ASCE State-By-State Infrastructure Assessment

The following is the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 2009 Report Card assessment of how each state’s infrastructure measures up. How well is your state doing?

Alabama
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Bridges

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 26% of Alabama’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· Alabama has no dam safety program.
· Alabama’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $1.69 billion over the next 20 years.
· Alabama ranked 15th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 24th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Alabama’s ports handled 78 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 13th in the nation.
· Alabama reported an unmet need of $45 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 16% of Alabama’s major roads have pavements in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on Alabama’s highways increased 45 percent from 1990 to 2007.
· 52% of Alabama’s urban highways are considered congested.
· Alabama has $3 billion in deferred transportation maintenance.
· Alabama has $3.51 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Alaska
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Energy
3. Bridges

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 35% of Alaska’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 18 high hazard dams in Alaska. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 22 of Alaska’s 82 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 39% of high hazard dams in Alaska have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Alaska’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $682 million over the next 20 years.
· Alaska ranked 48th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 42nd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Alaska’s ports handled 61 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 16th in the nation.
· Alaska reported an unmet need of $2.6 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 46% of Alaska’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
·Vehicle travel on Alaska’s highways increased 30 percent from 1990 to 2007.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Arizona
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Drinking Water
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 12% of Arizona’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 96 high hazard dams in Arizona. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 43 of Arizona’s 248 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 29% of high hazard dams in Arizona have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Arizona’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $9.12 billion over the next 20 years.
· Arizona ranked 33rd in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 27th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Arizona reported an unmet need of $8.6 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 21% of Arizona’s roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 41% of Arizona’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Arizona’s highways increased by 78% from 1990 to 2007.
· Arizona has $4.57 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Arkansas
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 25% of Arkansas’ bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 103 high hazard dams in Arkansas. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 21 of Arkansas’ 406 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
·5% of high hazard dams in Arkansas have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of li
fe and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Arkansas’ drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $3.54 billion over the next 20 years.
· Arkansas ranked 14th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 34th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Arkansas’ ports handled 13 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 33rd in the nation.
· Arkansas reported an unmet need of $4.8 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 32% of Arkansas’ major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 39% of Arkansas’ major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Arkansas’ highways increased by 58% from 1990 to 2007.
· Arkansas has a $160 million backlog in highway maintenance needs.
· Arkansas has $408 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

California
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Drinking Water
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 69 of California’s 1,247 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 59% of high hazard dams in California have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· California’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $27.87 billion over the next 20 years.
· California ranked 11th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 1st in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· California’s ports handled 216 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 3rd in the nation.
· California reported an unmet need of $1.7 billion for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 66% of California’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 68% of California’s urban interstates are considered congested.
· Vehicle travel on California’s highways increased by 27% from 1990 to 2007.
· California spends $2 billion less each year on highway maintenance and rehabilitation than is needed.
· California has $18.17 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.
· 30% of California’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 687 high hazard dams in California. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003. National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Other Resources:
California Report Card

Colorado
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Drinking Water
3. Bridges

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 18% of Colorado’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 352 high hazard dams in Colorado. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 9 of Colorado’s 1,935 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 2% of high hazard dams in Colorado have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Colorado’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $5.32 billion over the next 20 years.
· Colorado ranked 34th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 33rd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Colorado reported an unmet need of $440 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 32% of Colorado’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 31% of Colorado’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Colorado’s highways increased by 79% from 1990 to 2007.
· Colorado has $2.13 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.
· Colorado’s 2008 budget spent $66 million less on non-transportation infrastructure projects than state agenicies believed they needed.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.

Other Resources:
Colorado Report Card

Connecticut
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Bridges
2. Roads
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 35% of Connecticut’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 226 high hazard dams in Connecticut. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 3 of Connecticut’s 1,187 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 28% of high hazard dams in Con
necticut have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Connecticut’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $653 million over the next 20 years.
· Connecticut ranked 38th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 22nd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Connecticut’s ports handled 20 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 30th in the nation.
· Connecticut reported an unmet need of $81 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 47% of Connecticut’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 58% of Connecticut’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Connecticut’s highways increased by 22% from 1990 to 2007.
· Connecticut has $2.6 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Delaware
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 18% of Delaware’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 9 high hazard dams in Delaware. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 6 of Delaware’s 37 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 11% of high hazard dams in Delaware have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Delaware’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $241 million over the next 20 years.
· Delaware ranked 40th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 41st in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Delaware’s ports handled 41 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 22nd in the nation.
· Delaware reported an unmet need of $15.5 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 27% of Delaware’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 34% of Delaware’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Delaware’s major highways increased by 45% from 1990 to 2007.
· Delaware has $134 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Florida
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Mass Transit
3. Drinking Water

