconsin’s population reached approximately 5.8 million residents in 2015, an eight percent increase since 2000.
  • Wisconsin had 4.2 million licensed drivers in 2014.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Wisconsin increased by five percent from 2000 to 2014 –from 57.3 billion VMT in 2000 to 60.1 billion VMT in 2014.
  • Vehicle miles of travel in Wisconsin in 2015 were 4.2 percent higher than in 2014. U.S. vehicle miles of travel in 2015 were 3.5 percent higher than in 2014.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Wisconsin is projected to increase by another 25 percent.
  • From 2000 to 2014, Wisconsin’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 18 percent, when adjusted for inflation. U.S. GDP increased 24 percent during this time.

WISCONSIN ROAD CONDITIONS

A lack of adequate state and local funding has resulted in more than two-fifths of major locally and state-maintained roads and highways in Wisconsin having pavement surfaces in mediocre to poor condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorists in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • The pavement data in this report, which is for all arterial and collector roads and highways, is provided by the Federal Highway Administration, based on data submitted annually by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) on the condition of major state and locally maintained roads and highways in the state.
  • Pavement data for Interstate highways and other principal arterials is collected for all system mileage, whereas pavement data for minor arterial and all collector roads and highways is based on sampling portions of roadways as prescribed by FHWA to insure that the data collected is adequate to provide an accurate assessment of pavement conditions on these roads and highways.
  • Statewide, 42 percent of Wisconsin’s major locally and state-maintained roads and highways are in mediocre to poor condition, while 39 percent are in fair condition and 19 percent are in good to excellent condition.
  • Roads rated in mediocre to poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes. In some cases, these roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • The chart below details pavement conditions on major locally and state-maintained urban roads in the Madison and Milwaukee urban areas:
  • WI 3Driving on rough roads costs Wisconsin motorists a total of $3.2 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. The average driver in the Madison urban area loses $974 annually, while in the Milwaukee urban area the average driver loses $861 each year as a result of driving on deteriorated roads. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

WISCONSIN BRIDGE CONDITIONS

Fourteen percent of locally and state-maintained bridges in Wisconsin show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Nine percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Five percent of Wisconsin’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • The chart below details bridge conditions statewide and in the Madison and Milwaukee urban areas:

WI 4HIGHWAY SAFETY AND FATALITY RATES IN WISCONSIN

Improving safety features on Wisconsin’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • A total of 2,743 people were killed in Wisconsin traffic crashes from 2011 to 2015.
  • The number of traffic fatalities in Wisconsin increased by approximately 13 percent between 2014 and 2015, increasing by 62 deaths from 494 to 556.
  • Wisconsin’s overall traffic fatality rate of 0.84 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2014 was lower than the national average of 1.08.
  • The fatality rate on Wisconsin’s non-interstate rural roads in 2014 was more than double that on all other roads in the state (1.24 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.54).
  • The chart below details the average number of fatalities from 2012 to 2014 in the Madison and Milwaukee areas, and the average cost per driver as a result of traffic crashes.
  • WI 5Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

WISCONSIN TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Wisconsin, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

  • Based on Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) estimates, the value of lost time and wasted fuel in Wisconsin is approximately $1.7 billion per year.
  • According to TTI, the average driver in the Madison urban area loses $911 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion. The average Madison commuter wastes 36 hours each year stuck in traffic.
  • According to TTI, the average driver in the Milwaukee urban area loses $987 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion. The average Milwaukee commuter wastes 38 hours each year stuck in traffic.
  • Increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers and can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company when considering expansion or where to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for drivers and employees, and higher consumer costs.

