Daily Dirt

Concrete Pavement Highways Expected to Grow

Department of Transportation (DOT) staff in more than 50 percent of the states expect concrete’s share of paving to increase during the next five years, according to a recent market research survey by the Portland Cement Association (PCA).

Respondents cited concrete’s life-cycle cost advantages and lower maintenance levels are reasons to expect an increase in its use. Fifty-four percent of states considered life-cycle cost an important driver. Additionally, concrete pavements were lauded for their performance on high traffic roadways, with 30 percent of respondents citing it as the reason they select concrete over asphalt for paving state roadways.

“After lifecycle and performance, concrete’s initial cost was an important factor,” said Wayne Adaska, PCA’s director of pavements. “For example, the number of DOTs that consider concrete to have a higher initial cost than asphalt decreased by 22 percent compared to a similar survey conducted in 2005.”

The survey also measured the impact of sustainability or “green” issues on pavement choice. While the majority of respondents considered sustainability to have only a minor impact on material selection, 50 percent of state DOTs anticipate the influence of sustainable development on pavement material selection to grow within the next five years. Concrete’s durability and recyclability will make it an attractive material when considering sustainability, according to survey respondents.

The survey was completed in 2008 by employees from all 50 state DOTs to gain an understanding of their current opinions, attitudes, insides and direction relative to the use of concrete and cement-based systems in pavement.

Governor Paterson Breaks Ground On First Stimulus Project In New York

New York Governor David A. Paterson (D) today broke ground on the $14.9 million Delaware Avenue reconstruction project in Albany County, the first American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) construction contract awarded in New York. The project was certified by the Governor in March and will reconstruct 1.6 miles of Delaware Avenue between Madison Avenue and the bridge over the New York State Thruway that links Albany to the Town of Delmar. Callanan Industries Inc. of Albany was awarded the contract for the project, which will involve 40 construction workers. Construction begins Monday, and will include curb, drainage, sidewalk, and utility work.

“Today we see federal economic recovery funds at work in New York State, creating jobs and making critical improvements to the conditions of our roads and bridges, a mere 10 weeks since President Obama signed the legislation,” Governor Paterson said. “A crew of 40 will be working on this Delaware Avenue project, and more than 4,600 jobs are expected to be created with this most recent certification. This funding is putting people to work in heavy construction while providing a safer, smoother ride locally and across our great State.”

New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) Executive Deputy Commissioner Stanley Gee said, “Delaware Avenue provides a critical link between Albany and Bethlehem, and this reconstruction project will improve the safety and ensure mobility for the thousands of motorists who travel the road each day. I am proud to have worked with Governor Paterson to channel these federal funds into hundreds of transportation projects around the State that create jobs and enhance the quality of life for all New Yorkers.”

At the groundbreaking, the Governor announced he has also certified an additional 53 highway and bridge projects eligible for $100.5 million federal recovery funding. Today’s announcement brings the total number of certified highway and bridge projects in New York to 126, with a total cost of $519.6 million, including $389.2 million in ARRA funds.

These certifications include:

Capital Region: an additional $11.6 million for transportation projects bringing to $27 million the total in ARRA funding so far obligated to the Capital Region for transportation and infrastructure. This critical funding will go toward much-needed highway and road repair, bridgework and other long-term improvements to the region’s infrastructure and will create an estimated 221 jobs. In total, the Capital Region is expected to receive $98 million in ARRA funding for transportation and infrastructure projects, which will create an estimated 2,352 jobs.

  • $9.2 million in ARRA funding for a project to replace the bridge over the Fifth Branch of the Mohawk River in the City of Cohoes, Albany County. It calls for the construction of a new three-span steel bridge on the existing bridge alignment, including reconstruction of the Oliver Street/Cedar Street Extension intersection. The bridge being replaced provides access to points south, including the cities of Albany, Troy and Rensselaer via New York State Route 787 and Interstate Routes 787 and 90, which also connect directly to the New York State Thruway. Construction is expected to be completed in spring 2010.
  • $2.45 million of ARRA funding for a project to rehabilitate approaches to seven bridges carrying Interstate 88 in Schoharie County. Guide rails will also be improved at these locations. This work is expected to be completed in the winter of 2009.