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 18% of Florida’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 72 high hazard dams in Florida. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· Florida’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $15.04 billion over the next 20 years.
· Florida ranked 21st in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 17th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Florida’s ports handled 133 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 4th in the nation.
· Florida reported an unmet need of $8.3 billion for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 13% of Florida’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 47% of Florida’s major urban highways are considered congested.
· Vehicle travel on Florida’s highways increased 87% from 1990 to 2007.
· Florida has $9.05 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Other Resources:
Florida Report Card

Georgia
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Drinking Water
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 21% of Georgia’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 457 high hazard dams in Georgia. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 147 of Georgia’s 3,881 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 97% of high hazard dams in Georgia have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Georgia’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $9.02 billion over the next 20 years.
· Georgia ranked 26th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 16th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Georgia’s ports handled 33 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 25th in the nation.
· Georgia reported an unmet need of $6.2 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 41% of Georgia’s major urba
n highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Georgia’s highways increased 56% from 1990 to 2007.
· Georgia has $2.35 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Hawaii
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Mass Transit
2. Roads
3. Schools

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 44% of Hawaii’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 97 high hazard dams in Hawaii. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 46 of Hawaii’s 138 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 35% of high hazard dams in Hawaii have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Hawaii’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $813 million over the next 20 years.
· Hawaii ranked 49th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 47th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Hawaii’s ports handled 31 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 26th in the nation.
· Hawaii reported an unmet need of $35 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 71% of Hawaii’s interstate pavements are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 45% of Hawaii’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Hawaii’s highways increased by 28% from 1990 to 2007.
· Hawaii has a $187 million backlog of deferred road maintenance.
· Hawaii has $1.97 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Idaho
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 20% of Idaho’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 107 high hazard dams in Idaho. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 9 of Idaho’s 569 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 13% of high hazard dams in Idaho have no have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Idaho’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $727 million over the next 20 years.
· Idaho ranked 41st in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 43rd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Idaho’s ports handled 1 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 39th in the nation.
· Idaho reported an unmet need of $7.7 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 25% of Idaho’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 40% of Idaho’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Idaho’s highways increased 60% from 1990 to 2007.
· Idaho has $444 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Illinois
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 18% of Illinois’ bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 187 high hazard dams in Illinois. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 9% of high hazard dams in Illinois have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Illinois’ drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $13.5 billion over the next 20 years.
· Illinois ranked 7th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 6th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Illinois’ ports handled 117 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 8th in the nation.
· Illinois reported an unmet need of $4.9 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 34% of Illinois’ major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 43% of Illinois’ major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Illinois’ highways increased 29% from 1990 to 2007.
· Illinois has $13.41 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation
Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Indiana
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 25% of Indiana’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 240 high hazard dams in Indiana. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 538 of Indiana’s 1,088 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 92% of high hazard dams in Indiana have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Indiana’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $4.03 billion over the next 20 years.
· Indiana ranked 9th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 9th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Indiana’s ports handled 71 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 15th in the nation.
· Indiana reported an unmet need of $429 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 29% of Indiana’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on Indiana’s highways increased 33% from 1990 to 2007.
· Indiana has $5.86 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Iowa
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Levees

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 27% of Iowa’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 83 high hazard dams in Iowa. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 31 of Iowa’s 3,325 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 95% of high hazard dams in Iowa have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Iowa’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $3.5 billion over the next 20 years.
· Iowa ranked 35th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 30th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Iowa’s ports handled 13 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 32nd in the nation.
· Iowa reported an unmet need of $840,000 for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 41% of Iowa’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 38% of Iowa’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Iowa’s highways increased 57% from 1990 to 2004 while lane miles were not increased at all.
· Iowa faces a $27.7 billion transportation funding shortage over the next two decades.
· Iowa has $953 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004