TRANSPORTATION FUNDING IN WISCONSIN

Investment in Wisconsin’s roads, highways and bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. The recently approved five-year federal surface transportation program includes modest funding increases and provides states with greater funding certainty, but falls far short of providing the level of funding needed to meet the nation’s highway and transit needs. The bill does not include a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • According to the 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report, a significant boost in investment in the nation’s roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems is needed to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs.
  • AASHTO’s report found that based on an annual one percent increase in VMT annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges needs to increase 36 percent, from $88 billion to $120 billion, to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs, based on an annual one percent rate of vehicle travel growth. Investment in the nation’s public transit system needs to increase from $17 billion to $43 billion.
  • The Bottom Line Report found that if the national rate of vehicle travel increased by 1.4 percent per year, the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 64 percent to $144 billion. If vehicle travel grows by 1.6 percent annually the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 77 percent to $156 billion.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN WISCONSIN

The efficiency of Wisconsin’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses rely on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • 1,393,428 full-time jobs in Wisconsin in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing are completely dependent on the state’s transportation infrastructure network. These workers earn $54.8 billion in wages and contribute an estimated $10 billion in state and local income, corporate and unemployment insurance taxes and the federal payroll tax.
  • Annually, $264 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Wisconsin and another $236 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Wisconsin, mostly by truck.
  • Eighty-two percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Wisconsin are carried by trucks and another 14 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2015 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

Sources of information for this report include the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTS

TRIP Report:Deficient, Congested Roadways Cost Mississippi Drivers $2.25 Billion Annually – As Much As $1,879 Per Driver. Costs Will Rise And Transportation Woes Will Worsen Without Increased Funding

 Roads and bridges that are deficient, congested or lack desirable safety features cost Mississippi motorists a total of $2.25 billion statewide annually – as much as $1,879 in some areas – due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could relieve traffic congestion, improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, and support long-term economic growth in Mississippi, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national transportation organization.

The TRIP report, Mississippi Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Mississippi, 22 percent of major locally and state-maintained roads are in poor condition and another 42 percent are in mediocre or fair condition. Twenty percent of Mississippi’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The state’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year. And an average of 615 people were killed annually in crashes on Mississippi’s roads from 2010 to 2014.

Driving on deficient roads costs Mississippi motorists $2.25 billion per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculated the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Hattiesburg and Jackson urban areas. A breakdown of the

Miss 1“The TRIP report once again demonstrates the importance of investing in Mississippi’s transportation infrastructure,” said Scott Waller, executive vice president and COO of the Mississippi Economic Council. “It provides additional details regarding the enormous costs Mississippians already face, and the consequences of failing to act. More importantly, it amplifies the safety issues that exist as a result of poor road and bridge conditions and the importance of protecting our citizens.”

Traffic congestion in Mississippi is worsening, costing the state’s drivers $529 million annually in lost time and wasted fuel.

A total of 20 percent of Mississippi’s bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Thirteen percent of Mississippi’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional seven percent of the state’s bridges are functionally obsolete, which means they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.

Traffic crashes in Mississippi claimed the lives of 3,073 people between 2010 and 2014. Mississippi’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.54 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is significantly higher than the national average of 1.08. Mississippi’s overall traffic fatality rate is the fourth highest in the nation. The state’s rural roads have a traffic fatality rate that is nearly four and a half times higher than the rate on all other roads in the state (2.58 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel versus 0.58). TRIP estimates that roadway features may be a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.

Mississippi faces a significant shortfall in funds needed to maintain and improve its transportation system. The state currently faces a backlog of $6.6 billion dollars in funds needed to address needed repairs and improvements to Mississippi’s transportation system. A recent report by the Mississippi Economic Council (MEC) found that Mississippi will need $375 million annually in new revenue to address immediate transportation needs. Of the $375 million, $300 million is needed for improvements to the state-maintained system, and $75 million is needed to address the local system. The MEC report found that an additional $375 million in annual transportation investment would generate nearly 4,000 new direct and indirect jobs in the construction industry, additional state and local tax revenue of $15 million annually, and an overall annual economic benefit of more than $440 million.

The efficiency and condition of Mississippi’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $91 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Mississippi and another $104 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Mississippi, mostly by truck.

“These conditions are only going to get worse if greater funding is not made available at the local, state and federal levels,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without additional transportation funding Mississippi’s transportation system will become increasingly deteriorated and congested, the state will miss out on opportunities for economic growth and quality of life will suffer.”