(Earlier this month, Governor Paterson announced that in addition to the projects receiving ARRA funding, the NYSDOT will award $87 million in highway and bridge contracts this fiscal year and the Capital District will also receive approximately $31 million in Consolidated Local Street and Highway Improvement Program (CHIPS) funding, based on restoration of funds to the State budget because of ARRA. In total, Capital District communities will receive almost $216 million in highway and bridge funding in State Fiscal Year 2009-10.)

Hudson Valley: an additional $6.1 million for transportation projects bringing to $83.5 million the total in ARRA funding so far obligated to the Hudson Valley for transportation and infrastructure. This critical funding will go toward much-needed highway and road repair, bridgework and other long-term improvements to the region’s infrastructure and will create an estimated 146 jobs.

  • $2.8 million of ARRA funding for a $6.6 million project to provide much-needed general maintenance of four bridges carrying Interstate 84 in the Town of Newburgh, Orange County. The work will extend the service life of the structures and is expected to be completed by the end of 2009.
  • $1.1 million of ARRA funding for a project to replace guide rail at select locations in Westchester County. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of 2009.
  • $2.2 million of ARRA funding for a project to repave approximately four miles of Route 28 between Route 212 and Route 214 in the Town of Shandaken, Ulster County. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the service life of pavement. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of 2009.

(Earlier this month, Governor Paterson announced that in addition to the projects receiving ARRA funding, the NYSDOT will award $94 million in highway and bridge contracts this fiscal year and the Hudson Valley also will receive approximately $38 million in CHIPS funding, based on restoration of funds to the State budget because of ARRA. In total, Hudson Valley communities will receive almost $300 million in highway and bridge funding in State Fiscal Year 2009-10.)

Central New York: an additional $8.4 million for transportation projects bringing to $68 million the total in ARRA funding so far obligated to the Central New York for transportation and infrastructure. This critical funding will go toward much-needed highway and road repair, bridgework and other long-term improvements to the region’s infrastructure and will create an estimated 201 jobs.

  • $2.6 million of ARRA funding for a project to resurface highways in Herkimer County, including approximately 1.5 miles of Route 5S from Main Street in Frankfort to Route 51 in Ilion; approximately three miles of Route 28 from Route 8 to Comstock Bridge in the Town of Russia; and approximately one-half mile of the Route 5S and 28 overlap in the Village of Mohawk and Town of German Flatts. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. On Route 5S, shoulder and centerline rumble strips will be installed as an additional safety feature. Construction is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $1.2 million of ARRA funding for a project to resurface approximately three miles of Route 5S from the Herkimer County Line to Sanders Road in the town of Minden, Montgomery County and resurface approximately 5.5 miles of Route 29 from Vail Mills in the Town of Mayfield to the Saratoga County Line in the Village and Town of Broadalbin, Fulton County. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. Construction is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $2.4 million of ARRA funding to clean and paint nine different state bridges in Cayuga, Oswego, and Onondaga counties. This project will protect the structural integrity of the steel and improve the aesthetic appearance of each bridge. Work is expected to be completed by July 2010.
  • $2.2 million of ARRA funding to rehabilitate multiple state-owned bridges in Cayuga, Cortland, Onondaga, Oswego and Seneca counties. This project will improve the overall condition and safety of multiple state-owned bridges. Construction is expected to be completed by September 2010.

(Earlier this month, Governor Paterson announced that in addition to the ARRA funding, the NYSDOT will award $88 million in highway and bridge contracts this fiscal year and Central New York also will receive approximately $50 million in CHIPS funding, which the recovery funds enabled us to restore to this level in the State budget. In total, Central New York communities will receive more than $220 million in highway and bridge funding in State Fiscal Year 2009-10.)

North Country: an additional $7 million for transportation projects bringing to $27 million the total in ARRA funding so far obligated to the North Country for transportation and infrastructure. This critical funding will go toward much-needed highway and road repair, bridgework and other long-term improvements to the region’s infrastructure and will create an estimated 168 jobs.