Kansas
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Mass Transit
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 21% of Kansas’ bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 198 high hazard dams in Kansas. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 18 of Kansas’ 6,052 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 43% of high hazard dams in Kansas have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Kansas’ drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $1.93 billion over the next 20 years.
· Kansas ranked 18th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 25th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Kansas’ ports handled 2 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 38th in the nation. · Kansas reported an unmet need of $28.8 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 15% of Kansas’ major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 25% of Kansas’ major urban highways are considered congested during peak times.
· Vehicle travel on Kansas’ highways increased 41% from 1990 to 2007.
· Kansas has $2.06 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Kentucky
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 34% of Kentucky’s bridges are struc
turally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 178 high hazard dams in Kentucky. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 89 of Kentucky’s 1,066 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 96% of high hazard dams in Kentucky have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Kentucky’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $2.81 billion over the next 20 years.
· Kentucky ranked 24th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 21st in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Kentucky’s ports handled 112 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 9th in the nation.
· Kentucky reported an unmet need of $8.9 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 19% of Kentucky’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 57% of Kentucky’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Kentucky’s highways increased 41% from 1990 to 2007.
· Kentucky has $2.82 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Louisiana
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Schools
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 30% of Louisiana’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 29 high hazard dams in Louisiana. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 20 of Louisiana’s 540 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 28% of high hazard dams in Louisiana have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam
· Louisiana’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $4.11 billion over the next 20 years.
· Louisiana ranked 1st in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 15th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Louisiana’s ports handled 456 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 2nd in the nation.
· Louisiana reported an unmet need of $125 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 44% of Louisiana’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 43% of Louisiana’s major urban highways are considered congested.
· Vehicle travel on Louisiana’s highways increased 20% from 1990 to 2007.
· Louisiana has $3.33 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Maine
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Schools

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 36% of Maine’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 25 high hazard dams in Maine. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 13 of Maine’s 831 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 8% of high hazard dams in Maine have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Maine’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $832 million over the next 20 years.
· Maine ranked 44th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 40th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Maine’s ports handled 27 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 29th in the nation.
· Maine reported an unmet need of $12.5 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 29% of Maine’s major roads have pavements in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on Maine’s highways increased by 27 percent from 1990 to 2007.
· Maine has $851 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Other Resources:
Maine Report Card

Maryland
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Mass Transit
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts
· 29% of Maryland’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 68 high hazard dams in Maryland. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 37 of Maryland’s 382 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 12% of high hazard dams in Maryland have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and ev
acuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Maryland’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $3.96 billion over the next 20 years.
· Maryland ranked 36th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 35th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Maryland’s ports handled 54 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 18th in the nation.
· Maryland reported an unmet need of $112 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 44% of Maryland’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 55% of Maryland’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Maryland’s Interstates increased 52% from 1990 to 2004 while lane miles increased only 21%.
· Maryland has $5.44 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Massachusetts
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts
· 56% of Massachusetts’ bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 303 high hazard dams in Massachusetts. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 246 of Massachusetts’ 1,630 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 18% of high hazard dams in Massachusetts have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Massachusetts’ drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $8.56 billion over the next 20 years.
· Massachusetts ranked 19th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 11th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Massachusetts’ ports handled 10 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 35th in the nation.
· Massachusetts reported an unmet need of $12.5 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 41% of Massachusetts’ major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 38% of Massaachusetts’ major urban highways are considered congested.
· Vehicle travel on Massachusetts’ highways increased 41% from 1990 to 2007.
· Massachusetts needs to come up with an additional $15 – $19 billion over the next two decades for maintenance on existing transportation assets.
· Massachusetts has $3.16 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Michigan
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Bridges