MISSISSIPPI TRANSPORTATION BY THE NUMBERS:MS_TRIP_Infographics_March_2016

Meeting the State’s Need for Safe and Efficient Mobility
Ten Key Transportation Numbers in Mississippi

 

$2.25 billion

Driving on deficient roads costs Mississippi motorists a total of $2.25 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.
$1,061

$1,080

$1,879

 

 

TRIP has calculated the cost to the average motorist in Mississippi’s major urban areas in the form of additional VOC, congestion-related delays and traffic crashes. The average Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula area driver loses $1,061 annually, while each Hattiesburg area driver loses $1,080, and the average Jackson area motorist loses $1,879 annually.
 

 

$640

If the condition, efficiency and safety of Mississippi’s transportation system are not improved, the annual cost to the average Mississippi driver will increase by $640 in the form of additional costs due to increased wear and tear on vehicles, traffic crashes and delays due to traffic congestion.
 

4.5 X

The fatality rate on Mississippi’s non-interstate rural roads is nearly four an a half times that on all other roads in the state (2.58 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel vs. 0.58).
22%

19%

28%

44%

Statewide, 22 percent of Mississippi’s major roads are in poor condition. Nineteen percent of major roads in the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula urban area are in poor condition, while in the Hattiesburg urban area, 28 percent of major roads are in poor condition. Forty-four percent of major urban roads in Jackson are in poor condition.
$91 billion

$104 billion

Annually, $91 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Mississippi and another $104 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Mississippi, mostly by truck.
 

20 %

A total of 20 percent of Mississippi bridges are in need of repair, improvement or replacement. Thirteen percent of the state’s bridges are structurally deficient and seven percent are functionally obsolete.
19 hours

13 hours

38 hours

 

The average driver in the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula area loses 19 hours to congestion annually, while each driver in the Hattiesburg urban area loses 13 hours each year. The average Jackson area driver loses 38 hours annually as a result of traffic congestion.
 

$6.6 Billion

 

The state currently faces a backlog of $6.6 billion in funds need to address needed repairs and improvements to Mississippi’s roads, bridges and highways.
 

 

$375 Million

According to a recent Mississippi Economic Council (MEC) report, the state needs $375 million annually in new revenue to address immediate transportation needs. Of the $375 million, $300 million is needed for improvements to the state-maintained transportation system, and $75 million is needed to address the local system.

 

Seven years after the nation suffered a significant economic downturn, Mississippi’s economy continues to rebound. The rate of economic growth in Mississippi, which will be greatly impacted by the reliability and condition of the state’s transportation system, continues to have a significant impact on quality of life in the Magnolia State.

An efficient, safe and well-maintained transportation system provides economic and social benefits by affording individuals access to employment, housing, healthcare, education, goods and services, recreation, entertainment, family, and social activities. It also provides businesses with access to suppliers, markets and employees, all critical to a business’ level of productivity and ability to expand. Conversely, reduced accessibility and mobility – as a result of traffic congestion, a lack of adequate capacity, or deteriorated roads, highways, bridges and transit facilities – diminishes a region’s quality of life by reducing economic productivity and limiting opportunities for economic, health or social transactions and activities.

With an economy based largely on agriculture, manufacturing, education, tourism, energy and military installations, the quality of Mississippi’s transportation system will play a vital role in the state’s level of economic growth and in the quality of life in Mississippi.

In this report, TRIP looks at the top transportation issues faced in Mississippi as the state addresses its need to modernize and maintain its system of roads, highways, bridges and transit systems.

In 1987, Mississippi’s elected officials and business leaders set in motion the plans for a four-lane highway system that would connect Mississippians to all corners of the state and give Mississippi an economic edge. But, nearly three decades after those improvements were begun, Mississippi faces another critical juncture in enhancing its transportation system to improve quality of life for residents and support economic growth and improved access for businesses. A new report by the Mississippi Economic Council (MEC) found that the state faces a backlog of $6.6 billion dollars in funds needed to address needed repairs and improvements to Mississippi’s transportation system. Without an additional $375 million annually in state and local transportation investment, the MEC found that quality of life will deteriorate and Mississippi will miss out on opportunities for economic development and growth.