  • $3.6 million of ARRA funding for a proje
    ct to clean and repaint nine state highway bridges in order to extend their useful service life. The project includes bridges carrying State Routes 22, 37, 37 C, 420 and 458 and U.S. Route 11 in Franklin, Clinton and St. Lawrence counties. The project is scheduled to be completed in late 2010.
  • $560,000 in ARRA funding for a project to reconstruct 1.5 miles of sidewalks and approximately 100 sidewalk ramps to bring them into compliance with federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) guidelines. Construction will focus on sidewalks and ramps in the Village of Massena and Hamlet of Madrid, St. Lawrence County, Village of Lowville, Lewis County, and Hamlet of Pierrepont Manor, Jefferson County. The project is scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2010.
  • 2.8 million in ARRA funding for a project to construct two new traffic lanes and enhance shoulders on Interstate 81 on Wellesley Island in the Town of Orleans, Jefferson County. The improvements will help expedite border crossing movements and enhance security at the Thousand Islands Bridge. The project is scheduled to be completed late 2009.

(Earlier this month, Governor Paterson announced that in addition to the ARRA funding, the NYSDOT will award $25 million in highway and bridge contracts this fiscal year and the North Country will also receive approximately $23 million in CHIPS funding, which the recovery funds enabled us to restore to this level in the State budget. In total, the North Country will receive $82 million in highway and bridge funding in State Fiscal Year 2009-10.)

Rochester Area (Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, and Wayne counties): an additional $12.9 million for transportation projects bringing to $34.9 million the total in ARRA funding so far obligated to the Rochester Area for transportation and infrastructure. This critical funding will go toward much-needed highway and road repair, bridgework and other long-term improvements to the region’s infrastructure and will create an estimated 309 jobs.

  • $2.4 million of ARRA funding for a project to resurface a portion of State Route 15 from Route 252 to I-390 in the towns of Brighton and Henrietta, Monroe County. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. Needed drainage cleaning and repairs to improve the quality of storm-water runoff also will be provided. The project is expected to be completed this fall.
  • $1.2 million of ARRA funding for a project to resurface a portion of State Route 31F from Route 250 in the village of Fairport to the Wayne County line in the town of Perinton, Monroe County. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. Needed drainage cleaning and repairs to improve the quality of storm-water runoff also will be provided. The project is expected to be completed this fall.
  • $2 million of ARRA funding for the construction of a Genesee Valley Greenway Trail bridge over the Genesee River at Route 36 in the towns of Mt. Morris and Leicester, Livingston County. This new pedestrian bridge will make continuous a significant portion of the trail facility. The project is expected to be completed by late 2010.
  • $1 million of ARRA funding for a project to resurface a portion of State Route 96 from Kreag Road in the town of Perinton, Monroe County, to Route 64 in the town of Pittsford, Monroe County. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. Needed drainage cleaning and repairs to improve the quality of storm-water runoff also will be provided. The completion date is expected to be completed this fall.
  • $600,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface a portion of State Route 96 from Rt. 88 to Lester Road in the village of Phelps, Ontario County. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. Needed drainage cleaning and repairs to improve the quality of storm-water runoff also will be provided. The project is expected to be completed this fall.
  • $3.7 million of ARRA funding for a project to resurface a portion of State Route 531 from Route 36 in the town of Ogden, Monroe County, to I-490 in the town of Gates, Monroe County. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. Needed drainage cleaning and repairs to improve the quality of storm-water runoff also will be provided. The project is scheduled for completion in spring 2010.
  • $2 million of ARRA funding for a project to upgrade bridges on Driving Park, East Main Street, Main Street, Court Street, Elmwood Avenue, Lake Avenue, Andrews Street and Ford Street in the City of Rochester, Monroe County, with appropriate preventive and corrective maintenance treatments. This type of work keeps the system in a state of good repair. The project is expected to be completed this fall.

(Earlier this month, Governor Paterson announced that in addition to the projects receiving ARRA funding, the NYSDOT will award $82 million in highway and bridge contracts this fiscal year and the Rochester area will also receive approximately $29 million in CHIPS funding, which the recovery funds enabled us to restore to this level in the State budget. In total, Rochester area communities will receive more than $185 million in highway and bridge funding in State Fiscal Year 2009-10.)

Southern Tier: an additional $29.8 million for transportation projects bringing to $49.1 million the total in ARRA funding so far obligated to the Southern Tier for transportation and infrastructure. This critical funding will go toward much-needed highway and road repair, bridgework and other long-term improvements to the region’s infrastructure and will create an estimated 772 jobs.