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 30% of Michigan’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 84 high hazard dams in Michigan. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 27 of Michigan’s 1,034 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 5% of high hazard dams in Michigan have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Michigan’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $11.31 billion over the next 20 years.
· Michigan ranked 3rd in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 7th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Michigan’s ports handled 74 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 14th in the nation.
· Michigan reported an unmet need of $63.2 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 37% of Michigan’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 39% of Michigan’s major urban highways are considered congested.
· Vehicle travel on Michigan’s highways increased 29% from 1990 to 2007.
· Michigan has $6.02 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Minnesota
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 13% of Minnesota’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 23 high hazard dams in Minnesota. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 72 of Minnesota’s 1,128 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· Minnesota’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $5.46 billion over the next 20 years.
· Minnesota ranked 27th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 23rd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Minnesota’s ports handled 40 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005
, ranking it 23rd in the nation.
· Minnesota reported an unmet need of $21.7 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 32% of Minnesota’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 76% of Minnesota’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Minnesota’s highways increased 47% from 1990 to 2007.
· Minnesota has $2.73 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2008.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Mississippi
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Schools

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 25% of Mississippi’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 265 high hazard dams in Mississippi. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 35 of Mississippi’s 3,717 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 73% of high hazard dams in Mississippi have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Mississippi’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $1.65 billion over the next 20 years.
· Mississippi ranked 4th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 31st in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Mississippi’s ports handled 44 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 21st in the nation.
· Mississippi reported an unmet need of $9.2 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 40% of Mississippi’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 28% of Mississippi’s major urban highways.
· Vehicle travel on Mississippi’s highways increased by 78 percent from 1990 to 2007.
· Mississippi has $993 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Missouri
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Bridges

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 33% of Missouri’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 462 high hazard dams in Missouri. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 38 of Missouri’s 664 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 95% of high hazard dams in Missouri have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Missouri’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $5.96 billion over the next 20 years.
· Missouri ranked 20th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 18th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Missouri’s ports handled 28 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 27th in the nation.
· Missouri reported an unmet need of $6.8 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 34% of Missouri’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 44% of Missouri’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Missouri’s highways increased by 36 percent from 1990 to 2007.
· Missouri has $4.84 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Montana
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Drinking Water

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 20% of Montana’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 102 high hazard dams in Montana. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 25 of Montana’s 2,884 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 9% of high hazard dams in Montana have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Montana’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $789 million over the next 20 years.
· Montana ranked 39th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 45th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Montana reported an unmet need of $248 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 11% of Montana’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on Montana’s highways increased 36% from 1990 to 2007.
· Montana has $540 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Nebraska
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Bridges

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 23% of Nebraska’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 124 high hazard dams in Nebraska. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 6% of high hazard dams in Nebraska have no have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Nebraska’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $1.35 billion over the next 20 years.
· Nebraska ranked 37th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 38th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Nebraska reported an unmet need of $14.9 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 24% of Nebraska’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 30% of Nebraska’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Nebraska’s highways increased 39% from 1990 to 2007.
· Nebraska state transportation managers ascertain that the level of funding necessary to maintain the current system is $170 million.
· Nebraska has $1.31 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Nevada
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Drinking Water

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 16% of Nevada’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 165 high hazard dams in Nevada. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 27 of Nevada’s 744 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 35% of high hazard dams in Nevada have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Nevada’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $912 million over the next 20 years.
· Nevada ranked 42nd in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 39th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Nevada reported an unmet need of $8 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 13% of Nevada’s roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 59% of Nevada’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Nevada’s highways increased 117% from 1990 to 2007.
· Nevada’s transportation department has identified 10 mega projects costing an estimated $4.8 billion that need to be completed by 2015 to avoid gridlock in urban areas.
· Nevada has $246 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

New Hampshire
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Schools

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 36% of New Hampshire’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 106 high hazard dams in New Hampshire. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 57 of New Hampshire’s 3,073 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 8% of high hazard dams in New Hampshire have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· New Hampshire’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $596 million over the next 20 years.
· New Hampshire ranked 43rd in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 28th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· New Hampshire’s ports handled 5 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 36th in the nation.
· New Hampshire reported an unmet need of $460,000 for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 27% of New Hampshire’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 51% of New Hampshire’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· Vehicle travel on New Hampshire’s highways increased 41% from 1990 to 2007.
· New Hampshire has $570 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

New Jersey
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 36% of New Jersey’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 213 high hazard dams in New Jersey. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 315 of New Jersey’s 1,717 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 2% of high hazard dams in New Jersey have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· New Jersey’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $6.92 billion over the next 20 years.
· New Jersey ranked 12th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 8th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· New Jersey’s ports handled 127 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 5th in the nation.
· New Jersey reported an unmet need of $210 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 78% of New Jersey’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 64% of New Jersey’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on New Jersey’s highways increased 29% from 1990 to 2007.
· New Jersey transportation systems have a deferred maintenance backlog of $13 billion.
· New Jersey has $9.15 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Other Resources:
New Jersey Report Card