In December 2015, Congress passed, and the president signed into law, a long-term federal surface transportation program that includes modest funding increases and allows state and local governments to plan and finance projects with greater certainty through 2020. The Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act) provides approximately $305 billion for surface transportation with highway and transit funding slated to increase by approximately 15 and 18 percent, respectively, over the five-year duration of the program. While the modest funding increase and certainty provided by the FAST Act are a step in the right direction, the funding falls far short of the level needed to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs and fails to deliver a sustainable, long-term source of revenue for the federal Highway Trust Fund.

COST TO MISSISSIPPI MOTORISTS OF DEFICIENT ROADS

An inadequate transportation system costs Mississippi residents a total of $2.25 billion every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (VOC), congestion-related delays and traffic crashes.

  • TRIP estimates that Mississippi roadways that lack some desirable safety features, have inadequate capacity to meet travel demands or have poor pavement conditions cost the state’s residents approximately $2.25 billion annually in the form of additional vehicle operating costs (including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear), the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to traffic congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes.
  • TRIP has calculated the average cost to drivers in the state’s largest urban areas as a result of driving on roads that are deteriorated, congested and lack some desirable safety features. The chart below details the costs to drivers in the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Hattiesburg and Jackson urban areas as well as the statewide total.

Miss 2

  • A recent report by the Mississippi Economic Council (MEC) found that if the condition, efficiency and safety of Mississippi’s transportation system are not improved, the annual cost to the average Mississippi driver will increase by $640 in the form of additional costs due to increased wear and tear on vehicles, traffic crashes and delays due to traffic congestion.

POPULATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MISSISSIPPI

Population and economic growth in Mississippi have resulted in increased demands on the state’s major roads and highways, leading to increased wear and tear on the transportation system.

  • Mississippi’s population reached approximately three million residents in 2015, a five percent increase since 2000. Mississippi had approximately two million licensed drivers in 2013.
  • Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in Mississippi increased by 11 percent from 2000 to 2014 – from 35.5 billion VMT in 2000 to 39.5 billion VMT in 2014.
  • Vehicle miles of travel in Mississippi for the first ten months of 2015 were 3.3 percent higher than the first ten months of 2014. During the first ten months of 2015, U.S. vehicle miles of travel were 3.4 percent higher than the first ten months of 2014.
  • By 2030, vehicle travel in Mississippi is projected to increase by another 30 percent.
  • From 2000 to 2014, Mississippi’s gross domestic product, a measure of the state’s economic output, increased by 13 percent, when adjusted for inflation.

MISSISSIPPI ROAD CONDITIONS

A lack of adequate state and local funding has resulted in 22 percent of major roads and highways in Mississippi having pavement surfaces in poor condition, providing a rough ride and costing motorist in the form of additional vehicle operating costs.

  • Twenty-two percent of Mississippi’s major roads and highways have pavements in poor condition, while an additional 42 percent of the state’s major roads are rated in mediocre or fair condition and the remaining 36 percent are rated in good condition.
  • Roads rated in poor condition may show signs of deterioration, including rutting, cracks and potholes. In some cases, poor roads can be resurfaced, but often are too deteriorated and must be reconstructed.
  • Driving on rough roads costs Mississippi motorists a total of $1.1 billion annually in extra vehicle operating costs. Costs include accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.
  • The chart below details pavement conditions in the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Hattiesburg and Jackson urban areas.

Miss 3

MISSISSIPPI BRIDGE CONDITIONS

One-fifth of locally and state-maintained bridges in Mississippi show significant deterioration or do not meet current design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment. This includes all bridges that are 20 feet or more in length.

  • Thirteen percent of Mississippi’s bridges are structurally deficient. A bridge is structurally deficient if there is significant deterioration of the bridge deck, supports or other major components. Structurally deficient bridges are often posted for lower weight or closed to traffic, restricting or redirecting large vehicles, including commercial trucks and emergency services vehicles.
  • Seven percent of Mississippi’s bridges are functionally obsolete. Bridges that are functionally obsolete no longer meet current highway design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
  • Currently, approximately 4,000 state and local bridges are in need of repair or replacement. Of those bridges, 2,400 are posted for carrying only lower-weight vehicles, creating detours for school buses and emergency responders and interrupting the flow of commerce.
  • The chart below details the share of bridges in the state’s major urban areas that are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.