  • $18.3 million of ARRA funding for a $73.4 million project to build embankment and pavement on a five-mile section of relocated US Route 15 in the Town of Lindley, Steuben County. This project is the first phase of a staged project to build a four lane highway which will be designated Interstate 99. The project is expected to be completed in the summer of 2012.
  • $800,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface seven miles of County Route 12 from the Village of Alfred to State Route 417 in the towns of Andover, Ward, and Alfred, Allegany County. Existing pavement will be overlaid to provide a smooth surface and prolong the life of the pavement. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $270,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface 2.5 miles of County Route 16 from Meads Hill Road to Townsend Road in the Town of Dix, Schuyler County. The existing pavement will be resurfaced to provide a smooth surface and prolong the life of the pavement. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $250,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface 1.8 miles of County Route 32 from County Route 29 to County Route 33 in the Town of Jerusalem, Yates County. Existing pavement will be overlaid to provide a smooth surface and prolong the life of the pavement. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $309,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface 1.9 miles of County Route 14 from County Route 15 south in the Town of Bath, Steuben County. The existing pavement will be recycled and resurfaced with new asphalt. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $545,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface 3.3 miles of County Route 14 from County Route 69 north in the towns of Bath and Howard, Steuben County. The existing pavement will be recycled and resurfaced with new asphalt. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $145,000 of ARRA funding for a project to
    resurface four-tenths of a mile of East Avenue from Main Street to Addison Street in the Village of Arkport, Steuben County. The existing deteriorated pavement surface will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $156,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface 1.2 miles of streets in the City of Hornell, Steuben County. The project will overlay the existing pavement on portions of Thatcher, North Church, Erie, Center, and Adsit Streets to provide a smooth surface and prolong the life of the pavement. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $22,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface two-tenths of a mile of West Third Street in the City of Corning, Steuben County. The existing deteriorated pavement surface, from Walnut Street to State Street, will be removed and replaced with new asphalt. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $19,000 of ARRA funding for a project to resurface one-tenth of a mile of East Third Street from Cedar Street to Pine Street in the City of Corning, Steuben County. The existing deteriorated pavement surface will be removed and replaced with new asphalt. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $89,000 of ARRA funding to resurface four-tenths of a mile of West William Street from Pulteney Street to Bissell Avenue in the City of Corning, Steuben County. The existing deteriorated pavement surface will be removed and replaced with new asphalt. The project is expected to be completed this summer.
  • $3.5 million of ARRA funding for a project to resurface 18 miles of State Route 17 in the Town of Windsor in Broome County. Construction is expected to be completed in the fall of 2009.
  • $140,000 of ARRA funding for a project to install new signage on County Routes 5, 10A, 25, 32, 32A, 32B, 33, 34, 35, 36 and 44 in Chenango County. This work is expected to be completed in the winter of 2009.
  • $270,000 of ARRA funding for a culvert replacement project on County Route 8 in the Town of Cobleskill, Schoharie County. Work is expected to be completed in the fall of 2009.
  • $3.3 million of ARRA funding for a project to rehabilitate culverts along Interstate 88 in the Towns of Otego, Oneonta, Milford and Maryland, Otsego County. Construction is expected to be completed in the winter of 2010.
  • $550,000 of ARRA funding for a project to bring sidewalks and curbs at select locations in the Town of Union and Villages of John City and Endicott into compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. Work is expected to be completed in the winter of 2010.
  • $1 million of ARRA funding for a project to remove hazardous trees in south Delaware County. Removal of these trees will increase safety for the traveling public. This work is expected to be completed in the winter of 2009.

(Earlier this month, Governor Paterson announced that in addition to the projects receiving ARRA funding, the NYSDOT will award $166 million in highway and bridge contracts this fiscal year and the Southern Tier also will receive approximately $50 million in CHIPS funding, which the recovery funds enabled us to restore to this level in the State budget. In total, Southern Tier communities in DOT Regions 6 and 9 will receive more than $305 million in highway and bridge funding in State Fiscal Year 2009-10.)

Western New York (Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, and Niagara counties): an additional $23.1 million for transportation projects bringing to $32 million the total in ARRA funding so far obligated to the Southern Tier for transportation and infrastructure. This critical funding will go toward much-needed highway and road repair, bridgework and other long-term improvements to the region’s infrastructure and will create an estimated 554 jobs.