New Mexico
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Drinking Water
2. Roads
3. Schools

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 19% of New Mexico’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 181 high hazard dams in New Mexico. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 167 of New Mexico’s 398 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 93% of high hazard dams in New Mexico have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· New Mexico’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $922 million over the next 20 years.
· New Mexico ranked 10th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 44th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· New Mexico reported an unmet need of $15.1 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 22% of New Mexico’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 19% of New Mexico’s major urban roads are congested.
· Vehicle travel on New Mexico’s highways increased 66% from 1990 to 2007.
· New Mexico has $160 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

New York
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Bridges
2. Roads
3. Mass Transit


Key Infrastructure Facts

· 42% of New York’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 391 high hazard dams in New York. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 48 of New York’s 5,089 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 36% of high hazard dams in New York have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· New York’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $14.81 billion over the next 20 years.
· New York ranked 6th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 2nd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· New York’s ports handled 96 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 11th in the nation.
· New York reported an unmet need of $707 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 46% of New York’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 45% of New York’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on New York’s highways increased 41% from 1990 to 2007.
· New York has $21.82 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

North Carolina
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Wastewater


Key Infrastructure Facts

· 30% of North Carolina’s bridg
es are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 1,153 high hazard dams in North Carolina. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 215 of North Carolina’s 4,765 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 79% of high hazard dams in North Carolina have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· North Carolina’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $10.98 billion over the next 20 years.
· North Carolina ranked 28th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 12th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· North Carolina’s ports handled 14 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 31st in the nation.
· North Carolina reported an unmet need of $1.2 billion for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 27% of North Carolina’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 54% of North Carolina’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on North Carolina’s highways increased 65% from 1990 to 2007.
· North Carolina has $5.05 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Other Resources:
North Carolina Report Card

North Dakota
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Bridges


Key Infrastructure Facts

· 22% of North Dakota’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 29 high hazard dams in North Dakota. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 18 of North Dakota’s 1,150 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 45% of high hazard dams in North Dakota have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· North Dakota’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $607 million over the next 20 years.
· North Dakota ranked 13th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 50th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· North Dakota reported an unmet need of $3.7 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 25% of North Dakota’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on North Dakota’s highways increased 47% from 1990 to 2007.
· North Dakota has $50 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Ohio
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Drinking Water

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 27% of Ohio’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 375 high hazard dams in Ohio. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 524 of Ohio’s 1,597 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 57% of high hazard dams in Ohio have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Ohio’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $9.68 billion over the next 20 years.
· Ohio ranked 5th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 3rd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Ohio’s ports handled 124 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 6th in the nation. · Ohio reported an unmet need of $3.3 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 25% of Ohio’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 45% of Ohio’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Ohio’s highways increased 27% from 1990 to 2007.
· Ohio has $11.16 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Oklahoma
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Drinking Water


Key Infrastructure Facts

· 32% of Oklahoma’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 286 high hazard dams in Oklahoma. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 150 of Oklahoma’s 4,427 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 10% of high hazard dams in Oklahoma have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and eva
cuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Oklahoma’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $4.80 billion over the next 20 years.
· Oklahoma ranked 25th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 29th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Oklahoma’s ports handled 4 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 37th in the nation.
· Oklahoma reported an unmet need of $1.2 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 40% of Oklahoma’s major roads are rated in poor or mediocre condition.
· 29% of Oklahoma’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Oklahoma’s highways increased by 44% from 1990 to 2007.
· Oklahoma has a $230 million deferred maintenance bill for state highways.
· Oklahoma has $848 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2008.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Oregon
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Schools