Miss 4

HIGHWAY SAFETY AND FATALITY RATES IN MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi’s rural traffic fatality rate is nearly four and a half times higher than the fatality rate on all other roads in the state. Improving safety features on Mississippi’s roads and highways would likely result in a decrease in the state’s traffic fatalities and serious crashes. It is estimated that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of all fatal and serious traffic crashes.

  • Between 2010 and 2014 a total of 3,073 people were killed in traffic crashes in Mississippi, an average of 615 fatalities per year.
  • Mississippi’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.54 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2014 is significantly higher than the national average of 1.08 and the fourth highest fatality rate in the nation.
  • The fatality rate on Mississippi’s rural non-Interstate roads was 2.58 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2014, nearly four and a half times higher than the 0.58 fatality rate on all other roads and highways in the state.
  • Roadway features that impact safety include the number of lanes, lane widths, lighting, lane markings, rumble strips, shoulders, guard rails, other shielding devices, median barriers and intersection design. The cost of serious crashes includes lost productivity, lost earnings, medical costs and emergency services.
  • Several factors are associated with vehicle crashes that result in fatalities, including driver behavior, vehicle characteristics and roadway features. TRIP estimates that roadway features are likely a contributing factor in approximately one-third of fatal traffic crashes.
  • Where appropriate, highway improvements can reduce traffic fatalities and crashes while improving traffic flow to help relieve congestion. Such improvements include removing or shielding obstacles; adding or improving medians; improved lighting; adding rumble strips, wider lanes, wider and paved shoulders; upgrading roads from two lanes to four lanes; and better road markings and traffic signals.
  • Investments in rural traffic safety have been found to result in significant reductions in serious traffic crashes. A 2012 report by the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) found that improvements completed recently by the Texas Department of Transportation that widened lanes, improved shoulders and made other safety improvements on 1,159 miles of rural state roadways resulted in 133 fewer fatalities on these roads in the first three years after the improvements were completed (as compared to the three years prior).   TTI estimates that the improvements on these roads are likely to save 880 lives over the next 20 years.

MISSISSIPPI TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Increasing levels of traffic congestion cause significant delays in Mississippi, particularly in its larger urban areas, choking commuting and commerce. Traffic congestion robs commuters of time and money and imposes increased costs on businesses, shippers and manufacturers, which are often passed along to the consumer.

  • According to the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the average Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula urban area driver loses $411 annually in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion. The average Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula urban area commuter loses 19 hours each year in traffic.
  • According to TTI, the average Hattiesburg urban area driver loses $298 annually in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion. The average Hattiesburg urban area commuter loses 13 hours each year in traffic.
  • According to TTI, the average driver in the Jackson urban area loses $878 each year in the cost of lost time and wasted fuel as a result of traffic congestion. The average Jackson urban area commuter wastes 38 hours each year stuck in traffic.
  • Increasing levels of congestion add significant costs to consumers, transportation companies, manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers and can reduce the attractiveness of a location to a company to consider expansion or even to locate a new facility. Congestion costs can also increase overall operating costs for trucking and shipping companies, leading to revenue losses, lower pay for drivers and employees, and higher consumer costs.

MISSISSIPPI’S TRANSPORTATION FUNDING SHORTFALL

A new report by the MEC found the state faces a critical juncture in the need to enhance its transportation system to improve quality of life for residents and support growth and ease of access for businesses. However, the state faces a significant shortfall in needed transportation funds to make critical improvements to its roads and bridges.

  • The state currently faces a backlog of $6.6 billion dollars in funds needed to address needed repairs and improvements to Mississippi’s transportation system.
  • The MEC report found that Mississippi will need $375 million annually in new revenue to address immediate transportation needs. Of the $375 million, $300 million is needed for improvements to the state-maintained system, and $75 million is needed to address the local system.
  • The MEC report found that an additional $375 million in annual transportation investment would generate nearly 4,000 new direct and indirect jobs in the construction industry, additional state and local tax revenue of $15 million annually, and an overall annual economic benefit of more than $440 million.
  • Improving the conditions of Mississippi’s transportation system could save the average driver $534 annually over the next ten years in the cost of driving on roads that are deteriorated, congested and that lack some safety features.
  • Without an additional investment in Mississippi’s transportation system, the state is projected to lose 10,161 jobs annually in all sectors over the next ten years. However, with adequate transportation investment, Mississippi would add 7,673 jobs annually across all sectors.

TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MISSISSIPPI

The efficiency of Mississippi’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Businesses rely on an efficient and dependable transportation system to move products and services. A key component in business efficiency and success is the level and ease of access to customers, markets, materials and workers.

  • Annually, $91 billion in goods are shipped from sites in Mississippi and another $104 billion in goods are shipped to sites in Mississippi, mostly by truck.
  • Seventy-seven percent of the goods shipped annually from sites in Mississippi are carried by trucks and another four percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
  • Businesses have responded to improved communications and greater competition by moving from a push-style distribution system, which relies on low-cost movement of bulk commodities and large-scale warehousing, to a pull-style distribution system, which relies on smaller, more strategic and time-sensitive movement of goods.
  • Increasingly, companies are looking at the quality of a region’s transportation system when deciding where to re-locate or expand. Regions with congested or poorly maintained roads may see businesses relocate to areas with a smoother, more efficient and more modern transportation system.
  • Highway accessibility was ranked the number two site selection factor behind only the availability of skilled labor in a 2013 survey of corporate executives by Area Development Magazine.
  • The Federal Highway Administration estimates that each dollar spent on road, highway and bridge improvements results in an average benefit of $5.20 in the form of reduced vehicle maintenance costs, reduced delays, reduced fuel consumption, improved safety, reduced road and bridge maintenance costs and reduced emissions as a result of improved traffic flow.

FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION FUNDING IN MISSISSIPPI

Investment in Mississippi’s roads, highways and bridges is funded by local, state and federal governments. The recently approved five-year federal surface transportation program includes modest funding increases and provides states with greater funding certainty, but falls far short of providing the level of funding needed to meet the nation’s highway and transit needs. The bill does not include a long-term and sustainable revenue source.

  • From 2009 to 2013, the federal government provided $1.24 for road improvements in Mississippi for every dollar the state paid in federal motor fuel fees.
  • According to the 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report, a significant boost in investment in the nation’s roads, highways, bridges and public transit systems is needed to improve their condition and to meet the nation’s transportation needs.
  • AASHTO’s report found that based on an annual one percent increase in VMT annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges needs to increase 36 percent, from $88 billion to $120 billion, to improve conditions and meet the nation’s mobility needs. Investment in the nation’s public transit system needs to increase from $17 billion to $43 billion.
  • The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom Line Report found that if the national rate of vehicle travel increased by 1.4 percent per year, the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 64 percent to $144 billion. If vehicle travel grows by 1.6 percent annually the needed annual investment in the nation’s roads, highways and bridges would need to increase by 77 percent to $156 billion.

Sources of information for this report include the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT), the Mississippi Economic Council (MEC), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), the U.S. Census Bureau, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

 

 

Caterpillar to End Production of On-Highway Vocational Trucks

Caterpillar Inc.  recently  announced it will discontinue production of its on-highway vocational trucks. Based on the current business climate in the truck industry and a thorough evaluation of the business, the company decided it would withdraw from this market. This is also in line with the company’s ongoing restructuring to align its businesses with existing conditions. As a result of this action, the company will cease taking new orders for vocational trucks, although Caterpillar remains committed to existing truck customers and will support the existing trucks currently on the road.

Unknown-1Caterpillar launched its first vocational truck in the North American market in 2011, working with Navistar on the products’ design and build. Last year, the company announced its intention to begin independently designing and manufacturing its vocational truck products at the Caterpillar plant in Victoria, Texas.

“Remaining a viable competitor in this market would require significant additional investment to develop and launch a complete portfolio of trucks, and upon an updated review, we determined there was not a sufficient market opportunity to justify the investment,” said Ramin Younessi, vice president with responsibility for Caterpillar’s Industrial Power UnknownSystems Division. “We have not yet started truck production in Victoria, and this decision allows us to exit this business before the transition occurs.”

This announcement will impact approximately 70 positions. The reductions will begin in March and will take place over a period of time.