  • $2.5 million of ARRA funding for a $10.9 million project to rehabilitate approximately 6.5 miles of Interstate 86 eastbound in the towns of Randolph and Cold Springs and the village of Randolph, all in Cattaraugus County. The project is addressing deteriorating pavement conditions. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $2.8 million of ARRA funding for a $20.2 million to rehabilitate approximately 12 miles of Interstate 86 in the Towns of Sherman, North Harmony, and Ellery, in Chautauqua County. Eleven miles eastbound and 1 mile westbound will be improved. Project completion is fall 2009.
  • $1 million of ARRA funding to replace the bridge for NY Route 20 over Bell Creek in the Town of Westfield, Chautauqua County. The existing bridge will be replaced with 3-side pre-cast concrete bridge. Project completion is winter 2009.
  • $7 million of ARRA funding for a $11.4 million project to reconstruct Maple Road for 1.6 miles from Route 62 to Flint Road — the entrance to State University of New York at Buffalo — in the Town of Amherst, Erie County. The project will also reconstruct and widen North Bailey Avenue for 0.4 miles from Maple Road to Romney Road in the Town of Amherst, Erie County. The project will also include new sidewalk areas and closed drainage improvements. Project completion is fall 2010.
  • $2.3 million of ARRA funding for a $3.8 million project to construct four new local roads in support of the Inner Harbor Redevelopment Plan, City of Buffalo, Erie County. The four roads are Lloyd, Hanover, Perry, and Prime Slip. Project completion is fall 2010.
  • $500,000 of ARRA funding for a $2.3 million project to paint eight bridges in various locations in the city of Buffalo and town of Tonawanda, Erie County. The bridge painting is preventive maintenance. Project completion is summer 2010.
  • $700,000 of ARRA funding to mill and re-pave highway access ramps with a single course overlay. Ramp locations, all in Erie County, include: N.Y. Route 78 in the towns of Clarence and Amherst, N.Y. Route 263 in the town of Amherst, N.Y. Route 33 in the town of Cheektowaga, N.Y. Route 240 in the towns of Cheektowaga and Amherst, Interstate 290 in the town of Amherst. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the service life of pavement. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $500,000 of ARRA funding to replace joints on various bridges along the NY Route 33 corridor in the city of Buffalo and town of Cheektowaga, Erie County. The project is scheduled for completion this fall.
  • $200,000 of ARRA funding to seal pavement cracks on federal aid-eligible routes in northern Erie County. Sealing surface cracks in asphalt helps prevent moisture from infiltrating beneath the pavement surface, extending the pavement’s service life. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $100,000 of ARRA funding to repave a one-mile portion of U.S. Route 20A (Quaker Street) in the village of Orchard Park, Erie County. The project will address deteriorating pavement conditions. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the service life of pavement. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $500,000 of ARRA funding to repave a 5.8-mile-long section of N.Y. Route 39 in Erie County, from N.Y. Route 75 in the town of Collins to Trevett Road in the town of Concord. The project will address deteriorating pavement conditions. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the service life of pavement. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $700,000 of ARRA funding to repave a 3.5-mile-long portion of N.Y. Route 249 in the Town of North Collins, Erie County. The project will address deteriorating pavement conditions. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the
    service life of pavement. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $200,000 of ARRA funding to seal pavement cracks on federal aid-eligible routes in southern Erie County. Sealing surface cracks in asphalt helps prevent moisture from infiltrating beneath the pavement surface, extending the pavement’s service life. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $700,000 of ARRA funding to repave a 3.7-mile-long portion of N.Y. Route 425 in the town of Cambria, Niagara County. The paving will extend from Upper Mountain Road to N.Y. Route 104. It will address deteriorating pavement conditions. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the service life of pavement. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $1.9 million of ARRA funding to repave a 10.4-mile-long portion of N.Y. Route 77 in the towns of Lockport and Royalton, Niagara County. The project will extend from N.Y. Route 31 to the Genesee County line. It will address deteriorating pavement conditions. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the service life of pavement. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $1.3 million of ARRA funding to repave a 5.8-mile-long portion of NY Route 429 in Niagara County. The project will extend from Lockport Road in the town of Wheatfield to N.Y. Route 104 in the towns of Cambria and Lockport, where the centerline of the road is the municipal boundary. The project will address deteriorating pavement conditions. The top layer of worn, deteriorated pavement will be removed and replaced with new asphalt and fresh pavement markings to extend the service life of pavement. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.
  • $200,000 of ARRA funding to seal pavement cracks on federal aid-eligible routes in Niagara County. Sealing surface cracks in asphalt helps prevent moisture from infiltrating beneath the pavement surface, extending the pavement’s service life. The project is scheduled for completion this summer.