Key Infrastructure Facts

· 25% of Oregon’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 122 high hazard dams in Oregon. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 8 of Oregon’s 1,204 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 32% of high hazard dams in Oregon have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Oregon’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $4.27 billion over the next 20 years.
· Oregon ranked 32nd in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 26th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Oregon’s ports handled 36 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 24th in the nation.
· Oregon reported an unmet need of $123,000 for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 18% of Oregon’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 42% of Oregon’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Oregon’s highways increased 41% from 1990 to 2007.
· Oregon has $2.88 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Pennsylvania
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Bridges
2. Roads
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 50% of Pennsylvania’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 781 high hazard dams in Pennsylvania. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 529 of Pennsylvania’s 3,196 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 9% of high hazard dams in Pennsylvania have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Pennsylvania’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $10.99 billion over the next 20 years.
· Pennsylvania ranked 16th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 5th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Pennsylvania’s ports handled 108 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 10th in the nation.
· Pennsylvania reported an unmet need of $43.2 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 44% of Pennsylvania’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 34% of Pennsylvania’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Pennsylvania’s highways increased 27% from 1990 to 2007.
· Pennsylvania has $3 billion in backlogged road repairs.
· Pennsylvania has $7.18 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Other Resources:
Pennsylvania’s Report Card

Rhode Island
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Bridges
2. Drinking Water
3. Roads

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 57% of Rhode Island’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 95 high hazard dams in Rhode Island. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 2 of Rhode Island’s 643 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 98% of high hazard dams in Rhode Island have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be tak
en including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Rhode Island’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $403 million over the next 20 years.
· Rhode Island ranked 45th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 37th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Rhode Island’s ports handled 11 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 34th in the nation.
· Rhode Island reported an unmet need of $8.7 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 68% of Rhode Island’s roads were rated in poor or mediocre condition.
· 37% of Rhode Island’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Rhode Island’s highways increased by 23 percent from 1990 to 2007.
· Rhode Island has $1.16 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

South Dakota
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Drinking Water

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 25% of South Dakota’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 47 high hazard dams in South Dakota. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 67 of South Dakota’s 2,349 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 34% of high hazard dams in South Dakota have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· South Dakota’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $990 million over the next 20 years.
· South Dakota ranked 50th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 49th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· South Dakota reported an unmet need of $7.2 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 29% of South Dakota’s major roads are rated in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on South Dakota’s highways increased 29% from 1990 to 2007.
· South Dakota’s transportation system has $756 million in deferred-maintenance and construction needs.
· South Dakota has $67 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Grading the States ’08: A Management Report Card, Government Performance Project, Governing Magazine.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Tennessee
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Wastewater
3. Schools

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 21% of Tennessee’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 148 high hazard dams in Tennessee. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 6 of Tennessee’s 658 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· Tennessee’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $2.77 billion over the next 20 years.
· Tennessee ranked 8th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 14th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Tennessee’s ports handled 48 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 19th in the nation.
· Tennessee reported an unmet need of $1.1 billion for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 17% of Tennessee’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 43% of Tennesee’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Tennessee’s highways increased by 52 percent from 1990 to 2007.
· Tennessee has $1.04 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Texas
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Drinking Water
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 22% of Texas’ bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 888 high hazard dams in Texas. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 103 of Texas’ 7,478 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 84% of high hazard dams in Texas have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Texas’ drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $28.17 billion over the next 20 years.
· Texas ranked 2nd in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 4th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Texas’ ports handled 487 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 1st in the nation. · Texas reported an unmet need of $31.2 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 32% of Texas’ major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 47% of Texas’ major urban highways are
congested.
· Vehicle travel on Texas’ highways increased 50% from 1990 to 2007.
· Texas has $5.64 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Other Resources:
Texas Report Card

Utah
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Drinking Water
3. Bridges

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 18% of Utah’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 192 high hazard dams in Utah. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 84 of Utah’s 605 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 3% of high hazard dams in Utah have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Utah’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $707 million over the next 20 years.
· Utah ranked 30th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 36th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Utah reported an unmet need of $127 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 29% of Utah’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 40% of Utah’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Utah’s highways increased 83% from 1990 to 2007.
· Utah has $563 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Vermont
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Wastewater