(Earlier this month, Governor Paterson announced that in addition to the projects receiving ARRA funding, the NYSDOT will award $75 million in highway and bridge contracts this fiscal year and Western New York also will receive approximately $32.9 million in CHIPS funding, based on restoration of funds to the State budget because of ARRA. In total, Western New York communities will receive more than $180 million in highway and bridge funding in State Fiscal Year 2009-10.)

New York is expected to receive approximately $26.7 billion in ARRA funding over two years, which the White House estimates will create or retain 215,000 jobs. The economic recovery funds coming to New York for transportation projects must follow the same process required for distributing all federal transportation funds. The funds are allocated to projects that are selected by the 13 regional Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO’s) across the State, which are comprised of local elected officials, local transit operators and members of the Department of Transportation. MPO’s vote unanimously on projects for their Transportation Improvement Program, and economic recovery funds will be directed to projects on those lists.

Similarly, regions of New York without MPO’s are served by the NYSDOT, which consults with local elected officials and selects projects for the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The Department is working with local officials and the Governor’s Economic Recovery Cabinet to identify priority shovel-ready projects eligible for recovery funds.

The projects do not include DOT Regions 10 and 11, Long Island and New York City respectively. Last month Governor Paterson announced that Long Island will receive more than $150 million in ARRA funding for transportation projects, $69 million of which has already been certified. New York City projects and funding are expected to be announced in the coming weeks.

Gov. Schwarzenegger Attends First Construction Groundbreaking Of A Recovery Act Funded Infrastructure Project

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) announced on Thursday the first construction groundbreaking of an infrastructure project funded by the America Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) in California.

The project will create more than an estimated 200 jobs in the construction industry and improve the pavement on a 50-year-old section of Interstate 80 located in the Bay Area’s Fairfield between State Route 12 and Air Base Parkway, a roadway used by nearly 200,000 motorists each day. Funded fully by Recovery Act dollars and coming in nearly 40 percent under original cost estimates, this project was the first ARRA project bid to be opened, awarded and break ground on construction in California.

“When President Obama made infrastructure projects a priority, we immediately took action because we know firsthand this investment provides a shot to the arm for our economy and puts Californians back to work,” said Gov. Schwarzenegger. “The groundbreaking of this project illustrates how quickly and effectively we are pumping Recovery Act funding into our economy to create jobs for Californians and invest in the future of our state’s infrastructure.”

Expected to be completed by the end of 2009, the $13.5 million project will resurface and repair the freeway thereby extending pavement life, saving taxpayers money, and improving road conditions for motorists and truckers moving goods. The winning bid from contractor Top Grade Construction of Livermore was the lowest bid submitted at nearly 40 percent below the California Department of Transportation’s (Caltrans) cost estimate of $29.5 million. Savings from this project have been directed to advance other highway projects.

“This is the first Recovery Act funded infrastructure project to break ground in California, with $13.5 million in spending hitting the streets and our economy,” said Will Kempton, director of Caltrans and a member of the Governor’s California Recovery Act Task Force. “The Department is working around the clock with the federal government to ensure that these Recovery Act dollars are pumped into our economy as quickly and effectively as possible to create jobs, jobs, jobs.”

By the end of April, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) will have authorized the expenditure of nearly $850 million in federal economic stimulus funds to California for transportation projects, putting the state on track to have $900 million authorized by June 30 to meet the requirements of the Recovery Act. Funds that other states do not use by this deadline will become available for the other states for transportation projects, which California will pursue aggressively.

Estimates show California will receive nearly $2.6 billion from the Recovery Act for highways and local streets and $1 billion for transit projects. Discretionary programs could add another $300 million and California expects to be very competitive in securing a portion of $8 billion set aside nationally for high-speed rail and intercity rail.

Greg Sitek

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