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 39% of Vermont’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 57 high hazard dams in Vermont. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 6 of Vermont’s 572 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 75% of high hazard dams in Vermont have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Vermont’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $395 million over the next 20 years.
· Vermont ranked 47th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 46th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Vermont reported an unmet need of $15.4 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 40% of Vermont’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on Vermont’s highways increased 32% from 1990 to 2007.
· Vermont has $167 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Virginia
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 28% of Virginia’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 143 high hazard dams in Virginia. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 125 of Virginia’s 1,678 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 15% of high hazard dams in Virginia have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Virginia’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $2.87 billion over the next 20 years.
· Virginia ranked 29th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 20th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Virginia’s ports handled 60 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 17th in the nation.
· Virginia reported an unmet need of $1 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 23% of Virginia’s roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 33% of Virginia’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Virginia’s highways increased by 36% from 1990 to 2007.
· Virginia has $4.74 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.
< br />Washington
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Bridges
3. Mass Transit

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 29% of Washington’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 145 high hazard dams in Washington. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 29 of Washington’s 950 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 17% of high hazard dams in Washington have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Washington’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $6.67 billion over the next 20 years.
· Washington ranked 23rd in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 13th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Washington’s ports handled 122 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 7th in the nation.
· Washington reported an unmet need of $60.6 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 33% of Washington’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 27% of Washington’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Washington’s highways increased 27% from 1990 to 2007.
· Washington has $3.75 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

West Virginia
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Bridges
2. Roads
3. Drinking Water

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 39% of West Virginia’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 245 high hazard dams in West Virginia. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 30 of West Virginia’s 360 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 8% of high hazard dams in West Virginia have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· West Virginia’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $862 million over the next 20 years.
· West Virginia ranked 31st in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 32nd in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· West Virginia’s ports handled 79 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 12th in the nation.
· West Virginia reported an unmet need of $15.8 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 37% of West Virginia’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· Vehicle travel on West Virginia’s highways increased 33% from 1990 to 2007.
· West Virginia has $2.52 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Wisconsin
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Roads
2. Drinking Water
3. Schools


Key Infrastructure Facts

· 16% of Wisconsin’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 189 high hazard dams in Wisconsin. A high hazard dam is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 13 of Wisconsin’s 3,653 dams are in need of rehabilitation to meet applicable state dam safety standards.
· 55% of high hazard dams in Wisconsin have no emergency action plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken including roles, responsibilities and procedures for surveillance, notification and evacuation to reduce the potential for loss of life and property damage in an area affected by a failure or mis-operation of a dam.
· Wisconsin’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $5.94 billion over the next 20 years.
· Wisconsin ranked 17th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 10th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Wisconsin’s ports handled 44 million tons of waterborne traffic in 2005, ranking it 20th in the nation.
· Wisconsin reported an unmet need of $28.5 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 30% of Wisconsin’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition.
· 25% of Wisconsin’s major urban highways are congested.
· Vehicle travel on Wisconsin’s highways increased by 34% from 1990 to 2007.
· Wisconsin has $3.66 billion in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
The U.S. Waterway System – Transportation Facts, Navigation Data Center, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, February 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Wyoming
Top Three Infrastructure Concerns:

1. Drinking Water
2. Wastewater
3. Roads

Key Infrastructure Facts

· 23% of Wyoming’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
· There are 79 high hazard dams in Wyoming. A high hazard da
m is defined as a dam whose failure would cause a loss of life and significant property damage.
· 53% of high hazard dams in Wyoming have no Emergency Action Plan (EAP). An EAP is a predetermined plan of action to be taken to reduce the potential for property damage and loss of life in an area affected by a dam break or excessive spillway.
· Wyoming’s drinking water infrastructure needs an investment of $298 million over the next 20 years.
· Wyoming ranked 46th in the quantity of hazardous waste produced and 48th in the total number of hazardous waste producers.
· Wyoming reported an unmet need of $1 million for its state public outdoor recreation facilities and parkland acquisition.
· 18% of Wyoming’s major roads are in poor or mediocre condition
· Vehicle travel on Ohio’s highways increased 61% from 1990 to 2007.
· Wyoming has $188 million in wastewater infrastructure needs.

Sources

*Survey of the state’s ASCE members conducted in September 2009.
Deficient Bridge Report, Federal Highway Administration, 2008.
National Inventory of Dams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008.
Drinking Water Needs Survey and Assessment, Environmental Protection Agency, 2003.
National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report, Environmental Protection Agency, 2007.
2007 Annual Report, Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program, National Park Service.
TRIP Fact Sheet, March 2009.
Clean Water Needs Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, 2004.

Greg Sitek

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